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Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

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    Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

    18 June 2013

    I am a little concerned - and puzzled, too. A week or so ago there was a bee weaving to and fro in front of an old birdbox just by the small store down the end of the garden (actually it was once a loo). Birds have ignored it for years. Wondering what it was up to I carried on doing whatever it was I was supposed to be doing.
    Later I noticed that the bee was still there - to and fro, round and back again, to and fro. This carried on for several days, a week, two weeks. Gaining courage, I casually walked near it and peered up at the entrance. I know it had been completely empty but now some material of the type that birds use in nests, soft, mossy stuff, was visible through the hole. I withdrew, thankful that the bee hadn't seemed to object to this interloper.
    You may laugh, but some years ago I had found one of those bee groups that nest in holes in the ground. The hole was a fairly deep one as I had only a few weeks earlier taken out a small post there. There was much activity around the hole, bees dashing in and out, and being intrigued I had put out the garden chair and sat a few yards away watching.
    Then a bee doing a sort of guard duty flew near me and then back to its circling again. It repeated the action. I wondered whether I should move. Suddenly the bee really flew at my cheek and did I move then! It meant business.


    So I am cautious about this bird-box lot. There are now many bees to-ing and fro-ing with their nectar and it must be like a mini hive inside there! When several bees arrive they circle and dance around before entering and I wonder if this is the dance that bees perform with special movements to show the others the distance and direction of the flowers. I'm quite excited to see how it's all going to end. Will there eventually be a mini swarm with its queen? In which case what do I do about it? Bunga.y has a bee-keeping group and perhaps they can tell me.
    However, my problem is that my garden handbrush and my garden chair live in the store. I have ventured to open the door and extract the brush but have not yet dared to take out the chair. Well, it's a bit heavy and something in front of it has to be moved first, so I need time to complete the operation. If I'm attacked by a furious mob of buzzers while backing out with my chair......... eek!
    All this is an excuse to show the perennial geranium now in full bloom, for it is this that the %&^$£"*$ bees are dancing about. The wind, so strong until the last couple of days, beat it down, so I put in some supports, but it is not like its usual rounded "bush" of beautiful flowers. Still, there it is.
    Last edited by wherrygirl; June 18th, 2013, 18:03.
    Ivy

    "To thine own self be true.......
    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

    Comment


      Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

      Hi, Ivy. Lovely dragonfly piks. Was wondering what identified it as female - the handbag? Prada stilettos? Taking a breather after chatting to other female dragonflies? ;0)

      Nice story about the bees.

      We have a few magpies visiting our garden. Last week was interrupted by very noisy birds. An adult magpie was teaching its two chicks (almost full grown, but still with some down) to find food for themselves. However, they are still dependant on being fed. Funny to watch them perched on the fence just outside the back door holding their wings back and opening beaks waiting to be fed just as they would have done in the nest. Their cries are different too, Parent raucus, and chicks high pitched.

      Keep up the good work. Funny to see the ways required to get round the swear filter! Remember my having to talk about the Great Tuts in our garden!

      Comment


        Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

        "A leylandii is a tree, Thijs, a tall conifer often used for hedges in the past as it is extremely quick growing. Then people realise their mistake because it gets out of control and becomes huge!
        A gnat is like a small mosquito. Vliegje in Dutch?
        Vixen is the female fox."

        Thanks for explaining, Ivy. Very succinct and better than I would have done!

        Seeing your butterfly pik reminds me of the most strange moth? I have seen in the UK. A few years back I was visiting a local hospital and walking under some trees when something fell down and landed on the pavement. At first I thought it was a double-bladed 'aeroplane' seed until I stopped to look more closely and realised it was a moth (I think). What was unusual about it was its markings, for it resembled those of a WWII Spitfire! Yes, it was in green and khaki camouflage pattern!

        Comment


          Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

          Hallo, Paul, so good to see you dropping in again. I couldn't resist Googling for your moth and found this: http://ukmoths.org.uk/top20.php Look at No. 2, Lime Hawk Moth. Is that the one?
          I was interested to read about your magpies in the garden. Mine is much too small to interest them, I mostly see them when out driving and then I used to start the old rhyme "One for sorrow, two for joy, three for good news, four from a boy". But then as most of the wretched birds I saw were on their own, I rather lost interest in the chant. Years ago my mother and I were holidaying in a caravan down in Penzance, it was a solitary one in someone's garden and had its own little hedge-enclosed lawn, all very peaceful. But every morning we were woken early by the thumping of feet hopping up and down the 'van roof. It was magpies, they had spied the milk bottle left by the door. Then it was a scramble to get out of bed and rush to the door before the birds tucked in. I had thought it was only blue tits that did that!
          Ivy

          "To thine own self be true.......
          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

          Comment


            Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

            Hi, Ivy. Checked out your moth. That one's pattern isn't distinct enough. Look at http://www.animalphotos.me/moth-.htm

            go to 'Night Flying Moths' and find towards bottom one called 'Green Carpet'. That is nearer to it, but don't think it's that one. Better still go to 'Spitfire wing' or 'Hurricane' and there you would have it!

            Strangely enough, I was at the same hospital again today and looked everywhere as i passed under the same tree. Lots of twin bladed aeroplane seeds, but no moth.

            Trees at rear of our garden are a haven for magpies. At times no 'rhyme' could cope with the quantity you can see hopping from branch to branch. They don't like the cats round here either and I've seen them gang up on moggies who have tried stalking one of their gang.

            Watched a strange site recently - an argument between gulls and a magpie on the wing. Something had obviously happened and a couple of gulls were nonchalantly continuing to wheel around while the magpie made a beeline to attack them in the air. The gulls were larger but the magpie was fearless.
            Last edited by Paul Cobb; July 13th, 2013, 01:41.

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              Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

              Re that moth, try google images and look for 'Angle Shades Moth'. Some of those piks seem closer, but I'm still not convinced I've got the right one, yet. Alternatively, google 'Vulcan Bomber' and there you have it! Was a couple of years ago now, though.

              Re magpies, don't think size of yer gardin is responsible for keeping them out, as much as whether there are any decent trees nearby to roost and nest in. Just thrown some bread and fat out. Unlike the wood pigeons that noisily announce their arrival with a rushing beating of their wings, the magpies can be silent. Seen one appear, snatch something off the table and then retire to a tree.

              Have heard some fox mating noises recently so we have visitors again soon. Only seen a random fox recently. In the absence of traditional diet, they even took to nonchalantly eating the birds' bread!

              Keep up the good work.

              Comment


                Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

                Doing our rear garden at the weekend and noticed 2 burrowing efforts under rear panels of neighbour's fence. Had been wondering how foxes were easily getting into our gardens. Rolled a couple of boulders to block their digging. They'll have to dig new ones, now, and I'm sure they will.

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                  Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

                  Good to read your garden wildlife news, Paul. And I've been having an interesting time studying moths, there's some very beautiful ones about, aren't there? I confess, I know next to nothing about them, being able to recognise only the Cinnebar and the Hummingbird Hawk moths. That latter I have seen twice, the first time, several years ago, it was right near the back door and I had to check my insect bible to make sure. Then next day it was in the papers as having been seen in Gt. Yarmouth, so I was quite chuffed. Then I have seen it very briefly more recently. Beautiful little creature.

                  Better still go to 'Spitfire wing' or 'Hurricane' and there you would have it!
                  Alternatively, google 'Vulcan Bomber' and there you have it!
                  You wouldn't be taking me for a ride, would you?????? If so, make it a Tiger Moth.

                  No, I doubt if I'll ever see a magpie in the garden, there are never any around here. BUT, I tell you what, a kite has been seen over Bunga.y, and also a muntjac deer on a bank by the converted maltings only yards from my place. I have just joined a blog about wildlife in Bunga.y, see #125, and someone managed to take a photo of the deer and has posted it on the blog. Goodness knows where it had come from, but what a find!
                  Ivy

                  "To thine own self be true.......
                  Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                  Comment


                    Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

                    2 July, 2013

                    In great contrast to the flower at #331, this evening primrose is delicacy itself, caught in the morning softness before the sun had moved round to kill the colour with its full-on glare.

                    Ivy

                    "To thine own self be true.......
                    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                    Comment


                      Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

                      That's beautiful - and like you say, such soft colours in that light.

                      Sitting on the patio looking at our own brown grass now - temperatures dropping back to high 20s, more comfortable than the 30C+ in the daytime. The garden is just about becoming productive with peas, tomatoes, cucumber and courgettes all just about ready, onion and potato picked, and the beans in flower. Whether the runners will set beans or not with this little water will be the question.

                      The other question is who will jump first when we water - me or Freddy the Frog. He doesn't seem to like water - not sure he's read the book!
                      Cheers,

                      Mark.

                      www.pologlover.co.uk

                      Comment


                        Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

                        a nice flower Ivy,i don't have much yellow flowers.
                        best regards Thijs

                        Comment


                          Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

                          Originally posted by wherrygirl View Post
                          I've been having an interesting time studying moths, there's some very beautiful ones about, aren't there? I confess, I know next to nothing about them, being able to recognise only the Cinnebar and the Hummingbird Hawk moths.


                          You wouldn't be taking me for a ride, would you?????? If so, make it a Tiger Moth.
                          Yes, in searching for 'my' moth, I've noticed some amazingly beautifully coloured ones. Strange thing is whereas butterflies are considered beautiful, moths aren't. It must be their association with creatures of the night or because of their passion for eating clothes. Yet not all moths are night-time ones and not all eat clothes.

                          I did consider jokingly referring to looking up the pattern of a Tiger Moth's wing! From memory, the pattern on the Vulcan Bomber was exactly what I remember seeing on the moth.

                          Yesterday saw a sparrow pounce in the garden and it disturbed a small moth. As the moth tried to escape, the sparrow then caught it on the wing. Fast reactions!

                          Comment


                            Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

                            15 July 2013

                            In contrast to the last flower, here is the rich gold of the rose Korresia, described as the best of the yellows. It is indeed an entrancing bloom.

                            Last edited by wherrygirl; July 20th, 2013, 22:51. Reason: Spelling mistake in the name
                            Ivy

                            "To thine own self be true.......
                            Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                            Comment


                              Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

                              16 July 2013

                              My beautiful lily:

                              Ivy

                              "To thine own self be true.......
                              Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                              Comment


                                Re: Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

                                19 July 2013

                                That Korresia rose now fully open:


                                It is beautiful at whatever stage it is.

                                This dear little miniature rose has blossomed this year as never before:

                                And something else that has done really well is the lavender. I have never known it attract such a mass of not only bees - bumble and honey - but also the small tortoiseshell butterfly. The garden has been full of the latter and whereas I used to see just one or two a day in previous summers now they were many flying around me whenever I went into the garden. Sitting near the lavender with my cuppa the whole bush was fluttering with them all.

                                Last edited by wherrygirl; July 21st, 2013, 18:23.
                                Ivy

                                "To thine own self be true.......
                                Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                                Comment

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