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Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

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    Wherrygirl's Garden Patch

    23 August 2010
    Actually it is three patches plus house on a kind of back to front L-shaped plot. In the angle of the L is the house, behind that is, not surprisingly, the back garden about 19 ft. across by 38 ft. long, at the side to the left is the veggie patch of about the same size while stretching along the front of house and veggies is the strip of the third garden, separated from the latter by a tall fence. (Well, a girl has to have some privacy when she’s digging up the spuds. That's if she can find them -– this year was a complete dead loss of all 8 plants.) Assuming you are now suitably confused, don't start demanding scale plans because there's nuthin' doin'. My patches keep me busy, in fact usually it's a scramble to keep up with it all. Maybe that's because as well as slaving away - ahem, perhaps that should read instead of slaving away – I'm often standing staring ….. the first of something just coming into bloom, a butterfly sunbathing on the low side wall, a devil's coach-horse emerging from under a stone I've disturbed and wa-hey, look, a cricket.
    This is what I want to share, meandering through the seasons having a “gawp” at what's going on.
    A Green Woman. My garden spirit?




    While the image of the Green Man is well known, the female of the species is not often met with. I don’t know who was responsible for the original mould from which this pottery image is made, but she is just superb. On my thread Small Buildings, Small Details I posted a door-knocker (oh, be quiet Jan Olav! ) of a similar image which I’d been surprised to see in my own street.
    Does anyone know why the Green Man is so often found in Christian churches, particularly mediæval ones? A pagan symbol, it can perhaps be converted to represent the unity of mankind with the natural world, which I feel very keenly, but why retain it in a church?
    Last edited by wherrygirl; December 14th, 2013, 17:03.
    Ivy

    "To thine own self be true.......
    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

    #2
    23 August 2010
    The first 3 pictures below are of a regular poacher, oh, and I may as well add a one-off visitor also after the peanuts. These photos I have posted elsewhere and at the time they sowed the seed (note appropriate metaphor ) of this Garden Patch thread.
    Mouse, cute little creature, photographed from the open kitchen window where I often stand gawping while washing up my breakfast things - till I suddenly realise the tap's still running.
    Mouse has quickly got wise to the fact that messy birds kicking the food about on the bird-table above equals tasty morsels strewn over the ground, trouble-free take-aways for him. I'm not sure whether he lives next door, there is a hole under the fence, or whether he's the chap who eats my bulbs waiting in the shed for me to plant.
    Bird-food bandit








    Not too sharp a photo below as the peanut holder was swinging under the weight. I was excited seeing him, only the second time in my small town garden. I forgave him the theft.
    Another bird-food bandit




    Not too sharp a photo below - no excuse.
    Quick get-away foiled. Dare he rush them?
    Last edited by wherrygirl; December 14th, 2013, 16:59.
    Ivy

    "To thine own self be true.......
    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

    Comment


      #3
      Oh, Ivy these are CHARMING! I quite thinking Beatrix Potter!!!! How Clever! More, please!!! MORE!!!!!

      Comment


        #4
        nice images Ivy,wishis that we had squirls here.
        seen it on tv how smart they are to get to the food
        best regards Thijs

        Comment


          #5
          23 August 2010
          Many thanks for your comments.
          The agapanthus clump did not do so well this year. Last year I counted 27 beautiful blue balls, but this year it managed only 7. Another gripe: the individual florets, instead of gradually opening until all were out and then lasting in full bloom for a week or so, began to fade and droop while others were still developing. But I found a bonus one morning.

          Hoverfly

          A piece on the radio the other day said that there was an abundance of hoverflies about in England recently, apparently blown over from France. I can imagine a hefty bluebottle battling its way across the Channel, but the thought of these fragile rainbow-winged creatures managing to survive the crossing amazes me. They are just beautiful. I have plenty of hoverflies in the garden each year, presumably home grown. They are always after nectar, like this one, but apparently they eat greenfly as well. Good for them, and more power to their jaws, or whatever they chump with.
          Last edited by wherrygirl; September 7th, 2010, 19:29. Reason: Added date
          Ivy

          "To thine own self be true.......
          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

          Comment


            #6
            23 August 2010
            Underneath all that pollen is a bee, one of those with the orange backside.

            I belong to the Woodland Trust in England, which is affiliated to the Phenology Network, and I record "happenings" in the natural world throughout the seasons, first blossoms, first tadpoles, last swallow, etc. Must admit that I've not been so good with it this year. But somewhere amongst the welter of information in the email newsletters I'm sure I read something about this orange-bottomed bee, while not in danger of extinction, becoming scarcer. But there's always quite a few in my patch.
            Last edited by wherrygirl; September 7th, 2010, 19:31. Reason: Added date
            Ivy

            "To thine own self be true.......
            Thou canst not then be false to any man."

            Comment


              #7
              Last weekend I was looking closely at some blooms in our garden and there was a hover fly sucking away. A couple of weeks ago we looked in at Cleethorpes and I think it was the hover fly that was in abundance everywhere. I went for a wade out into the estuary and there were thousands of these insects just floating drowned on the sea surface (actually hundreds around, but they went as far as the eye could see so guessed it would run into thousands.)

              I've been trying to research The Green Man recently and have gathered many photos from t'interweb. Haven't seen him represented as a woman, though!

              We have a pesky squirrel that comes into our garden after the bird seed feeder - just prevents me putting more seed out.

              At the weekend I could see a side bed that had been disturbed with dead leaves thrown everywhere. As I looked the leaves moved and the culprit emerged onto the lawn - Harry the Hedgehog. Haven't been out since so don't know if he is nesting there or was just foraging.

              Comment


                #8
                What a wonderful thread Wherrygirl. Even though many of us take photos of these sort of subjects from time to time, the fact that these are not just any birds or bees or flowers or squirrels but Wherrygirl's Garden Patch ones makes it so much more meaningful. It’s a bit like doing a 365, at least the local ones, but without the enforced regularity, just taking things in the same place as and when they happen. We are going to be able to understand nature’s changes through observing the Garden Patch as the seasons unfold and the year passes.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Paul Cobb View Post
                  Last weekend I was looking closely at some blooms in our garden and there was a hover fly sucking away. A couple of weeks ago we looked in at Cleethorpes and I think it was the hover fly that was in abundance everywhere. I went for a wade out into the estuary and there were thousands of these insects just floating drowned on the sea surface (actually hundreds around, but they went as far as the eye could see so guessed it would run into thousands.)
                  Now that's really interesting, Paul. Where you were meant that they would have had quite a long flight and must have been too exhausted to forage. Thank you.

                  Originally posted by Seagull View Post
                  It’s a bit like doing a 365, at least the local ones, but without the enforced regularity, just taking things in the same place as and when they happen. We are going to be able to understand nature’s changes through observing the Garden Patch as the seasons unfold and the year passes.
                  That's just what attracted me when I was thinking about it, Seagull. Remaining static and letting things come to me - i.e. the lazy way
                  Ivy

                  "To thine own self be true.......
                  Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                  Comment


                    #10
                    24 August 2010
                    I knew I had another hoverfly somewhere, but I was really wanting the common or garden marigold blossom when I was choosing. The insect was just a welcome addition to the perfection of the bloom. This was taken during the day, but I do love marigolds at dusk, they become almost as if illuminated from within.

                    Last edited by wherrygirl; September 7th, 2010, 19:32. Reason: Added date
                    Ivy

                    "To thine own self be true.......
                    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                    Comment


                      #11
                      These are really stunning images Ivy. Very well done.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Bill, thank you very much.
                        Ivy

                        "To thine own self be true.......
                        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                        Comment


                          #13
                          25 August 2010
                          My dictionary states that lichen can be pronounced two ways, either as in "liken" or else with a short "i" as in "bit" and "ch" as in "church". I have always used the second way because it sounds rough and interesting, the aural equivalent of the crinkly corrugations of this dual natured growth. Strange stuff.


                          The green tufts are rather dried up lumps of moss.


                          The silvery grey variety also exists in my patch (there are some small pieces in this photo, particularly bottom left) and it's strange, for small discs about half to one inch across began to appear all over the paving suddenly last year, and have survived all my tramping up and down and around. I've been here 40-odd years and yet they all arrived in a short space of time. As I said, strange stuff. It is said to exist only in a clean atmosphere, which means that the air above my garden must be as pure as that of the Norwegian mountains.
                          Last edited by wherrygirl; September 7th, 2010, 19:34. Reason: Added date
                          Ivy

                          "To thine own self be true.......
                          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Are you sure you haven't been walking up and down your path eating apple pie and have spilled splodges of custard at regular intervals, Ivy?

                            Think when little I tended to read it as 'licken' (a la Finger Licken Good). Then I heard it pronounced on the tele as 'lie-ken'.

                            If those slabs are like ours, they are back breakers to lift!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              25 August 2010
                              Lesser Tortoiseshell butterfly

                              I saw this back in early July, it was probably a June hatching as it looks so spick and span. Some of them hibernate over winter and there is often one doing just that in my bedroom as I never have heating in there. One was high up in the corner by the ceiling last winter and then some time early this year I noticed that it had shifted position slightly. Oh dear, I thought, for it was a warm spell some time at the end of winter, can't quite remember when but much too early for butterflies to be abroad. Sure enough, one morning it had flown. The inevitable happened, winter returned with all its force and I doubt if the tortoiseshell would have survived. I find it second only to the ubiquitous "cabbage white" in numbers, but this year sightings were well down.

                              Female Gatekeeper butterfly



                              This one is a restless feeder, so despite many attempts its image is not as sharp as I'd like, in fact I was delighted to get the one with wings open as that very rarely happens. It usually appears in my garden about July when the marjoram in the herb patch blossoms and most years the plant is alive with Gatekeepers. This year the marjoram didn't fare so well, I don't know why because it is a tough plant, so fewer flowers equalled fewer Gatekeepers. This one is on the mint blossom, anyway!
                              Last edited by wherrygirl; September 7th, 2010, 19:35. Reason: Added date
                              Ivy

                              "To thine own self be true.......
                              Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                              Comment

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