Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

World's OFFSHORE VESSELS

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Just a couple of iPhone-images from Kristiansund today. Both with a HDR filter attached
    First one from quay #9 at Vestbase Oilfield Service Base towards west. Looks like a front is arriving from the ocean.
    23843510_10156150801544610_8449545801637747390_n by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    Second one from the area around Thon Hotel at Innlandet. The blue one is ex. Rem Gambler, now Normand Drott. The orange one to the left is Normand Prosper and the one to the right is Edda Fauna
    24059104_10156150965354610_8617920265390635968_n by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr
    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

    Comment


      Great quality despite iPHONE.

      Are these offshore vessels in some kind of lay-up or are they just "visiting"?
      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

      Comment


        The Normand Maximus is one of the largest and most sophisticated Subsea Construction Vessels in the world.
        Here is why:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCtx-bEHKVQ&t=16s

        Comment


        • Clipper
          Clipper commented
          Editing a comment
          Fascinating!

          Vertical Lay System (VLS): It's clear from the animation at 5:57 - 6:02 that the cable/pipe must be fed at the same rate as the ship's speed-over-the-ground, otherwise, the cable would tend to become puckered or stretched.

          Ombugge, how deep is your insider knowledge? What is the control system for the VLS?

          Measuring/controlling the feed rate isn't at all difficult but not so speed-over-the-ground. Do they actually measure speed-over-the-ground or is satellite position information accurate enough for this? Or is there some other trick that allows the cable to be fed "on demand"?

        Here is the latest and best American built Offshore vessels, the MPSV Harvey Blue Sea:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=tvrXVEkoa8U
        Designed by VARD Marine in Vancouver BC with a lot of foreign equipment, but somehow Jones Act compliant as long as it is built in USA, owned by an American company and crewed by Americans.
        These vessels are trying to compete with foreign vessels like the Normand Maximus for work in the US Gulf of Mexico.

        PS> The Harvey Blue Sea was named "Boat of the Year" at the Workboat Show in New Orleans recently: http://gcaptain.com/harvey-gulfs-new...eid=4674ba0fbe

        Comment


          I havn't been involved with pipe laying for quite some time and never with J-lay System in DP mode, but the principles for positioning are not that different from the old style S-lay system and anchors to move the barge along a planned trajectory. In both cases tensioners are key. The difference is how tension is maintained for a controlled lay down and touch point.
          Max. Tensioner capacity is always specified on the marketing brochure for any pipe layer.

          Difference between S-lay and J-lay systems:
          https://anakkelautan.wordpress.com/2...s-lay-methods/
          PS> Nice to see that the pictures used to illustrate the two systems are barges I have spent some time on board; LB 200 (now defunct) and Micoperi 7000 (Now Saipem 7000)

          But the question was about the way to ensure that the pipelay vessel move as required (IOW: maintain tension in the pipe to avoid buckling) and the method used for positioning:
          In case of Vertical Lay System (J-Lay) laying spooled pipe or cable from reel(s) the vessel maintain tension using engine power, DPS to maintain trajectory and DGPS to check position at all times. A second vessel may be used to check the "right-of-way" ahead of the pipelayer, or to ensure that the pipe/cable has been positioned correctly on the seabed, especially if there are prepared ditches for burrowing, or free-span that has been filled in.

          The speed of movement and engine power required to maintain tension is dependent on several factors. If laying spooled pipe/cable it is a continuous process, but if sections of pipes have to be welded in "on the fly" it is more dependent on the skills of the welders and whether "single jointing" or "double jointing".
          The LB 200 used double jointing, where 2 x 40' pipes (joints) were welded together and checked "off-line", than transferred to the "firing line" to be welded onto the completed pipeline, before going out over the stinger. When the Pipe Foreman sounded an alarm that he was ready to move, the Tower Operator would engage the 12 anchor winches and move the barge ahead 80', always maintaining tension, while the Tensioner Operator would ease up to allow the pipe to move. This would be repeated abt. every 15 min. on a good day with few repairs due to faulty welds.

          How they keep the right tension in the string of pipe/cable when J-laying in deep water? I'm not entirely familiar with this, but with all the computer power available on such vessels, I assume that the required tension is continuously calculated based on water depth and weather conditions etc. and monitored at the tensioners.
          The DP system ensure that the propulsion power required to maintain tension is always applied.
          Side thrusters ensure that the vessel maintain position and move along a predetermined line.
          A ROV may be deployed to check that the route ahead is free from obstruction.
          A second ROV may be deployed to check that the touchdown point is as per plan, if required.
          The DP system have a "Follow me" function, with the ROVs either following the ship, or the ship following the ROV, whichever is best.

          Some detail of the various NOV supplied Pipe Lay Systems:

          J-lay System:
          https://www.nov.com/Segments/Rig_Sys...ay_System.aspx

          Reel-lay System:
          https://www.nov.com/Segments/Rig_Sys...ay_System.aspx

          Vertical Lay System:
          https://www.nov.com/Segments/Rig_Sys...ay_System.aspx

          Horizontal Lay System:
          https://www.nov.com/Segments/Rig_Sys...ay_System.aspx

          The key component in all the above systems, Tensioners:
          https://www.nov.com/Segments/Rig_Sys...ensioners.aspx

          PS> The Normand Maximus has a Huisman system, but the principles are the same.

          Comment


          • Clipper
            Clipper commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks Ombugge. I've had a quick read and will come back to do some more learning after Christmas when I'm significantly less busy.

          Island Vanguard is getting ready to go back to work, doing DP Trials in Borgundfjorden today:


          A closer look:

          (Zoomed in that is)

          Comment


            Unknown offshore vessels seen at Valderoyfjorden yesterday:

            Comment


              It is such a delight to see such high-quality images like yours, Azimut. Nothing beats looking at crisp-clear images of ships of all kinds.
              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

              Comment


                As always, a high quality image from the north.

                Nice ship too. She has some impressive stats as well - nearly 100 meters long, and built in 2011.

                Skandi Gamma is a LNG powered Platform Supply Vessel (PSV) with NMD Standby Notation & Oilrec/NOFO Capabilities. The vessel has a Multi Application Cargo System (PG MACS) where tank capacities are dependent on configuration of tank modes and are maximized for each product (combined tanks).
                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                Comment


                  ''olympic taurus'' moored in Flushing the Netherlands

                  best regards Thijs

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by janihudi View Post
                    ''olympic taurus'' moored in Flushing the Netherlands

                    Great capture, Thijs! Is that white crane on the dock behind or is the crane on board? See from other images online, the crane is on the ship.

                    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                    Comment


                    • janihudi
                      janihudi commented
                      Editing a comment
                      yep on the vessel

                    Farstad is up and running again after the oil-"crisis" of the last year or so - which is good.

                    Thanks for sharing this image, Azimut!
                    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                    Comment


                    • ombugge
                      ombugge commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Farstad is NOT up and running, it has been absorbed into Solstad, which have been taken over by Rokke and Jon Fredriksen.

                    ''fortitude'' moored in Rotterdam at a privat quay



                    best regards Thijs

                    Comment


                      Here is a link for anybody that is interested in the history of offshore vessels from the earliest beginning until today:
                      http://www.refvik.info/Forum8/OSVVes...2018-05-16.pdf
                      This should bring you to a pdf version which is not easy to use for research. I'll look to see if there is an interactive version to be had without costing an arm an a leg.

                      Comment


                        ''Nao Prosper'' inbound for flushing

                        home port Alesund,you would have seen her there too Ombugge

                        https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais...6c46a4a88394d7



                        best regards Thijs

                        Comment


                        • ombugge
                          ombugge commented
                          Editing a comment
                          No I have not seen this one in person. She is one that was built on specs by Ulstein and sold to NOA, but managed by Remoy Management in Fosnavaag.
                          She have probably never been in her homeport, at least not since new.
                      Working...
                      X