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World's OFFSHORE VESSELS

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    Not too many changes from my last post, but two of the vessels alongside Storkaia has Christmas visitors moored outside.
    Nice sunelight in Kristiansund today gave rather ok images, I think.

    On Gomalandet I found KL BROFJORD, SKANDI ICEMAN and ISLAND INTERVENTION










    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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      ISLAND INTERVENTION also at Gomalandet together with the two reds


      EDDA FAUNA at Devoldholmen ro-ro quay


      Details from EDDA FAUNA, the retracted gangway port side and mess windows


      REM FORTRESS. I figured I could just as well go b/w in this strong head light


      REM FORTRESS and SJOBORG


      In this 90-degree shot, the differences in size and design are obvious
      "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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        Colourful alongside Storkaia


        As seen from the Sørsundet bridge




        Differences in the bridge size. The windows on top of the bridge of the outer one there, is the crew dayroom


        "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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          Shipspotting on Christmas Day! Gotta love that Sterkoder! Lots of christmassy colour but I do like that b&w a lot too, and Island Intervention #1542/1 is my "I wish I’d taken that" choice, not just because there's a seagull, honestly , though I must say that tiny detail does kind of balance the bottom left triangle perfectly. Moreover the square format suits the ship. Yes, I'm liking that one more and more.

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            A sad sight:

            The UT 704 Pacific Jaguar in a terminal lay-up situation.

            A closer look:


            I have worked with this one many times in the past, when she looked like this:


            Built in Spain and for Spanish Owners in 1976. CHARO DEL MAR until 1990 Dec. ALPHA 802 until 1994 May.

            Finally, some of the UT 704s are heading for the breakers, but the majority of the 93 such vessels built is still in use.
            In fact, one UT 704 was sold for further trading this week;
            Ocean Prince, which has featured on this tread many times, since she was based in Kristiansund.

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              More sad pictures of Pacific Jaguar and other veteran Offshore vessels, all of which I have worked with in the past.
              Different view of the Superstructure and Bridge of Pacific Jaguar:




              A view along the deck:





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              • ombugge
                ombugge commented
                Editing a comment
                I thought I had posted the history of the UT 704 design somewhere here before, but I cannot find it.
                This was the start of the modern OSVs as we know them now. Before the UT 704 it was mostly US designed and built boats, with a few European built boats along the same lines.

                Here is a link to a site giving the background for this development and a list of the vessels built to the UT 704 design and their present names. (Not up to date): http://www.shipsandoil.com/features/featut704.htm

                One more link: http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/guides.../Supply_Vessel

              She is not alone in this predicament. Another UT design, the AHT Natuna Panther:





              ex Tender Power, built at Surken, Papenburg in 1975/76. She was state of the art and one of the most powerful Anchor Handlers in the North Sea in her days.

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                More old relics of early North Sea vintage:






                Big Orange XIX (with the large dome) is still active:

                Built at Santan Shipyard, Singapore in 1982 as a Well Stimulation Vessel.

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                  On a happier note; Swire Pacific Offshore in Singapore has in existence or on order 8 large AHTS of Havyard design.
                  The vessels are built in Singapore, but with design and equipment mostly from Norway. The last of this series will be delivered in the early part of 2014:
                  http://www.swire.com.sg/Media/News-A...Class-ves.aspx

                  Here is a link to SOP's web site with details of the D-class vessels: http://www.swire.com.sg/Fleet/AHT-AHTS/D-Class.aspx

                  The first one, Pacific Defiance seen at DDW Pax-Ocean Shipyard in Tuas this week:


                  A sister ship is still under construction at the same yard:


                  Pacific Duchess leaving from ST Marine yard in Benoi Basin, Singapore for sea trials:

                  Assisted by tugs until in "open waters" before the engines are started.

                  She is on her way under own power for the first time:

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                    "Troms Artemis" in Stavanger. This is a Troms Offshore vessel, and Troms Offshore is actually the former TFDS offshore.


                    P1190091 by The Sea-Otter, on Flickr


                    P1190109 by The Sea-Otter, on Flickr


                    P1190102 by The Sea-Otter, on Flickr

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                      I always thought red was the best light for eyes at night, or at least it is so in aviation. But I guess since blue means nothing in naval navigation, that was the correct colour to choose.
                      Here's SKANDI GAMMA tonight.

                      "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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                        Some Offshore Vessels seen at Loyang Offshore Base, Singapore today.

                        The idle vessels are on the move to let one out:


                        The Maintenance vessel Berani heaving anchor:


                        A look along the pier, with a the Hallin CSV Carlisle waiting to get back in the line:


                        DOF Subseas's CSV Skandi Hercules on one side of the finger pier:






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                          Swiber's CSV Kreuz Installer on the other side:



                          Built as Sebex One in Germany in 1981. She has had many names and been modified many times over the years.

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                            Western Geco's Seismic Vessel GECO Eagle was Ship of the year in 1999. Built in Bergen, Norway in 1999 for Geco-Prakla.
                            She is able to tow 16 streamers due to the wide upper deck at her stern:





                            Pakarang view:


                            Port side view:
                            Last edited by ombugge; February 11th, 2014, 02:37. Reason: correction

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                              Another day, another visit at Loyang Offshore Base, with some of the same Offshore vessels in place and some different ones to be seen.

                              Here is first an overview of the boats in the "idle" fleet:




                              A couple of sister ships here:


                              And one with a almighty name:


                              The outermost vessels:



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