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  • ombugge
    started a topic Towage and Marine Operations

    Towage and Marine Operations

    Since it is Sunday and I have the time, I'll add a little history to the thread and a very different operation from what we have seen before on CV forum. This is two major towage operations I was involved with while working as Tow Master for Micoperi SpA in 1989. Both operations were in Norway.
    The first was the Veslefrikk Jacket tow from Vaerdal to Songnesjoen and on to the Veslefrikk Field in the North Sea.

    The Barge used was "M-44", 180 m. Loa and abt. 60,000 Dwt. owned by Micoperi.
    The Veslefrikk jacket was abt. 9,300 m.t. in weight (9,800 m.t. including slings and spreaders) and built to be lifted, not launched, from the barge. Finally to be up-ended and placed over a pre-drilled template on the seabed in abt. 175 m. water depth. This operation was performed by the Crane Vessel "Micoperi 7000" (now "Saipem 7000"), which is able to lift 14,000 m.t. in ideal conditions. This was to be a world record lift for a Crane Vessel.
    Only a couple of months before the operation was to be performed it was found that the possibilities of getting good enough weather to do the lifting operation on the offshore field was only 2%, even in the months of May or June. All plans had to be changed and the lifting was performed inshore, in Sognesjoen, where the conditions were suitable. The problem was that the jacket was not designed to be towed and nobody had any experience with such towing operations over such distances. Lots of fast track engineering was needed.
    We left Vaerdal sometime in early May, 1989 and proceeded to Grip through the inshore route. Unfortunately I don't have a lot of pics available so this will have to be describe with some text. This is the first pics I have available, leaving Grip Pilot station and trying to stabilize the tow behind the towing vessel "Viking Queen". (The assisting vessel in one of the Viking Supplyship boats but I cannot remember which)

    Remember, under that jacket is a 60,000 Dwt. barge.

    As we proceeded the weather forecast suddenly changed to a force 9 gale and I decided to seek shelter in Vartdalsfjorden, near Aalesund, where we spent three days circling while waiting for the gale to blow itself out.
    We eventually arrived in Sognesjoen, where the M-7000 was getting ready to lift:

    Due to the width of the jacket and the weight we had to ballast down the barge until the stern was under water to be able to clear the cribbing. I had the "honour" of walking along the barge deck to check that there was clearance all along. I can tell you that you feel small when walking under 9,800 m.t. of jacket hanging in two cranes, but I did wear my hard hat and safety booths.
    Once I had towed the barge away from under the lift, the jacket was lowered into the water until it was afloat on its own buoyancy and we moved it away to prepare for the tow to field, which was something like 30-40 n.miles out of the fjord and 120 n.miles offshore.
    This is a pics of the jacket afloat but not yet ballasted down to the required towing attitude:


    We use four tugs for this job, but I cannot recall all the names. Two were towing at the "top end" and two was attached to towlines at the bottom end, ready to take over if we should have and problems on the main tugs. Viking Queen was still my lead tug. We had an uneventful tow in good weather. (Sorry, no pics of the actual towing operation)
    This is the sight as we approached M-7000, now in position to receive the jacket under the cranes:


    This is the Veslefrikk Field in operation. The only field in the North Sea with a floating production unit and a "slim jacket" with only the drilling rig on top.

    That skinny little bit right at the bottom below the cellar deck is all that is visible of the jacket.
    Last edited by ombugge; October 9th, 2010, 11:03.

  • wherrygirl
    commented on 's reply
    Still wouldn't work. But I got on to the site's home page where they had thumbnail pics. of their videos and the Johan Sverdrup Field one was there. Watched it and another similar one without any problem! Strange, Cecilia, that you can see it from Ombugge's link yet I can't down here! Excellent viewing, anyway.
    Thanks for the explanations, Ombugge.

  • ombugge
    commented on 's reply
    Stinger is a "ramp" that is used to guide the pipes over the stern of a pipe laying vessel.
    The PS probably have the biggest and heaviest stinger of them all.

  • Seagull
    commented on 's reply
    Video working ok here Ivy.

    Indeed a very impressive operation.

  • wherrygirl
    commented on 's reply
    Can't get this video going. It comes up, the circle performs endlessly but nothing moves. Those in your two previous posts are OK though I had only a quick peep for now. Will try again later as this video should be stunning.
    By the way, what on earth is a stinger? Google has various ideas but not this one!
    Also by the way: if it's to the dislike of the Donald then that's fine by me.

  • ombugge
    replied
    For those who like to watch big offshore projects, here is Allsea's own videos from the installation of topsides in the Johan Sverdrup Field last year and last week:
    https://allseas.com/
    The Pioneering Spirit is now going back to R'dam to pick up her stinger and on the Baltic to lay pipe for the Nordstream 2 project. (Much to the dislike of Donald Trump)

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    replied
    The final installation on the Johan Sverdrup Field was completed in 72 hrs.:
    https://www.oilfieldtechnology.com/o...-field-centre/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=F0FKgruFnQo

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    replied
    A video from way back in 1960 showing life on board the tug Zwarte Zee during towage of the 12-legged Jackup rig Mr. Louis from Gulf of Mexico to Bremerhaven:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FbHR...&feature=share

    At the very beginning there are also pictures of some other early offshore rigs, incl. the earliest LeTourneau 3-legged rig Mr. Cap, easily recognised by the helideck on top of the bow leg. That one later became Chris Seager, working off Brunei, on which I did several rigmoves in 1975-77.

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    replied
    Marine operations in the not so good old days:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xeY8X6nQQ3k

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vibLDLgCw9I

    The boats and equipment were a lot simpler and more dangerous back in them days.
    Last edited by ombugge; February 11th, 2019, 00:57.

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    replied
    A major marine operation is getting under way in Denmark:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=30RECLGlTOg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmP9Ez-u9SM

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    replied
    Originally posted by ombugge View Post
    Another interesting towing operation along the Norwegian coast will be performed soon:
    http://www.kystverket.no/Nyheter/201...mik-lomonosov/
    Probably with less publicity though.
    They are now just passing Aalesund, but outside Storegga.
    PS> Being escorted by Boa Odin.

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    Originally posted by ombugge View Post
    On the other end of the world Nick Sloan is planning to tow ice bergs to Cape Town to slack the thirst of the population there:
    http://gcaptain.com/the-guy-who-rais...eid=4674ba0fbe
    Pretty amazing turn of events if you think about. We (more like "they") must be in a very desperate situation - and I know they are - to even consider this as their current and perhaps only option.

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    commented on 's reply
    The Aasta Hansteen SPAR is now moored in position with 17 anchor lines:
    https://sysla.no/offshore/na-er-plat...rce=pushvarsel
    Next the risers will be pulled in to connect it to the wells on the seabed and the Nordled pipeline to the mainlands.

  • ombugge
    replied
    On the other end of the world Nick Sloan is planning to tow ice bergs to Cape Town to slack the thirst of the population there:
    http://gcaptain.com/the-guy-who-rais...eid=4674ba0fbe

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    replied
    Another interesting towing operation along the Norwegian coast will be performed soon:
    http://www.kystverket.no/Nyheter/201...mik-lomonosov/
    Probably with less publicity though.

    Leave a comment:

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