Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sigve's Gallery

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts


  • Thank you Sigve. Simply wonderful, and how I wish my 'hurtigruting' had begun a few years earlier so I too might have met that cat. I've always especially liked the arrival and stop at Torvik on the northbound trip without quite being able to explain why. If, or is it when, that call is lost from the schedule, I'll feel hurtigruten will have lost more of its soul, and no amount of scenic fjord or touristic diversions will make me feel any better.

    Comment


    • Sigve, your train pictures made me watch breathless. Very impressing! What an experience for the engine driver to trust that there will be nowhere that bit too much snow on the track!
      Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

      Comment


      • Don't know if there is an English version.

        Comment


        • I have four cat books, Yves, but have not seen that one!
          Ivy

          "To thine own self be true.......
          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

          Comment


          • Sigve
            Sigve commented
            Editing a comment
            Thank you all for your nice comments!

        • January 12, 2015:

          Much weather in Norway these days. One storm after another. This is an EL 14, coming down from a rough ride crossing Hardangervidda.



          EL 14 is a swiss construction, license built in Norway 1968 – 1973. 31 locomotives were built, 22 in use today as a cargo locomotive for CargoNet.
          Regards; Sigve.
          ---
          IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

          Comment


          • January 13, 2015:

            Speaking of EL 14 and rough train rides in my former post, this is a picture from March 1975. The locomotive driver tries to clean up his EL 14 front window at Haugastøl, after a ride over Hardangervidda. The forward view is totally blocked by compact snow behind the front window bars. The snow was thick like concrete. The bars were meant to protect against ice and snow lumps, which at that time could hide in the tunnel openings, and in the many superstructures that are built to protect against drifting snow.



            But the driver didn’t need to look ahead. With his forward view blocked, he just looked out of the side window. And he knew every turn and bend on the line, so he knew exactly where he was.



            I remember that the trains often came down from Hardangervidda with their fronts totally blocked. Such bars are not used today.

            This is how the line looked from the engine. The snowdrifts were thick. But the EL 14 made its way with no fuzz.



            And this is how Hardangevridda looks on a sunny winter day.

            Regards; Sigve.
            ---
            IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

            Comment


            • wherrygirl
              wherrygirl commented
              Editing a comment
              A train is a train is a train! But passenger trains, no, Nari. Apart from the Port Hedland iron ore ones I only know the little tuppney-hapney ones from Perth to the suburbs and Freo.

            • PoloUK
              PoloUK commented
              Editing a comment
              I feel some railway-engineer baiting going on here! I would point out that Australia has over 41,000km of railway, 3,000km of which is electrified. Norway has 4,077km in total. It's just that there's so much of Australia you can go an awfully long way without seeing a train, particularly a passenger train. The Company I work for has however been supplying railway signalling to Oz contnually since the 19th Century. You certainly don't see too many Australian trains in the snow though - although there are trains in the Blue Mountains, and I believe you do get some dodgy weather there sometimes. There are also trains through the Snowy Mountains too.

            • nari
              nari commented
              Editing a comment
              Mark,
              We do have trains between the capitals, but they are old and slow and have to change carriages and engines because of the varying gauges between states. Something that should never have happened, but there it is.
              No trains to the Snowy's - never have been. One has to drive or catch a bus to get to the mountains. Once there, there is a small train for skiers between stations, over short distances. The train to Sydney from the nation's capital take 4.5 hours (or longer)on a dodgy track, but it's only 3 hours by bus or car.
              So if one lives on the East coast, in one of about six towns, train travel up and down the coast is good. Why? Because 80% of the country's population lives on the coast.

          • In stead there are Road Trains: http://theschoolmarm.com/choo-choo-on-the-highway/

            Here is a normal size one:


            And a Super Train:


            Don't try this in Norway.

            Comment


            • Tommi
              Tommi commented
              Editing a comment
              Road trains are very common in Australia. I remember reading about them when I grow up in the Swedish magazine "Trailer" and was quite amazed.

          • Very impressing winter pictures from the Hardangervidda trains.
            I can't imagine that similar circumstances would be possible in our regulated society of today.
            Dozends of insurance companies would intervene..

            Ombugge, you*re a candidate for the yearly off-topic award.
            Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

            Comment


            • Road trains are very common in Australia. I remember reading about them when I grow up in the Swedish magazine "Trailer" and was quite amazed.




              Yes, Tommi. I saw quite a few of them in the Pilbara, but found it difficult to get a decent photograph. As soon as we saw one approaching we would get off the road immediately so as to allow the vehicle to pass, but as we were usually on a road which was dead straight as far as could be seen (most of them are in the Pilbara), a distant view gave little impression of its length. As to a close up shot as it thundered past - all I seemed to get was a charming pic. of an axle! In my thread about the WA outback I mentioned lying in my tent off the Marble Bar-Port Hedland road and seeing the lights of an approaching vehicle through the canvas then feeling the ground vibrate as the roaring giant swept past. They were certainly something to see! I think I'll post my poem in the appropriate thread. Apologies to Sigve for going so OT!
              Ivy

              "To thine own self be true.......
              Thou canst not then be false to any man."

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Ralf__ View Post
                Ombugge, you*re a candidate for the yearly off-topic award.
                What is the topic of Sigve's Gallery anyhow, if not trains (lately)???
                I didn't bring up Australian trains first. I plead the 5th amendment.

                Comment


                • yvneac
                  yvneac commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Supposing I was a member in the Grand Jury, I'd say NOT GUILTY.....if at last, he posts a new puzzle in What Place Is It!

                • Sigve
                  Sigve commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I support yvneacs vote!

                • ombugge
                  ombugge commented
                  Editing a comment
                  And since I did not commit the offence in America the case do not arise.

                  To Yvneac; I beg forgiveness as I have been busy since solving the last one. I'll look for a suitable obscure beach, mountain, or whatever, somewhere in S.E.Asia a.s.a.p. Otherwise, please feel free to post a puzzle yourself.

              • January 15, 2015:

                The power of snow:

                In January 1993, a passenger train drove right into a snow avalanche west of Geilo, Norway. The heavy EL 14 engine crashed through the avalanche and kept on the rails until it stopped by itself. But the engine got a beating. The front windows broke and the drivers cabin were filled with snow from floor to ceiling. The poor driver sat capsuled in compact snow in his seat and could not move. He would have died from suffocation if not the train personell had dug him out so fast as they actually did. When the press arrived he was taken care of and led away. These two pictures should tell something about this very special accident.



                Regards; Sigve.
                ---
                IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                Comment


                • Tommi
                  Tommi commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Holy pancakes, now that's serious stuff.
                  Very nice documentary photography too, I can feel the coldness and seriousness of the scene.

                • Ralf__
                  Ralf__ commented
                  Editing a comment
                  At least the EL14 are stabile enough to stay on the rails. A BM73 (NSB Class 73) in 2007 did not.
                  I am glad that the driver survived. Do you know, if they improved the windows afterwards?

                • Sigve
                  Sigve commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I don't know what they did with the front windows. But at that time they no longer used the bars (#561) to protect the windows, because the line was more often supervised and there were more trains, so that snow lumps had no time to grow in the tunnel and superstructure openings. Today no bars are used. But this avalanche was very special, and what made it extra special was that it was located so close to Geilo station that you could see the lights...


              • A personal haiku, January 24, 2015:

                Haiku to Anne:

                We were one flesh, one blood
                From the depths of your ashes,
                I still feel your heartbeats

                Regards; Sigve.
                ---
                IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                Comment


                • January 29, 2015:

                  Winter ride over Hardangervidda

                  The road over Hardangervidda (Riksvei 7) in Norway is one of the thoughest winter roads excisting. When the weather turns bad, the crews have a hard job keeping keep this road (and other norwegian high mountain raods) open, and often they have to close it down for a periode of days. Driving in convoy, assisted by snowplows, often occur.

                  In november 1981 I followed such a convoy from Haugastøl on the east side to Maurset on the west side of Hardangervidda. And as you can see from these pictures, it was a though ride. The small cars often stod firm in snowdrifts and had to be towed with a chain. The wind was howling and the snow drifting and vision was nearly zero. It has happened that convoys have been stuck for hours and even days because of the weather.

                  Personally, I would not drive under such conditions at all – but in the real life, people have to go over the mountains for many reasons, so this is almost a normal occurence during winter time.

                  The difference between 1981 and 2015 is that the equipment are better, the cars are better, the crews are better trained and the security around the convoys is better today. Only 25 cars are allowed in a convoy, and only one convoy at a time.














                  (Nikon/Kodak Tri-X film)

                  And this is how it looks in summertime (the plowing sticks stand all year round, it's impractical to take them down for the short summer, and you never know when winter comes):

                  Regards; Sigve.
                  ---
                  IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                  Comment


                  • nari
                    nari commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Great photos, Sigve. I was absolutely gobsmacked by the Hardangervidda in 1997 and shivered at the thought of traffic having to cross in winter.
                    It was early October and there was snow everywhere.including on the tracks. It was for me a wonderful part of Norway then.

                • Thank you for your comment, Nari. The winter can be nice as well:

                  Regards; Sigve.
                  ---
                  IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                  Comment


                  • Wonderful photos Sigve - especially the B&W ones. The whole concept of those conditions is so alien to most of us. We've done Rv7 a few times (especially when there was still a Bergen to Newcastle boat) - but only in the summer. I have very strong recollections of a very good hotel on that route, and a very run-down one which felt like something out of Agatha Christie - especially as the door was locked behind us! Both shall remain nameless.

                    Mind you even in the summer the viddas can feel remote - on the journey north leaving Enontekio and aiming at the Norwegian border and Kautokeino across Finnmarksvidda always feels like we're leaving civilisation for a while!
                    Cheers,

                    Mark.

                    www.pologlover.co.uk

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X