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    Re: World's TUGBOATS

    Originally posted by ombugge View Post
    I posted another picture of this one in the shipspotting thread
    Give us a clue Ombugge - can't find it!!
    Cheers,

    Mark.

    www.pologlover.co.uk

    Comment


      Re: World's TUGBOATS

      Originally posted by janihudi View Post
      surching for info about the ''YAPEYU'' i found this on that Argetinian site aswel

      http://www.histarmar.com.ar/Antartid...os/Itasca-.htm
      For my translation of the first passage you gave see http://www.captainsvoyage-forum.com/...2767#post92767
      Last edited by wherrygirl; August 6th, 2012, 12:11.
      Ivy

      "To thine own self be true.......
      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

      Comment


        Re: World's TUGBOATS

        PS. On second thoughts I'll post the info. about the Yapeyu here for anyone interested, see Thijs' remarks in the previous post.
        My Spanish does not run to technical terms, so I had to consult my dictionary for some of the nautical ones, but translated it says:

        Ex “Petrel”, ex ”Cremona” ex “Irán Cremona”.- Sister ships “Maipú” and “Alberto Dodero”

        Flying the Argentine flag, later Singaporean, built April 1951 at Giessen & Zonen’s shipyard at Krimpen a/d Ijssel, The Netherlands, for the Flota Argentina de Navegacion de Ultramar. (Later ELMA)
        Length 159,39 m. Overall width 19,56 m. Depth of hold 11,61 m. Draft 7,90 m.
        Passengers 753 Crew 165
        TAT 11590 tons TAN 7935 tons DWT: 7,810 tons (Obviously the gross and net weights but I’m not sure what the third one is. Dead weight?)
        Propulsion: two Diesel motors, Werkspoor – Sulzer, 2T SA; 10 cylinders (600 X 1.040) N.V. Koningklijke Maas “De Schelde”, two fixed pitch propellers.
        Max. Speed 17 Knots

        In 1956 the vessel made the first round-the-world navigation by a merchant vessel with passengers under the Argentine flag.
        In 1959 she made the second cruise by an Argentinian vessel to the Antarctic, the first having been made by a vessel of the Transportes Navales (Naval Transport) a year before. She is the first passenger vessel in the world to operate in the Antarctic with passengers. (see “HMS Carnarvon Castle” in the second section.) [another part of the website] On 24.05.1961 she became part of the fleet ELMA SA, and in 1964 went into service in the Mediterranean.

        She was moored (?) during 1968 in Buenos Aires together with her sister-ship “Alberto Dodero”, after a much criticised agreement between ELMA and the competing Italian company Costa Armatori SpA. The same year the two vessels were sold to the company Transportes Oceanicos and converted into vessels for transporting cattle “en pie” [ I think this must mean live cattle, literally cattle on their feet]for the stockyard Sanym, with capacity for transporting 2000 head of beef cattle or 16,000 ewes. Her name was changed to “Petrel” and in 1971 she started service between Australia and the Persian Gulf.
        In 1973 she was transferred to the company Transagro SA Naviera y Agropecuaria, and a year later was sold to the Cormoran Steamship Co. of Singapore, lowering the Argentine flag and receiving the name “Cremona”. In 1976 she became known as “Iran Cremona”.
        April 1980 was scrapped in Kaohsiung, India


        Registered (or Certificated) 1.704 F
        Call signal(?): L. P. B. Y.
        Fuel capacity: 1.564 tons IFO
        Daily consumption: 31 tons IFO
        IMO Nº 5395101
        Last edited by wherrygirl; August 6th, 2012, 12:13.
        Ivy

        "To thine own self be true.......
        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

        Comment


          Re: World's TUGBOATS

          Originally posted by PoloUK View Post
          Give us a clue Ombugge - can't find it!!
          Sorry, in the Ports of the World thread.

          Comment


            Re: World's TUGBOATS

            Originally posted by PoloUK View Post
            Number 904/3: That rather unloved looking new ferry in the background? Is that the 'Norman Leader' - commissioned by LD Lines for Portsmouth - Le Havre but cancelled last year for a number of reasons - or something else?
            Originally posted by ombugge View Post
            Sorry, in the Ports of the World thread.
            Here you go Mark.
            http://www.captainsvoyage-forum.com/...2607#post92607

            And i think you are correct, Well spotted!

            LD Lines now accepting bookings? I don't think so!
            http://www.anyferry.co.uk/ld-lines-n...on-giant-ship/
            Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

            Comment


              Re: World's TUGBOATS

              I have no idea what has gone wrong here. I understand there is an issue with the DWT, which has held up delivery. I don't know if it is a designer problem or a builder problem.
              This again has given LD Lines a reason to cancel the contract, which came in handy for them due to excess of ferries.

              I'm pretty sure I have posted pictures of this ferry earlier, but can't recall when and where.

              Comment


                Re: World's TUGBOATS

                That optimistic article in anyferry.co.uk was end of 2010!!

                Another view here:

                http://www.ferryfantastic.webs.com/normanleader.htm

                LD Lines do still operate here - joint venture with DFDS on Dover - Calais, plus Portsmouth - Le Havre, Newhaven - Dieppe and they have one half way down France from Gijon to St Nazaire.

                We do also get a new line - owned by Eurotunnel - eventually - having bought up the old Seafrance ships (which aren't very old or very French).

                None of this has ANYTHING to do with Tugboats!! Thanks Ombugge.
                Cheers,

                Mark.

                www.pologlover.co.uk

                Comment


                  Re: World's TUGBOATS

                  "BB Coaster" inbound to Kristiansund yesterday afternoon.

                  Regards,
                  Eskild
                  Master Mariner

                  Comment


                    Re: World's TUGBOATS

                    "BB Server" inbound to Kristiansund yesterday afternoon.



                    Regards,
                    Eskild
                    Master Mariner

                    Comment


                      Re: World's TUGBOATS

                      Mega Mammut in Geiranger this morning:

                      Comment


                        Re: World's TUGBOATS

                        "Abramis" inbound to Kristiansund saturday afternoon.

                        Regards,
                        Eskild
                        Master Mariner

                        Comment


                          Re: World's TUGBOATS

                          "Celsus" towed by "Abramis" saturday afternoon.

                          Regards,
                          Eskild
                          Master Mariner

                          Comment


                            Re: World's TUGBOATS

                            "Rusken"



                            Comment


                              Re: World's TUGBOATS

                              "Max Mammut" towing the condemned fishing vessel "Ramnfjord" together with the floating crane "Mammutkrana III" in Freifjorden this afternoon.



                              Regards,
                              Eskild
                              Master Mariner

                              Comment


                                Re: World's TUGBOATS

                                A world away from Eskild's working boats, and back a few years. These are from the 'M-Shed', the museum of life in Bristol. The boats are in the 'Floating Dock' i.e. behind the lock, protected from the enormous tidal range of the Severn Estuary and British Channel.

                                Firstly the Mayflower of 1861.





                                And then bang up to date - well, 1935, with 'John King' - running around the dock with paying guests at the weekend. She worked all her life on the Avon until 1976 - with such high profile jobs as towing the SS Great Britain to her current dry dock, and is now in gracious retirement at the museum.







                                Cheers,

                                Mark.

                                www.pologlover.co.uk

                                Comment

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