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World's FISHING BOATS

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    #76
    Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
    I should be used to it by now but... they sure do seem to be riding low in the water.
    I always think that, but i have been told it's normal. We just can't have the same amount of fish here in N.Devon I have never seen boats coming in that low in the water. Even down in the fishing ports of Newlyn and Penzance. If we saw a boat that low in the water we would be a bit worried! They just look like they would all but disappear in anymore than a moderate swell - just the wheel house showing

    Originally posted by Asimut View Post
    "Leanja" passing by Tromsø this afternoon with 310 tons herring on her way to Lødingen.

    Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

    Comment


      #77
      Before E gets to you: have you been a good boy this year?

      Of course!!! Santa is coming soon, you know...

      Naturally, if you ask me, there is nothing like a Canon, but I'm sure if you ask Photoman, he'll advice you to go Nikon...
      I know. It's just like in the mobile phone world; the classic Nokian vs. Sony Ericsson discussion.
      I have great respect for Nikon you see. Just think about the history and how many of the famous pictures in the world that are taken with a Nikon. It was bulletproof (saved a reporter in the Vietnam conflict) and was the chosen camera in all the major wars. I wonder how many brave soldiers who saw into a Nikon as the last thing in their life..?
      (Am I too difficult and thinking too complicated...?).
      And let me just say: I don't say that pros don't use Canon...., just take a look at Jan-Olavs pictures!!!!

      Maybe I see Nikon more as the professional photographers camera and too difficult to operate for a novise like me.

      Haven't made up my mind yet, so we'll see....

      Now, this is a discussion that should continue in the proper thread. It was not the intention for me, with a major degree in OT, to bring this question into a fishing vessel thread, you see....
      Last edited by Sterkoder; November 9th, 2009, 21:47.
      "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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        #78
        Hey there Big S, (just before you go to the proper thread ) this is of course all very exciting, but don’t forget your own advice about the person behind the camera being the most important thing for making a good photo!

        Comment


          #79
          Originally posted by pakarang View Post
          .... the Greenlandic people appears to be very colorful in areas where the Norwegians can be quite dull in their choice of colors.
          . . . and the Norwegians are more colourful than we here in Scotland !!!! (although I do have an apartment in a yellow-painted block!). But yes I very much agree with you about Greenland, and it was this aspect that encouraged me to experiment a little with colour in frames around the photos. (Whereas the frame style in Seagull’s Trondheim thread is more, what shall I say, a direct homage to my master. . . .).

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            #80
            Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
            I always think that, but i have been told it's normal. We just can't have the same amount of fish here in N.Devon I have never seen boats coming in that low in the water. Even down in the fishing ports of Newlyn and Penzance. If we saw a boat that low in the water we would be a bit worried! They just look like they would all but disappear in anymore than a moderate swell - just the wheel house showing
            Here is a picture from an earlier time, when load line was unheard of on fishing vessels:

            Load line was top of the booths when standing aft of the deck bins.

            With the net boats hanging in the davits the stability could not have been too good. Usually they would tow the boats when fully loaded.

            I found some interesting film cut from the herring fisheries in the "golden age" of the 1950s. reverting when time permits.

            Comment


              #81
              That's interesting, it looks like you could be standing on the main deck with your feet actually below the water line. For me that would be an unnerving experience! Trying to work out the deck level of that boat, instinct tells me it should be at the bottom of the white bulwarks, but commonsense tells me the scuppers should be at least a few inches above the water level, cannot believe she would be running with the deck awash?
              Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

              Comment


                #82
                Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
                That's interesting, it looks like you could be standing on the main deck with your feet actually below the water line. For me that would be an unnerving experience! Trying to work out the deck level of that boat, instinct tells me it should be at the bottom of the white bulwarks, but commonsense tells me the scuppers should be at least a few inches above the water level, cannot believe she would be running with the deck awash?
                There was no scuppers on these fishing boats, but a few inches of gap between the deck and the bulwark. In this pic the deck line amidships would have been level, or maybe slightly below water level in "idle" condition, I would guess.

                Like I said in the earlier post; "load line was the top of the booths when standing behind the deck bins". In other word if the Skipper did not get wet feet when on deck in his booths she was not loaded.

                Slightly exaggerated maybe) but I do remember one beautiful and calm spring day in 1956, they were fishing herrings almost inside the harbour in Aalesund, the skipper on MV "Yukon" did just that. He did not dear to start the engine, however, but used the net boats to tow her to the nearest fish meal factory, which was only a few miles away.

                I'll post some more on this subject later.

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                  #83
                  Do not sneeze or cough or else your boat might sink. When there are fish to be caught and money to be made I am sure the time to stop can get pushed pretty far.

                  Comment


                    #84
                    Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
                    Do not sneeze or cough or else your boat might sink. When there are fish to be caught and money to be made I am sure the time to stop can get pushed pretty far.
                    There is an old saying, from up north in Norway I believe: My brother was lucky, he fished until he sunk
                    Last edited by ombugge; November 14th, 2009, 17:36.

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                      #85
                      Herring Fishery, 1950s

                      As said earlier, I found a couple of short films about the "golden age" of herring fishery along the coast of North West Norway in the 1950s. In those years fishing boats with up to 10-15,000 men used to wait at strategic ports for the famous Marine Biologist Finn Devold on board the research vessel G.O.Sars to tell them that the herrings had got within "striking distance" before venturing out, as can be seen in the first Part.

                      In Aalesund the population would double at times, mainly with idle fishermen, but also seasonal workers that arrived from all over Norway, and from Sweden and Finland, to work in the fish factories ashore.

                      It could get lively at times, especially if the waiting time got long, or the weather was adverse when the herring approached the coast.
                      Good time for me who sold the local newspaper to the crowed, but busy time for the police, who tried to keep the tempers from flaring out of control.

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cahz-Od_q2s



                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etFAhK0DomM



                      Sorry, no text but the pictures should speak for themselves. All hard manual work and none of today's technology available.

                      Living conditions on board was also VERY cramped and things like showers unheard of.
                      Last edited by pakarang; November 14th, 2009, 20:03. Reason: Embedded youtube clips.

                      Comment


                        #86
                        Fishing Vessels I have served on.

                        Here are some of the vessels I have served on.


                        Amaltal Explorer.
                        My first vessel. Bulit in 1986 by C N Santidamingo in Spain. 65m long and is a Head and Gut trawler. I served on this vessel from 1986 until 1992.


                        Amaltal Voyager.
                        Built in 1971 by C N Santadomingo in Spain. A wet fish trawler of 33m in length.


                        Amaltal Columbia. Built by Sterkoder in 1992. I went to Norway to bring Columbia back to New Zealand. This vessel and her sister ship Amaltal Atlantis were the best vessels I have sailed on due to the comfort and stability of the boats. You had to look out the port hole to see if it was rough or not.


                        Amaltal Atlantis. Sister ship to Amaltal Columbia. Altantis went fishing for the russians before being tied up in the Philipines. Amaltal purchased the vessel and I was part of the refit team to bring the vessel up to Amaltal standards. Atlantis was the last vessel I served on.
                        Last edited by Kiwi Sailor; November 14th, 2009, 23:20.

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                          #87
                          Other New Zealand Vessels.

                          San Aspiring.

                          Janas

                          Antarctic Chieftain

                          Amaltal Enterprise

                          San Waitaki

                          San Enterprise

                          Research Vessel Tangaroa

                          Taimania

                          Thomas Harrison

                          Comment


                            #88
                            Where are they now?

                            Does any body know the where abouts or new names for the following Noweign vessels which have fished in New Zealand?

                            Ottor Birting, Clara Birting, Tampen, Noron?
                            Last edited by Kiwi Sailor; November 15th, 2009, 21:06.

                            Comment


                              #89
                              Originally posted by Kiwi Sailor View Post
                              Does nay body know the where abouts or new names for the following Norwegian vessels which have fished in New Zealand?

                              Ottor Birting, Clara Birting, Tampen, Noron?
                              Here is a list of Norwegian trawlers that was fishing off New Zealand in the 1990s

                              JOHN LONGVA
                              KLARA BIRTING
                              LABRADOR
                              LONGVA II
                              LONGVA III
                              NORORN
                              OTTAR BIRTING
                              RAMOEN
                              TAMPEN
                              And from Faeroyes:
                              POLARBORG
                              TINDUR (Island?)

                              We supplied 4 Indonesian Production Workers each for most of these vessels in the early days of Norwegian fisheries off NZ.

                              I'm afraid I don't know what happened to these trawlers. I think they all left after the Orange Roughy was fished out.

                              Thanks for posting pics of the "Janas", which I was involved with at one time.

                              The other Long Liner ("San Aspiring") also looks familiar. Could that be ex "Azelia Glazial" (not sure of spelling) or one of her three sisters?
                              She was arrested for illegal fishing after Tooth fish and laid up here in Singapore for a long while. I think she eventually went to NZ.

                              Comment


                                #90
                                As a contrast to post # 85, showing the way herring fisheries were done in the 1950s, here is a modern Purse Seiner doing the same thing in 2009:
                                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sti2ux3IbeA
                                No text, only noise.

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