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    Wot are you on about, man? Never once having Tweeted nor even looked at it I'm missing out somewhere. The other meaning of bird no doubt enters into it!
    Huh!
    Ivy

    "To thine own self be true.......
    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

    Comment


      Nah - just being silly. Birds twitter and tweet, so when you talked about having some birdie software, I automatically thought of that. Nothing sordid or intellectual, just the peculiar ramblings of a middle-aged man.
      Cheers,

      Mark.

      www.pologlover.co.uk

      Comment


      • nari
        nari commented
        Editing a comment
        How did women ever get referred to as "birds"?? In the heyday of the 60s it was endemic. Can't just be due to the tweeeting and twittttering....or was it?

      Originally posted by PoloUK View Post
      Nah - just being silly. Birds twitter and tweet, so when you talked about having some birdie software, I automatically thought of that. Nothing sordid or intellectual, just the peculiar ramblings of a middle-aged man.
      Ah, something nice and straightforward that I can understand! Ramble on, old chap.
      Ivy

      "To thine own self be true.......
      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

      Comment


        12 September 2016

        Colchicum, Autumn Crocus, Meadow Saffron, call it what you will.


        P1190981
        by Ivy, on Flickr

        The delicacy of this lovely bloom was emphasised this autumn, for the strong winds coinciding with heavy rain, just as they were coming into full flower, flattened them. They bloom for such a short period that it saddens me to see them crushed before I have time to really enjoy them.
        Ivy

        "To thine own self be true.......
        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

        Comment


        • pilotdane
          pilotdane commented
          Editing a comment
          What a beautiful splash of color.

        Lovely, delicate, tissue-thin petals, Ivy. Short-lived, but captured forever in your photo.

        Re 'Bird/Birds'. Wonder if it could be related to rhyming slang? 'Doing bird' is from 'bird lime' rhyming with 'time'.

        Just checked, it appears not to be. Here is a definition:
        bird (n.2) "maiden, young girl," c. 1300, confused with burd (q.v.), but felt by later writers as a figurative use of bird (n.1). Modern slang meaning "young woman" is from 1915, and probably arose independently of the older word.

        Comment


          Thank you very much,Dane. That's the trouble with Comments, if you aren't quick enough to see them in Latest Activity, you miss them as they don't show up in the main index.
          Ivy

          "To thine own self be true.......
          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

          Comment


            Thank you Paul.
            You made me look up "bird" in my dictionary and it says it was originally applied just to the young creature. O.E. brid, the young of a bird, or maybe just a bird. It also cross-referenced to burd, and there I found that an obsolete meaning was a maiden, a lady, or perhaps bryd (bride). Further, it says it was perhaps confused with O.N. meaning birth, or O.E. byrd meaning birth or offspring.
            Not content with that, apparently burd is Scottish for not just a bird but offspring, progeny, or is used as a term of endearment.
            So maybe the modern-day slang use of "bird" has found its way through all these possibilities and is not so far from the original meaning after all!
            Ivy

            "To thine own self be true.......
            Thou canst not then be false to any man."

            Comment


              Meanwhile... back to the original birds, sat in car yesterday afternoon and watched no fewer than 8 magpies hopping on and swooping from neighbours' roofs."8's a wish" as the rhyme goes, so I wish you all a very Merry Christmas!

              Comment


                Now you've set me off hunting again and I found this: http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/b...tingcrows.html
                I only remember, as applied to magpies::
                One for sorrow, two for joy,
                Three for good news, four from a boy.
                Yet browsing all the versions on that site, the line "Seven for a secret never to be told" is certainly familiar to me.
                Ivy

                "To thine own self be true.......
                Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                Comment


                  Hi, Ivy, haven't been on here for a spell. My recollections are from the 70s tv programme Magpie where the signature tune went as follows:

                  1 for sorrow
                  2 for joy
                  3 for a girl and
                  4 for a boy.
                  5 for silver
                  6 for gold
                  7 is a secret never to be told
                  Ma-a-a-ag-pieeeee.

                  8's a wish and
                  9's a kiss
                  10 is a bird you must not miss
                  Ma-a-a-ag-pieeeee.

                  How about that for a memory, eh? It used to be a favourite of mine, worth the dash home from school for.

                  This is from Wiki:
                  Theme song[edit]

                  The theme tune was played by the Spencer Davis Group under the alias of The Murgatroyd Band, and composed by Eddie Hardin (lead voc., keyb.), Ray Fenwick (harm. voc., guit.) and Spencer Davis (harm. voc.guit.). The main lyric was cribbed from an old children's nursery rhyme:
                  One for sorrow Two for joy Three for a girl Four for a boy Five for silver Six for gold Seven for a story never to be told Eight for Heaven Nine for Hell Ten for the Devil himself. or, alternatively,
                  Eight for a wish Nine for a kiss, and Ten for a big surprise! The first seven lines of this song (from "One for sorrow" to "Seven for a secret never to be told") have been used in the last verse of the song "Magpie", by Patrick Wolf.
                  The rhyme refers to an old English superstition concerning the portent of the number of magpies seen together in a flock. The TV programme version altered the final lines to:
                  Eight's a wish and Nine a kiss Ten is a bird you must not miss. (a tongue-in-cheek admonition not to miss future editions of Magpie).

                  Comment


                    A little tale of my favourite bird the robin. Visited the Rollright Stones, yesterday (just off A34, midway twixt Stratford upon Avon and Oxford). As we entered the site of the main stone circle a robin landed on the floor and we stopped to look at it. I took a stroll to see the remote Whispering Knight stones and on way back I was looking at the various different birds around, some I couldn't recognise (the path followed a huge cornfield). Then the robin alighted in a tree to the side of me so I stopped for a chat. It perched and tilted its head to listen to my attempts at mimicking its song, then it took off and made to come towards me, really seemed like it was intending landing on me as opposed to attacking me, but at last moment it changed its mind and decided it was being too brave, so returned to the tree. Wish I could have identified some of the others, as they were definitely not ones I usually see near our neck of the woods.

                    Comment


                      The Rollrights are a mystical place Paul - perhaps he was trying to tell you something!
                      Cheers,

                      Mark.

                      www.pologlover.co.uk

                      Comment


                      • Paul Cobb
                        Paul Cobb commented
                        Editing a comment
                        They certainly are, Mark. Intimate and with many legends attached. Who knows, you could be right!

                      Hope we haven't hijacked your Garden Patch thread, Ivy. How about an update?

                      Comment

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