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    #91
    February 12, 2014

    Polarlys, docked in Molde, February 2006:

    Regards; Sigve.
    ---
    IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

    Comment


      #92
      February 13, 2014:

      Le Diamant

      Last summer we didn’t see this nice and very special little cruise ship in nordic waters. In 2011, she.was sold to Quark Expeditions and renamed Ocean Diamond.. She was previously named Song of Flower, Explorer Starship and Le Diamant.

      «Ocean Diamond features the Expert in Residence program, which will let scientists, polar researchers, historians and other experts to undertake field work from the ship. Passengers are allowed to assist the experts in their work.» (Wikipedia)


      (Flåm, May 2009)
      On the companys website we read:
      «The Ocean Diamond is Quark’s modern, stable super yacht, and the largest of our small ships. Carrying a maximum of 189 passengers, this outstanding vessel features numerous adventure options….It is also very fuel efficient and is the only ship in Antarctica to offer certified CarbonNeutral® voyages.»


      (Canon Digital Photo, Flåm, July 2006)

      When reading this one should remember that she is the rebuilt freighter Begonia from 1974, 40 years old. But she is a nice ship and was a welcome guest, she had character and was untypical from the big boxes that now resides in our fjords.
      It seems that she has been busy in the Antarctic most of this winter and I can’t find her in Norway the coming summer.
      Last edited by Sigve; February 12th, 2014, 23:22.
      Regards; Sigve.
      ---
      IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

      Comment


      • yvneac
        yvneac commented
        Editing a comment
        From 2004 to 2012 Le Diamant was owned by the French company Le Ponant.She sailed in Mediterranée , Baltic sea, Norway,Antartic and South America.She was sold when L'Austral and Le Boreal were launched.Last summer aboard Le Soleal I met people who made a cruise with her and keep good memories of her.But it seems that at the end she was no longer at the confort standards for the company.

      #93
      February 14, 2014

      From the Lofoten thread we have heard that GraemeD has missed a round trip with Lofoten because of Lofoten's cancellation, and maybe the next tour is cancelled as well. Let us hope the best; the next tour is the Lofoten 50th anniversary tour, departing Bergen 2 March. In this occasion I post a picture of Lofoten on Valderøyfjorden at Ålesund, taken in October 1992, in a brief period when Lofoten was owned by Finnmarks Fylkesrederi and with FFR's letters on the superstructure. In the background we can see Valderøy and Vigra, and the tall radio mast of Radio Ålesund, a landmark which was later taken down.


      (October 1992, Nikon, Fuji Velvia film)
      Regards; Sigve.
      ---
      IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

      Comment


        #94
        I enjoyed very much your pictures of the coaches and can confirm your comments about Setra and Neoplan as passenger.

        Setra was always a keyword for quality and is until today. Since 1995 it is owned 100% by Mercedes Benz.
        http://www.setra-bus.com/no-no/setrastartseite.html (they have no engish version of their website, but a special site for USA)
        http://www.pistenbully.com/en/company.html (is one of the two Kässbohrer companies)
        http://www.kaessbohrer.com/ (is the second company)

        Neoplan was well known for it's outstanding design and it was always a pleasure for me when a Neoplan showed up to take us on a tour.
        In 2001 the owner Auwärter closed the company and Neoplan became a part of MAN. The Stuttgart plant was closed and sold in 2005.
        In my opinion they are today not as outstanding as in former days, the qualitiy is not so high anymore.
        They are building less than half as much buses today than in 2001.
        http://www.neoplan-bus.com/cms/en/home.html (coaches)
        http://viseon-yourbus.com/ (city and airfield buses)
        Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

        Comment


        • Sigve
          Sigve commented
          Editing a comment
          Thank You, Ralf, for your comments and links. Yes, the modern Setra Top Clas S 515-517 HDH's are awesome coaches. I'm not so sure about how I like the new Neoplans...
          (Stay tuned, there will be more about coaches.)

        #95
        February 15, 2014:

        More about Black Prince.

        In post # 68 I came to say that Black Prince (1966) is still afloat as Ola Esmeralda in Latin America. However, info on the internet tells me that she was sold to the scrappers in 2012 and most likely is scrapped by now. What a pity.

        From Maritime Matters:
        http://maritimematters.com/2012/11/a...ses-operation/


        From Wikipedia:
        «The Black Prince has been retired from the Fred. Olsen fleet on 16 October 2009. Although her withdrawal is reportedly due to the new SOLAS 2010 regulations, she has been sold to SAVECA for further cruise service in Venezuelan waters. SAVECA plans to use the ship for cruises between islands within Venezuelan waters then as a floating hotel there. Its last stop was in port of Santo Domingo. There was a rumor that a company was going to restore it so it could come back to service; nevertheless, it was scrapped.»


        (Black Prince in Flåm, July 2007, Canon Digital Photo)

        In the same post I commented that Black Prince/Black Watch was the end of a design evolution that started after the WWII. In this picture we can see BP on her first call in Oslo in 1966, together with Braemar (or Blenheim) from 1951-52. The evolution can be clearly seen. Note the funnel similarities.


        (Picture found on the internet).

        In a later post, I will show some pictures from one of BP’s last calls in Flåm.

        Simplon Postcards has a fine collection of these ships, which I recommend.
        Last edited by Sigve; February 14th, 2014, 18:11. Reason: Fine tuning
        Regards; Sigve.
        ---
        IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

        Comment


          #96
          February 15, 2014:

          Since it's weekend, and since I'm usually in a very good mood at weekends, I'll post an X-tra.
          This one is for Janihudi and all our truck interested friends.

          Asphalt cowboys

          Here we are crossing Mjøsa at Minnesund on E6, in June 1983. I was hiking with Harald S (to make a story for a trucking magazine). He was a veteran truck driver, he had been driving between Åndalsnes and Oslo for ages. He had a very nice Volvo F12 with a Globetrotter cab. He told about the old days (50 and 60'ies) when the cowboys ruled the roads. They often raced over Dovre in the night, side by side and without lights, and some even had a keg of brandy under the seat in case they might get tired.



          We slept in the truck that night, and in the morning we took a picture of his truck in Romsdalen, with the Trollveggen as a background.


          (June 1983, Nikon, Fuji Provia film)

          Note that his trailer, like almost 99% of norwegian trailers at that time, was the typical norwegian combination of truck and trailer. This is considered better in the winter because of its better accessibility (greater weight on the drive wheels) and is easier to handle on narrow and winding roads. Today a great part of norwegian trailers are the typical EU combination, tractor and trailer, but the tractors most often has 3 axles, which gives an advantage in winter. Most foreign trailers getting into trouble on norwegian winter roads, are EU combinations with 2-axled tractor and trailer, and the trailers most often are wrongly loaded. (Please forgive me if my terminology is incorrect, this is a long time ago….)

          Have a good weekend!
          Regards; Sigve.
          ---
          IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

          Comment


            #97
            February 16, 2014:

            Hungarian Gulasj; tasty and popular dish in Hallingdal Feriepark (Hallingdal Holyday Park) 5 star holiday park in Ål, Hallingdal, Buskerud, Norway.
            Bon apetite!


            (Canon EOS 6D digital photo).
            Regards; Sigve.
            ---
            IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

            Comment


            • Seagull
              Seagull commented
              Editing a comment
              That looks just SO cosy and inviting …and delicious, Sigve.

            #98
            not only in Norway this is/was the most seen combination ,in the Netherlands and as in Germany it was the most seen combinatian.
            even now you see them a lot,but in another axle configuration.in Germany i think it is still the most used,but in Holland it went more to the configuration as the middle axle trailers.
            the names we got for this type's is combinatian or for short ,combi
            the general name is ''combi'' ,which stands for ''motorwagen met aanhanger'', engine truck with trailer.
            those stil come as on your image,but the trailers more and more as middle axle trailer,the 1,2 or 3axle in the middle.
            main reason for that is the truck and trailer can be connected closer to eachother,which means more loadingmeters.
            advantage for this is combinations, disconnecting the trailer at one adres for load or onload the trailer and go to another place for the same thing with the truck.

            a 2 mid axle trailer ,which als could be a ''widespread''



            a 3 mid axle trailer.



            i had surch for schedule of chassis types,but didn't found that,so those images

            if those kind of combinatios are better,i dont know,i had driven them,but i was the spare driver for it.
            for the driver it's better,it's calmer ,smoother driving in a truck than a tractor because of the long wheelbase.
            but it's better in winter? i don't know.
            if you look at the image the axle's are on the middle of the loading box,so the freight is also pressing on the frontaxle,i presume that the last axle is a ''lift''axle otherwise he would be nowhere in the snow,to less pressure on the wheel.by partwise un/loading he want to have his load above the axle,what means empty in the front.
            he also has 2 pivotpoints on his combination,the connection truck-trailer and the steeringaxle of his trailer.
            in snow at breaking it can go many ways.


            the now most used EU combinations are the 2 axle truck with a 1,2,3 or more axles,more axles ,more loading capticity.
            the by me driven 3 axle truck is a kind of compromis.
            a tandemaxle truck with 1 steering axle and 2 traction axles can have alot of weight,but the fixed axles have a lot of tyre wear.
            by removing 1 rim each side and make it a steering axle,you have both,more freight (compare a 2 axle truck) but less tyre wear (compare a fixed tandem axle truck),
            these are also availeble as a tag axle ,when empty lift that axle (which i also can do on my truck,but then the steering axle)

            the advance of a 3 axle truck i don't see for driving,it's only ''more axles,more tons of loading''.
            if you can't lift that third axle in the snow your stuck in it.if you can lift that one,is more pressure on the snow for driving.
            but then again whit the use of snowchains will probally work better on a 3 axle truck,but the weight is ditrubute over 8 tyres instead 4 tyres on a 2 axle truck.

            the problem with the wrongly load trailers.is not as much wrongly loaded,but more as partly unloaded when you have more adresses to unload.
            you start with a full trailer in a snowfree Bergen and go up north with several unloading places but more snow,so no weight on the back ,but al the weight in the front.
            thats good,thats wheel pressure (unfortunally the cops don't like that,overload) .,down side is totally no wheel pressure at the back of the trailer,by breaking,it's break out to a side.
            if you look at your image,the axles are al over the truck,but with the tractor-trailer combination you have the wheels under the tractor,and at the end of the trailer,more weight is pussing on the tractor because of the long wheelbase.
            also you can place your trailer everywhere and pick up any trailer you need for your next cargo,while the combination you have Always the same load boxes,flats,reefer boxes,sheet boxes or a container truck,but you can only drive 1 or 2 20ft containers.

            so al in al,both got there advance i think,but never been in Scandinavia,so also no expierience in snow driving with chains,without i have from Germany




            best regards Thijs

            Comment


            • Sigve
              Sigve commented
              Editing a comment
              Overload is to exceed the permitted axle load, let's say 10 tonnes. Then you have a problem. That's like breaking the speed limit. However, this can be avoided with a three-axle tractor, where you can load 10 tons more than just a dual-axis, and thereby distribute the load better in the trailer. In an emergency on winter conditions, you can raise the third axle, and thus get more pressure on the drive shaft. And then perhaps get out of the jam.
              Last edited by Sigve; February 19th, 2014, 08:29.

            • wherrygirl
              wherrygirl commented
              Editing a comment
              Yes, I understand that, Sigve, but it seems from the points put forward that the police - following the law on axle loads - have regard only to that on the drive axle, regardless of the effect elsewhere. Whereas it seems to a (definitely!) non-truckdriver that the law should surely have regard to the distribution of loads elsewhere in whatever combination of tractor/truck/trailer it is before setting a drive axle limit. That is: "if this, then that", with varying permutations of "this".
              But that would no doubt be too complicated and lead to endless disputes!

            • janihudi
              janihudi commented
              Editing a comment
              that we mostly talked about the drive axle,is of,there is just one (sometimes 2),while on a trailer there are more axles (mostly 3),if less axles 1 or 2,then these are mostly used bu companies which have own loads (production companies with own trucks,like chips or toiletpaper producers,there never heavy so 1 or 2 axles wil do,while transporting companies use 3 axle trailer ,because then they can take every load thats availeble,and with liftaxles they also have 1,2 or a 3 axles trailer.
              as i have told in the highway cruiser thread ,i can drive on 3 acles,unloaded,and i can take every axle as i need comparing the load.
              if you see the weights on my axles
              frontaxle 8,000kg
              second axle 7,500kg
              drive axle 11,500kg
              total of the truck 27,000kg what it may weights

              trailer/chassis
              axle 1 9,000kg
              axle 2 9,000kg
              axle 3 9,000kg
              axle 4 9,000kg
              total 36,000kg
              in combination with the truck i got a max weight capticty 53,000kg or 53 tons

            #99
            February 17, 2014:

            Harald Jarl, Ålesund, October 1992:





            Regards; Sigve.
            ---
            IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

            Comment


            • Seagull
              Seagull commented
              Editing a comment
              Ahhhhh! Something else to delightedly drool over as I catch up here in your gallery this morning!

            February 18, 2014:

            Kong Olav in VDS colours. Old postcard.

            Regards; Sigve.
            ---
            IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

            Comment


              February 19, 2014;


              Looking forward to the summer. The Caledonian Sky ( ex Hebridean Spirit, ex Rennaissance Six) on Aurlandsfjorden, departing Flåm.


              (June 2012, Canon EOS 5D Mk III digital photo)
              Regards; Sigve.
              ---
              IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

              Comment


                February 20, 2014:

                The Faroe Islands I

                I promised yvneac that there would be some pictures from the Faroes in this thread, and here are three as a starter:

                The ferry Teistur leaves Gamlarætt. Seen is the island Koltur.



                From the tiny village of Elduvik, with the charachteristic profile of Kalsoy behind.



                We stayed on the ground floor of Hotel Færøyar. During a little party in our room, a local partycrasher turned up...


                (July 2008, Canon digital photo).
                Regards; Sigve.
                ---
                IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                Comment


                • yvneac
                  yvneac commented
                  Editing a comment
                  WOW.Thank you Sigve for these pictures.
                  The sheep seems very friendly,it's not always the case.I remember one of his brother on Svinoy which had not a good sense of humour!
                  Yves(yvneac)

                February 21, 2014;

                More Hebridean; Hebridean Princess this time.

                This one is for Seagull and our british friends…:

                For some time, I felt a fancy for the Hebridean Princess (built 1964), based on what I knew about her from the net. A converted car ferry, OK. Small, yes. And luxurious, sure. But then I saw her in Flåm. And thats why I ask our british friends; Is she able to cross the North Sea in rough weather? What is known about her seaworthiness?

                And something else that puzzles me: Why are the windows in the wheelhouse the smallest in the whole superstructure? Is it because they sail on instruments only and don’t need to look out? (Joke) Very odd…..

                (PS: I should like to go around Scotland and the islands with her, but alas, I don’t have a tuxedo…)

                Seen in Flåm July 2005, with Astoria (ex Astor (1981), ex SagaPearl II, now Quest for adventure). She will be back this summer. She is now 50 years old.



                From the company website:
                "The highlands and islands of Scotland, her lochs and remote mainland areas are all accessible from the luxurious comfort of Hebridean Princess.
                Carrying just 50 guests, Hebridean Princess has an enviable reputation for exceptional service, fine food and wine and the very warm welcome extended by our dedicated crew of 38. She has thirty spacious, elegant and well-appointed cabins, 10 designed especially for the single traveller.
                Over the course of more than twenty five seasons, we have taken pleasure in sharing our local knowledge with passengers, and in introducing them to some of the most striking locations in Europe. Romantic castles; tranquil, spectacular lochs; wide open spaces and seldom-visited anchorages. A selection of "Footloose" cruises caters for most walking abilities with a range of guided walks in the hills and mountains, seashores and lochs, with the promise of a nip of whisky and a fine and hearty meal back on board.
                Our cruises of between 4 and 10 nights depart mainly from Oban, sailing the waters of the western isles and beyond to far-flung St Kilda, the Orkney and Shetland Isles."


                (July 2005, Nikon Digital Photo)

                MV Hebridean Princess is a cruise ship operated by Hebridean Island Cruises. She started life as the MacBrayne car ferry and Royal Mail Ship, initially RMS then MV Columba, based in Oban for the first 25 years of her life, carrying up to 600 passengers, and 50 cars, between the Scottish islands. (Wikipedia)

                Youtube:
                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeCM46SKIfI
                Last edited by Sigve; February 20th, 2014, 21:36.
                Regards; Sigve.
                ---
                IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                Comment


                • ombugge
                  ombugge commented
                  Editing a comment
                  They probably have steel shutters for the large front window, but harden windows for the Bridge.
                  I wonder how this vessel manage to meet SOLAS requirements though. If trading UK Coast only that is one thing, but cruising to Norway it becomes an International voyage and different rules applies. (SOLAS 2010)

                More about the ship's history here:

                http://shipsofcalmac.co.uk/h_columba.asp

                You can see here, that the original window size was smaller and that looked much better. But you might think different when sitting inside.
                The 2014 cruise plan includes cruises to the Orkney and Faroes. You may also join the crossing of the North Sea from Invergordon to Bergen.

                http://www.hebridean.co.uk/uploads/f...re%20PDF_1.pdf

                So she must have been conversed to SOLAS 2010 compliance.
                This is a different strategy compared to 2009, when they sold the Hebridean Spirit (ex Renaissance VI) because of the SOLAS regulations.
                If a ship is designed to serve the Hebridean Islands i would assume that she is able to cross the North Sea. The other question is, how comfortable that might be in heavy seas.
                Last edited by Ralf__; February 21st, 2014, 12:20.
                Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

                Comment


                • Sigve
                  Sigve commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Yes, I have read that she is a favourite of the Queen. Most of August she will be in norwegian fjords, mainly Hardangerfjord and Sognefjord, three different cruises, calling in Eidfjord August 8 and Flåm August 22.

                • ombugge
                  ombugge commented
                  Editing a comment
                  The question is not whether she can cross the North Sea on a good day, but whether the rules and regulations allow her to. Coastal trade and International trade is two different thing when it comes to rules. SOLAS 2010 applies to ships in international trade and over 500 GT, not to ships in coastal trade only.
                  Single voyage dispensation maybe??
                  Last edited by ombugge; February 22nd, 2014, 10:08.

                • Sigve
                  Sigve commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Maybe I shouldn't question her seaworthiness? I read this about her sister, the Hebrides (the one that crossed the Atlantic):
                  "HEBRIDES attained an astonishing reputation for reliability and in 1977 Iain McCrorie could record that she “has often ventured out of port to cross the Minch in the teeth of a gale while her consorts were safely tied up in harbour..."

                February 22, 2014

                Highland adventures III (Scotland, January 1983)

                All this writing about the Hebridean Princess reminds me that I'm not finished with my scottish adventures. After a stopover in Edinburgh, I moved on to Inverness.

                This was my first view of Inverness on a rainy morning, seen from my window at the Caledonian Hotel. The weather was grey and so was the city.
                (I can still remember the atmosphere of that sunday morning; actually there were no sounds, except a faint, soft sound of running water from the river. And some raindrops. There was a city, but no sounds. To this day, I remember the silence of the city....)



                My guide, Bob K from the BTA took me for a guided tour in the area. We drove the Old Military Road on the south/east side of Loch Ness and then back on the north side. I remember he had a Saab, that was unusual.



                «George I appointed General Wade as Commander-in-chief, North Britain, 1724. The first of four roads whose building Wade would oversee, was under construction by the following year; i) from Inverness to Fort William (along the south side of Loch Ness)» The government of George I sent Wade to inspect Scotland in 1724. He recommended the construction of barracks, bridges and proper roads to assist in the control of the region and on 10 May 1725 received appointment as Commander in Chief of His Majesty's forces, castles, forts and barracks in North Britain, tasked with carrying out his own recommendations. Over the next twelve years Wade directed the construction of some 240 miles (390 km) of roads, plus 30 bridges (including the Tay Bridge at Aberfeldy). General Wade's military roads linked the garrisons at Ruthven, Fort George, Fort Augustus, and Fort William." (Wikipedia)



                This is the Boleskine Burial Ground, near The Coach House, just northeast of Foyers, The Boleskine burial ground is undoubtedly one of the better known land marks around South Loch Ness. It is situated on the B852 between Inverfarigaig and Foyers between the road and the loch.



                The Old Wade Bridge/White Bridge from 1732 at Whitebridge. The village's name comes from the bridge over the River Fechlin, constructed in 1732. This was built by General Wade as part of a military road in an attempt to suppress further Jacobite risings. A garrison used to be stationed in Whitebridge.



                I wonder if he was a journalist by profession ( I don'’t remember). He took me to his office, and this looks very much like an editorial office of that time…. (I know, I had one myself...)

                Last edited by Sigve; February 21st, 2014, 19:35.
                Regards; Sigve.
                ---
                IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                Comment

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