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  • News about Ship Designs and Equipment

    We are in a fast changing world and new ideas are floated almost daily.
    Here is a thread to post any news on ideas, designs and equipment for the shipping and Offshore industry that you may come about.

    I'll start the ball rolling with this article in Naftrade, which was brought to my attention by the Maritime Group on LinkedIn today:
    http://www.naftrade.com/12/post/2013...mber_217839523

    Fairly realistic for Tankers and Bulkers, but would occupy too much valuable deck space on Container ships and Multi-purpose Cargo ships.

  • #2
    Re: News about Ship Designs and Equipment

    I have always wondered about sails that can not be fureled or lowered. I'm sure the rigid structure is efficient but I wonder about all that sail area that can not be lowered.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: News about Ship Designs and Equipment

      Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
      I have always wondered about sails that can not be fureled or lowered. I'm sure the rigid structure is efficient but I wonder about all that sail area that can not be lowered.
      These sails can be lowered until it all fits within the lowest section. This is necessary, both to furl them when the wind is too strong, or from an adverse direction, and when in port.
      This is done by a telescopic mast within the sails (or wings) and is fully mechanical, controlled from a Computer on the Bridge. Likewise, the angle of the sails are adjusted automatically to obtain the optimum "pulling force" under all conditions.
      For Bulk Carriers and Tankers this can work. They don't have any stability issues and does not carry deck cargo.
      It cannot replace the engine, just reduce the fuel consumption when there is suitable wind condition.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: News about Ship Designs and Equipment

        This is a radical new development, isn't it? I'm surprised at their forecast for an ocean voyage from 2016 onwards, even if it is of the prototype. But then, of course, they do point out that the basic research has already been done.
        Very interesting.
        Ivy

        "To thine own self be true.......
        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: News about Ship Designs and Equipment

          I posted something from smp.no on this new innovation by Ulstein, but it does not harm to repeat it here and in English: http://www.maritime-executive.com/pr...ay-2013-03-13/

          "Head-up display" is not new, but the use of it on the bridge of vessels are.

          Will this become the new "normal"??
          Maybe on Offshore vessels built or designed by Ulstein, but not likely to be widely used on ordinary ships, or on offshore vessels world wide in the near future.
          Last edited by ombugge; March 21st, 2013, 03:49.

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          • #6
            Re: News about Ship Designs and Equipment

            Sail on Cruise Ships is not new but her is STX Europe's take on a Ecofriendly large Cruise Ship: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImawfvSsEmk

            STX Europe being a leader in the construction of Cruise Ships, realization may be more realistic than it looks at first glans.

            With fuel cost being high and likely stay there, and with new regulation for SOX, NOX and CO2 emission coming into force, this should be music to the ears for large Cruise Operators.

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            • #7
              Re: News about Ship Designs and Equipment

              i don't even know if we have a icebreaker thread,but it wil fit better here.

              http://gcaptain.com/aker-arctics-arc100hd-powerful/
              best regards Thijs

              Comment


              • #8
                Automated ships will "soon" be a reality??

                From Maasmond Newsletter today:
                The next revolution in cargo will be the container ship drone Drones will revolutionize transportation. Driverless cars are expected to be on the streets by the end of the decade, and as discussed ad infinitum this month, Amazon wants to deliver products to your doorstep using unmanned aerial systems. Now, the British engineering group Rolls Royce wants unmanned, remote-controlled ships to transport freight and goods across the seas. “The idea of a remote-controlled ship is not new, it has been around for decades but the difference is the technology now exists,” Rolls Royce’s head of marine innovation Oskar Levander, told the FT in an interview (paywall). ”It is happening in other industries so it is only logical that it should happen in marine.” When it comes to predictions about the adoption of new transformative products, technologists have been repeatedly and spectacularly wrong. But that’s usually due to them being too conservative, rather than unduly optimistic. That’s as good a reason as any to believe the drone hype. Still, there are plenty of hurdles that need to be cleared before drones can crack the mainstream. There’s a long list of reasons why it will be difficult for unmanned aerial drones to be used for residential product deliveries (especially by 2015, which is Amazon’s hopeful start date), including prohibitive costs and strict regulations. Drone cargo ships face their own obstacles, including inordinately complex international maritime laws. Yet the prospect of significant cost savings and fewer accidents might be enough to entice the industry to continue to pursue the idea. Ships with no human crew would appear to be highly vulnerable to attacks from pirates. One way to protect them? More drones. The US has been deploying unmanned surveillance planes to ward off pirates off the coast east Africa for years. There are now even drone boats designed specifically to hunt down pirates. Source: Quartz

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                • #9
                  I will believe it when I see it. Automation is fine when everything is working properly or when loss of the vehicle is acceptable. Up the stakes to loss of valuable cargo or environmental disaster and automation is still not capable enough.

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                  • ombugge
                    ombugge commented
                    Editing a comment
                    The problem is not so much the automation per se, but the legal requirements that govern Maritime activity in International waters.
                    Having a ship cross the Atlantic or Pacific without any crew on board can be done, but not by present day ships, which is designed and equipped to be operated by a small crew.
                    The engine room is already automated to where it is left unmanned for 48 hrs. or more, but the Bridge must still be manned at all times according to international rules and regulations.

                • #10
                  The world's most ridiculous ship??: http://gcaptain.com/susitna-worlds-r...s-up-for-sale/
                  It is for sale, but not to just anyone. Nobody that may be "suspicious", or seen as as such, may apply.

                  Anybody who qualify and have a need for a fast transport vessel to carry rolling cargo to/from places with no port facilities, but a suitable beach?

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                  • #11
                    The "Father" of the modern Offshore Vessels has finally been honoured for his innovative designs and ability to listen to the people that is actually using the vessels he design: http://www.smp.no/naeringsliv/article9185523.ece

                    His ideas and designs have been instrumental in the development of the to modern and complicated vessels we see today. The UT 704 design started it off in 1974.

                    I have had the honour of working with him on the design of a large Krill Trawler many years ago. (Never actually built, but I still have the drawings and building specifications, just in case)

                    As far as I know he is still active.

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                    • #12
                      Rolls-Royce is working on the technology for unmanned Cargo ships of the future: http://gcaptain.com/rolls-royce-test...Captain.com%29

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                      • #13
                        How about this for a future design..... a nice concept or plain ugly?

                        Opinions not needed..... taste is a highly individual matter.

                        http://www.skipsrevyen.no/ny-design-fra-oilcraft/
                        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                        Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                        Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          The big question is of course will it work and provide improvement over todays designs?
                          Not too bad if you ask me.

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            NORLINES brand new KITBJØRN will be gas-powered and soon a common sight at the coast of Norway:

                            http://www.nrk.no/nordnytt/nor-lines...ift-1.11583746
                            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                            Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                            Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                            Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                            Comment

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