Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

World's NAVY SHIPS

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Russia still has some interesting vessels in service:

    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

    Comment


      New ship for Norway:

      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

      Comment


        EGYPT buys a former Norwegian war ship at auction, the KNM Horten:

        http://www.adressa.no/nyheter/innenr...cle1511726.ece

        If anyone wants a translation, please do let me know, and I'll make one!
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

        Comment


          HNLMS M 859 Hellevoetsluis en route Den Helder


          Jack Mulder

          Comment


            HNLMS Abraham Crijnssen.


            Built: 1937 Scheepswerf Gusto, Schiedam
            At the start of WW II the Abraham Crijnssen served in the Indonesian waters, March 1942 under Command of LTCDR I. van Miert preps were taken to sail for Australia. The ship was painted in camouflage colours, covered with nets and parts of trees, disguised as a Tropical Island. March 6th 1942 the Abraham Crijnssen left Soerabaja and sailed for Australia. In the morning of March the 7th they observed Hr.Ms. Eland Dubois and Hr.Ms. Jan van Amstel not camouflaged near the Islands Gili Radja. The Commanding officer of the Abraham Crijnssen decided to Anker by the Island Gili Getting. At Gili Getting fresh water was taken in the camouflage refreshed. By sailing during the night and Anker during daylight they arrived March 9th North West of Soembawa. They landed the Island Soembawa to load Coconuts. The same night they passed the Street of Atlas, arrived at the Indian Ocean and steamed direct to Australia. March 15th 1942 the ship arrived at the Australian Port Geraldton. From this Port she acts as patrol ship until August 16th. From August 26th 1942 until May 5th 1943 she served in the Australian Navy. June 7th 1945 Abraham Crijnssen sailed from Sydney with the Dutch submarine K IX on tow. Unfortianaly the rope broke and the K IX stranded.
            1995 the Abraham Crijnssen is donated to the Dutch Navy Museum in Den Helder and still to visit there.
            The Abraham Crijnssen was one of the van Amstel class.
            Hr.Ms. Jan van Amstel (1937 - 1942)
            Hr.Ms. Pieter de Bitter (1937 - 1942)
            Hr.Ms. Abraham Crijnssen (1937 - 1961)
            Hr.Ms. Eland Dubois (1937 - 1942)
            Hr.Ms. Willem van Ewijck (1937 - 1939) sunk by mine
            Hr.Ms. Pieter Florisz (1937 - 1962) (1940 - 1945 served in German Navy)
            Hr.Ms. Jan van Gelder (1937 - 1961)
            Hr.Ms. Abraham van der Hulst (1937 - 1940) (1940 - 1945 served in German Navy)

            Jack Mulder

            Comment


              It's been a very interesting study looking through this thread from beginning to the last post. War ships has certainly changed over the years.

              Think of the vessels, and types of war ships, from the start of second world war till now: from the great battleships, to the small but stealthiest cruisers and motor torpedo boats.

              Warfare at sea has evolved. Where will we be in 70 years from now, do you think?
              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

              Comment


                Originally posted by pakarang View Post
                It's been a very interesting study looking through this thread from beginning to the last post. War ships has certainly changed over the years.

                Think of the vessels, and types of war ships, from the start of second world war till now: from the great battleships, to the small but stealthiest cruisers and motor torpedo boats.

                Warfare at sea has evolved. Where will we be in 70 years from now, do you think?
                Hopefully warships will be obsolete, together with the wars they are supposed to fight in.
                There cannot be a more stupid way of settling differences between nations then to go shooting at each other with more and more lethal weapons, sophisticated planes, rockets and ships.

                Comment


                  HNLMS M 861 Urk


                  Jack Mulder

                  Comment


                    HNLMS M 862 Zierikzee


                    Jack Mulder

                    Comment


                      All the way from Europe, to South East Asia: some news from Thailand:


                      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                      Comment


                        New built patrol vessels for the Royal Netherlands Navy.
                        The Holland Class will consist out of four units:

                        P 840 Holland built by Royal Schelde Shipyard, Vlissingen

                        P 841 Zeeland built by Royal Schelde Shipyard, Vlissingen

                        P 842 Friesland built by Damen Shipyard, Galati (Romania)

                        P 843 Groningen built by Damen Shipyard, Galati (Romania)




                        Jack Mulder
                        Last edited by Jack Mulder; August 31st, 2010, 19:24.

                        Comment




                          Each country faces a unique set of circumstances that influences OPV procurement decisions, Yarker believes. He added that the OPV market has not increased in size as "the only people that have come into the OPV market that were not there before are the New Zealanders and the Dutch, who have accepted a capability reduction in their fleet".

                          In September 2003, the Netherlands decided to reduce the capability of its navy and set in motion the sale of four Karel Doorman M-class frigates, intending to replace them with smaller patrol vessels. Dutch shipbuilder Schelde Naval Shipbuilding was contracted in December 2007 to build four OPVs for the Royal Netherlands Navy under Project Patrouilleschepen that are due to enter into service from 2011-13.

                          The ships will be equipped with fewer combat systems than their predecessors and have been designed for patrol, surveillance and interdiction operations in the Netherlands EEZ, Netherlands Antilles and Aruba. According to Schelde, the new patrol ships will be 108 m long and displace some 3,750 tonnes, which would make them larger than the 3,320 ton frigates they replace.

                          The ships will have a maximum speed of 21.5 kt and will support expeditionary forces ashore with space for an NH90 helicopter, two 12 m rigid-hulled inflatable boats (RHIBs) and one fast rescue boat. Armaments include a single 76 mm gun, a 20-30 mm gun and two machine guns. The vessels will be built to commercial standards, but will feature added ballistic protection and a gas citadel. Crewed by 50 personnel, the patrol ships will have additional accommodation for 40 people and space for 100 evacuees.

                          Lean machine
                          Schelde owner Damen has divided the construction of the four ships equally between Schelde's facilities at Vlissingen in the Netherlands and the Galati shipyard in Romania. The ships are halfway through the detailed engineering stage and steel-cutting began in both Galati and Vlissingen in August 2008, with the keel laying for the first ship anticipated in November.

                          Leon Goossens, manager of product development at Schelde, told Jane's that the development of OPVs will include more high-speed interceptors for boarding operations and drug-trafficking interdictions. Goossens believes the development of "the integrated single-mast configuration in top-side designs will continue not only for the larger OPVs and frigates, but also for the smaller coastal or littoral patrol vessels".

                          "Electrical propulsion will be adopted on patrol vessels for cruising speed as auxiliary propulsion and in the future also for main propulsion with multiple generating sets, possibly adopting a battery concept for power supply from different kinds of modular energy sources."

                          A reduction in crew size can be achieved through increased levels of automation in both the platform and combat systems, and through the reduced onboard maintenance needed on modular equipment and systems. Goossens said that modularity principles will be applied to a ship's configuration to a higher degree to allow for increased commonality and the exchange of systems between ships - even between those of different sizes - as well as to facilitate the upgrade process.

                          The Damen Group has been contracted to build three emergency response vessels for the Swedish Coast Guard. These patrol vessels are specifically designed as multipurpose vessels for normal coastguard duties along the major shipping lanes from St Petersburg, the Baltic Sea and into the North Sea, but also with capabilities for emergency response activities.

                          The first two ships were contracted on 21 December 2005, with a third vessel with chemical recovery capabilities contracted in April 2007. The 81 m-long vessels have Ice Class 1AS capabilities, but are not intended as ice breakers. They are capable of carrying out rescue operations; firefighting; towing; oil containment, with 600 m of ocean boom; oil recovery (capacity of about 400 tons of crude oil per hour); lighterage of crude oil; remotely operated vehicle operations; and bottle diving support operations. The vessels are also equipped with two fast patrol boats and a heavy crane for recovery duties.

                          Schelde said the first ship, KBV 001, is nearing completion and will commence trials in November 2008, with delivery expected in December or early January 2009. KBV 002 has been launched and delivery will take place five months after KBV 001. The third ship, KBV 003, is still under construction. KBV 001 is due to commission in the first quarter of 2009, with KBV 003 expected to commission by the end of the same year.
                          ......

                          Sticking to these principles does not mean that a ship cannot have good growth potential. Space and weight can be provided for systems that have not actually been fitted, allowing for future flexibility - as in the case of the large Dutch OPVs.

                          * 76 mm Oto Melara (1x)
                          * 27 mm MARLIN Oto Melara (1x)
                          * 12,7 mm Hitrole Oto Melara .50 cal (2x)
                          * 7.62mm MAG Machine Gun (6X)
                          * 1 NH-90 ship borne helicopter
                          * 1 slipway launched RHIB
                          * 1David Launched RHIB



                          Jack Mulder
                          Last edited by Jack Mulder; August 31st, 2010, 19:27.

                          Comment


                            Interesting with the story, drawings, models and all, Jack..., thank you!!!

                            Anyone, and Bengt in particular:
                            Did you observe the US Navy frigate USS "Taylor" today...?
                            It was reported that she was steaming towards Tromsø at high speed earlier this Wednesday

                            Picture from FFG-50s homepage:
                            "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
                              Anyone, and Bengt in particular:
                              Did you observe the US Navy frigate USS "Taylor" today...?
                              It was reported that she was steaming towards Tromsø at high speed earlier this Wednesday

                              Picture from FFG-50s homepage:
                              And look, she is making an S in your honor!
                              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                              Comment


                                HNLMS P 840 Holland built by Royal Schelde Shipyard, Vlissingen.
                                Still in Dock.

                                For the first time outdoor.





                                Jack Mulder
                                Last edited by Jack Mulder; September 2nd, 2010, 11:50.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X