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    Thank you for the link to Bulk Viking. I always thought it was interesting to see a standard hydraulic excavator sitting on top. Now it makes a little more sense.

    I suppose the excavator is a standard, well proven design. It is probably less expensive and more reliable to buy the land model and set it on top of the ship instead of the shipyard designing and building one into the ship.

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      Surprised to see that the have the discharging conveyor swung out while under way. Assume they are making short trips in protected waters, but still not a seamen-like way of doing things.

      Comment


        Originally posted by ombugge View Post
        Surprised to see that the have the discharging conveyor swung out while under way. Assume they are making short trips in protected waters, but still not a seamen-like way of doing things.
        They had lowered the discharging conveyor just a few minutes before and was going to port 5 minutes later.
        Best wishes from
        Bengt Domben

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          FV "Skottind" on her way south this morning.



          FV "Ontika" on her way north today.



          FV "Dag-Senior" on her way north this afternoon.

          Best wishes from
          Bengt Domben

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            "Jan Mayen" on her way out from Tromsø this evening for a marine reasearch trip.

            Best wishes from
            Bengt Domben

            Comment


              It looks like the "Dag Senior" is rigged for Whaling. Has the season started already?

              Comment


                Originally posted by ombugge View Post
                It looks like the "Dag Senior" is rigged for Whaling. Has the season started already?
                Catch of minke whale in 2009

                Fisheries and Coastal Affairs has set quotas for the catch of minke whale in 2009. Vessels that are allowed to participate can catch to the 885 minke in Norway's economic zone, the fish protection zone of Svalbard, in the fishing zone of Jan Mayen and in international waters. Harvesting period is from 1. April and should be completed within 31 August 2009.
                Best wishes from
                Bengt Domben

                Comment


                  Whare minki whales used for in the modern world? I can only imagine they are sold the the Japanese.

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                    "Arnøytrans" in Kristiansund today. This vessel is a live fish carrier, and read this: Her hull is riveted and was yardnr. 429 at Aker in Oslo in 1926.
                    She has a Caterpillar 3412 of 615 BHP from 1999 and she is capable of 9,5 knots consuming 70 liters of diesel pr. hour.
                    (Yes, I'm easily impressed of such old vessels still going strong).


                    Guardvessel "4 Winds"


                    "Acergy Petrel"


                    "Svealand" arrived Sterkoder Shipyard in the evening sun. Note: Her main mast is down. Don't know why).




                    Finally, "Acergy Falcon" came in today.

                    All pictures: ©S. Ludvigsen
                    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
                      Whare minki whales used for in the modern world? I can only imagine they are sold the the Japanese.
                      Norwegians eat Whale Meat, but some is probably being exported to Japan?
                      I believe the blubber is still used to produce Whale Oil, but don't really know what it is used for today?

                      The last Norwegian expedition to the Southern Ocean was sometime in the mid/late 1960's with a purposebuilt combined hunter/factory called Peder Huse.
                      The last Whaling station in Southern Norway was at Steinshamn and also closed around the same time.
                      There is a very interesting story here, but possibly under a different thread.

                      Asimut can possibly enlighten us on all things about modern Whaling in Norway and Iceland?

                      Comment


                        Whale meat? Where? I'm always open to a new culinary experience!! Would I look for it when I'm in Longyearbyen?

                        Comment


                          Norwegian minke whale catch

                          Harvesting of whales and seals have always been an important part of the settlement basis on the Norwegian coast. After a stay of five years for studies of population basis, the government decided that the catch of minke whale were to resume in 1993. The decision built on work done by the International Whaling organization's science committee. In 2004, the minke whale population in the areas in the Northeast and Central Atlantic Ocean, where Norway driver catch estimated at 107 000 animals - big NOK to provide a basis for sustainable harvesting. Total population in the Central Atlantic was in 2001 estimated by the North Atlantic marine mammals Commission (NAMMCO) to 63 500 animals.

                          Minke whale harvesting is carried out by fishermen, and whale hunting boat is a traditional fishing boat together rigged for whaling, with a crew of 3 - 8 persons.

                          Minke whales are the smallest of bardehvalene and the meat goes for human consumption. The catch is being different from the capital-intensive industry capture of the larger species of whale that has now ceased and where whale oil was the main product.

                          A "green" industry "

                          Harvesting of fish and marine mammals with selective gear is an environmentally friendly way to produce food. The assumption is that all trapping occurs in the proper scale. Minke whale is not a threatened species, and the Norwegian authorities leads today a restrictive and conservation-oriented resource policies.

                          Norway in the IWC

                          In 1982 adopted the International Whaling Commission (IWC) catch a peak (moratorium) for commercial whaling with effect from 1986. Norway reserved against this, but imposed a temporary halt in the minke whale catch from 1987 in anticipation of better knowledge on population size. Science Committee of the IWC have been both more reliable population estimates and a revised management procedure, but the Commission has since 1990 still not been willing to reconsider Moratoriet and catch quotas.

                          The Norwegian quotas are based on the Science Committee's revised management procedure is in 2007 at 1,052 animals including unused quota from the years 2004-2006.

                          Reservation to capture the top is founded in Article V of the Whaling Convention. Norway's legal right to drive minke whale catch is therefore not disputed. The Convention's stated purpose is to "increase the number of whales that can be captured without putting resources at risk." Harvesting levels should both "based on scientific data," safeguard "the protection, development and optimum utilization of whale resources" and "take into account the interests of consumers of whale products". Hvalfangstkonven administration purposes is m.a.o. not to protect whales for their own sake, but to regulate the catch so that the people's interests are safeguarded, both today and in the future.

                          Minke whale, one of many whale species

                          All in all there are 75-80 species of whale. Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) occur in all the world and is the smallest of the 10 species known as bardehvaler. It can be 10 meters long, will, on average, one young a year and eat the plankton and fish. IWC estimates the population in the areas around Antarctica to 750 000 animals. In North and Central Atlantic, where the acquisition takes place, the population is estimated at respectively 107 000 and 72 000 animals (2004). (New population estimates coming in 2008.) Minke whale can be observed along the Norwegian coast throughout the winter. In the spring pulls the north to the Barents Sea and Arctic Ocean to feed on the abundant fish and plankton populations until they go south again in autumn.

                          Capture and killing

                          Minke whale catch in Norway, as a rule, in that boat either lie down and wait for the whale to come in range, or maneuvered toward the point where it is expected to come to the surface the next time.

                          It was in his time raised criticism against the killing methods, and it has been a major effort to improve them so that the animal dies quickly. Norway has always been a pioneer, and methods in the Norwegian minke whale catch today is fully on a par with or better than, those used in other big game hunting. This applies both to how quickly death occurs, and the proportion of animals that are harmful to animals. Killing methods are not back to those applied to domestic animals in the slaughterhouse.

                          Most animals lose consciousness or die instantly or very quickly. In a survey from 1999 was 72% of animals registered as "instantaneous death", ie, they stopped moving and sank. However, this is a poor criterion for determining when death occurs, and that there is research to improve the criteria. Preliminary results indicate that around 80% of the animals lose consciousness or die instantly. Well 10% survive the first shot and must be killed with second shot or with rifle shots. Efforts continue to reduce this proportion.

                          Each year, before acquisition begins, all skyttere attend a course where the shooting and killing is a central theme. In addition, it is required to shoot with both trying Harpun gun and rifle. All ships have electronic monitoring of the catch.

                          Brief History

                          Minke whale catch in developing countries mentioned in written sources already in the 800-number, catch with Harpun were common in 1200-century. Motor decline of the fishing fleet in the 1920-year støtet gave to the modern minke whale catch.

                          In 1938, it was introduced to the licensing requirements. On 1950-tallet kom rules on the maximum catch per boat and regulations that licensees would be fishermen who owned the boats and even participated in the catch. In 1976 it was introduced annual maximum quotas.

                          Quota for the catch of minke whales in 2009

                          Fisheries and Coastal Minister has fixed a quota of 885 animals for the minke whale-catch in 2009.

                          The quota is slightly lower than in 2008. This has related to us in 2009 is entering a new administration period and can not transfer unused quota from last year. 885 animals is the basic annual quota for the five-year period from 2009 to 2013.

                          It will in 2009 be allowed to take up to 750 animals in areas along the coast and at Svalbard. The rest of the quota can be taken either in the zone of Jan Mayen.

                          The quota is based on population size one came forward to after telletokta the period 2003 - 2007. The model that is used by fastsetjing the quota is conservative. The quota is within an interval that researchers in the science committee of the International kvalfangst Commission (IWC) believes provide adequate safety with regard to the protection of the minkewhales we do catch on.

                          Fisheries and Coastal minister Helga Pedersen is expected IWCs science committee next year will complete work on the adjustment of the method for the calculation of catch quotas for minke whales and other bardekvalar. It is important for the Committee that the advice they give is based on the results of the latest research.


                          Ministry of Fisheries and Coastal Affairs(Norway)
                          Best wishes from
                          Bengt Domben

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by ehp View Post
                            Whale meat? Where? I'm always open to a new culinary experience!! Would I look for it when I'm in Longyearbyen?
                            I think you can get this in Lonyearbyen and naturally most of the places at the mainland of Norway.

                            I recommend this minke whale meat .This is a beautiful meat to eat.You have to try this ehp
                            Best wishes from
                            Bengt Domben

                            Comment


                              Bengt- thanks for that info!! I'm going to send it along to my family--love fun facts!!

                              Will DEFINITELY try it !!

                              Comment


                                For those with a special interest in the history of modern Whaling, here is a link to a FAO report covering the period from beginning of last century to present days: http://www.fao.org/docrep/005/y2684e/y2684e25.htm

                                It may be heavy reading but quite informative, in an official format.

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