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Heavy Lift Carriers

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    Heavy Lift Carriers



    Looks like it works now. Will post more when time permits.
    This pics got lost because I moved it on photobucket.com.
    Now restored (I hope)
    Last edited by ombugge; April 24th, 2009, 12:51. Reason: Still learning

    #2
    Originally posted by ombugge View Post


    Looks like it works now. Will post more when time permits
    Very interesting image of the heavy lifter almost submerged! Really awesome!
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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      #3
      Mighty Servant 3 with Trident 12 on deck

      She was ballasted to the max. allowed to (and then some) to load the J/U Rig Trident 12. Barely any freeboard, even at the Forec'sled deck.


      Here she is, ready to depart Johor for Bombay. (2001 I think)
      I'll try to put together a posting with the loading process sequencial for those who are interested in this kind of operations.
      Last edited by ombugge; April 24th, 2009, 12:53. Reason: Pics lost. now restored

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        #4
        I for one would be very interested seeing this sequence.... quite amazing operation to sink a ship in order to move a rig!
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
        Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
        Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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          #5
          M.S.3 Sinking

          Here is a few pics from when the Mighty Servant 3 sunk off Lunada, Angola in Dec. 2006:






          She has now been salvaged and is back in service.

          FYI The rig being offloaded, the Aleutian Key, floated off with the full crew of 85 on board and no damages. She was towed to her first drilling location.

          Sorry about the distortion on these pics. I took them from the MIGAS Report, issued to "transfere expert knowledge". (In this case how NOT to offload rigs)

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            #6
            Those are indeed quite dramatic images of a time when something went a bit wrong.

            Very interesting to see these images though.
            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
            Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
            Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

            Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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              #7
              Heavy Lift Carriers

              Since these ships isn't realy Offshore Vessels and doesn't fit into any other category in this forum (at least as far as I have found) I think it appropriate to start a new thread only for this type of vessels, of which there are many.

              I can start of this tread with the promissed sequence of loading.
              The following is from the load-out of the newbuilt J/U Willpower (AWILCO, Oslo at that time) on the Black Marlin (Dockwise) in S'pore in Aug. 2006, bound for Ras Tanura, Saudi Arabia:


              Cribbing and Guide Posts being prepared on the deck of Black Marlin.



              Wilpower ready to depart from the building yard, PPL, Singapore.


              Black Marlin standing by at Jurong West Anchorage.


              Wilpower arrived at JWA and standing by. Waiting on daylight tomorrow for loading.


              First light. Black Marlin has ballasted down to deck just out of water during the night.


              Wilpower postioned on deck with Stopper against aft Guide Post.


              On deck with space to spare.


              Seafastening. (The rig will float off if the HVC should sink)


              Transvers seafastening. Strong box welded to the rig, stoppers to the ship, but no welding between the two. (Rig can float free)



              Black Marlin with Wilpower secured on deck, ready to depart S'pore for R.T., Saudi Arabia.

              (I'll see if I can find some pics of the actual positioning of the rig over the cribbing, an operation that require great accuracy)

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                #8
                Absolutely amazing operation and amazing ships..

                I have a couple of heavy lifters in my files as well, I'll pull the files out.
                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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                  #9
                  J.O.

                  Maybe you can transfer my earlier postings of HLC to this thread as well?

                  I have pics from several loading and off-loading operation, incl. the most difficult one I have been involded in; transport of the bottom slabs of the Ekofisk Barrier from Rotterdam to Aalfjord in 1988.

                  That was the heaviest single cargo carried at that time, (27,000 t. each)
                  The problem was not only the weight and size (140 m. diam.), but the fact that it was concrete, which doesn't bend like steel does. VERY trick.

                  Reverting with that transport and the Tow-out of the Ekofisk Barrier the following year + a couple of other major operations from that same year in the North Sea. (Have to dig them out and scan first)

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by ombugge View Post
                    Maybe you can transfer my earlier postings of HLC to this thread as well?
                    Good idea. Done as we speak.

                    Looking forward to seeing this interesting thread grow.
                    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      ombugge: I am glad you joined the forum. I really like the up close pictures and description of the heavy lifts. Thank you.

                      Is it common to not weld the load to the ship? Or is this a new procedure since the Mighty Servant sinking?

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                        #12
                        Is it common to not weld the load to the ship? Or is this a new procedure since the Mighty Servant sinking?
                        Yes it has been the practise for many years. In the early days of dry transport of rigs on barges (1975 - 1980) it was not always the case, but since the Heavy Lift Ships came on the market it has been.

                        This only apply to rigs and barges etc., which is loaded by "Float on/off", not to non-buoyant cargos, such as Offshore Structures etc. loaded by Skid-on.

                        When the Migthy Servant 2 capsized and sunk in Berhala Strait, Indonesia with a 10,000 t. Deck Structure on board, the cargo did not fall off, even at 90 degr. list.

                        I'll see if I can post a few pics of a Skid-on operation as well.

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                          #13
                          Off-loading operation

                          Here is the reverse operation.
                          Russian J/U Murmanskaya arriving Singapore from Murmansk via Stavanger and Cape of Good Hope for much needed upgrading. Something like 13,000 n.miles voyage on deck of the HLC Transhelf.

                          The Yard take this opportunity to check the plate thickness.


                          Here is why. We don't want her to sink on the way in to the Yard. (MPA S'pore may get a little upset)


                          The next morning.Transhelf partly ballasted down, ready for offloading


                          OK. Enough clearance but we still need some more water above deck.


                          Tugs made fast and ready to pull us off.


                          We are moving away from the Guide post.



                          We are off. Her is what is left of the aft Stabilizing Columns. Crew is waiting for the boat to take them back to the Forecastle.

                          Where the heck is the deck?


                          Under tow to the yard.


                          A bit of a special design this one. Russian designed and built to be moved through the rivers between the Caspian Sea and the White Sea.

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                            #14
                            Absolutely fascinating. I have never seen this operation from such a short distance. I especially like picture N° 7!! Curious sight. Thank you for sharing these with us.
                            Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

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                              #15
                              Amazing. Just so cool to see these photos up close. Just reminds me that one never stops learning...I find out something new every day here!!!! WAAAYYY cool!!

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