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    #31
    Wonderful images from a bygone era.

    I certainly recall Polarlys of 1952. I loved the fact that she had wooden frames on the bridge windows, as opposed to Nordstjernen which did not.
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

    Comment


      #32
      January 14, 2014

      Polarlys (II), built in 1952, relieved in 1993 by Kong Harald, in 1994 sold to Mercy Ships Inc in Texas.( Ålesund, October 1990).



      After some years under the name Carribean Mercy, Polarlys II ended her career in Central America. In 2009 this picture was taken of her, lying idle somwehere in Panama, lapsing. According to Dag Bakka’s book about Hurtigruten, she was scrapped in 2010.


      (Photographer unknown, picture provided by a former member of another maritime forum).
      Regards; Sigve.
      ---
      IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

      Comment


        #33
        January 15, 2014
        DREAM SHIP
        Once I dreamed of going to far places with the World Discoverer. This ship always fascinated me after I saw her the first time, in Geiranger, about 1990. Then she was shining red, obviously newly painted. Later she was painted blue.
        PS: If somebody could provide the GA plans for her, I would be very happy!


        (Geiranger, about 1990, Nikon, Kodak Ectachrome film)

        Wikipedia says:
        The vessel was originally built as the BEWA Discoverer in 1974.[3] In July 1976, the vessel was again sold to Adventure Cruises, Inc. and was renamed the World Discoverer. The ship also became a long-term charter to Society Expeditions. In 1976, the ship was registered in Singapore. In 1987, Society Expedition came under new ownership and was renamed Society Expedition Cruises, with offices in Seattle and Germany. The vessel had a double hull construction, allowing for periodic voyages to the Antarctic polar regions to allow its passengers to observe ice floe movements and providing protection for minor impacts.


        (Geiranger, about 1990, Nikon, Kodak Tri-X film)

        The World Discoverer was classified as a Swedish/Finnish 1A Ice Class, allowing the ship to withstand minor floe impacts.[5] The World Discoverer also had an 8,000 miles (13,000 km) cruising range, allowing the ship to travel the Northwest Passage. Society Expeditions hired a small team of experienced expedition leaders to answer tourist questions concerning the region, ice floes, their movements, and the ship's destinations. A small fleet of dinghies landed passengers on various shorelines for observation of local wildlife in the area. Each day comprised typically two to three shore expeditions, led by geologists, historians, naturalists, and marine biologists. The ship was equipped with an observation lounge, medical center with an active physician, library, sun deck with a small swimming pool, small fitness center, and a lecture hall.[6]

        On Sunday April 30, 2000, at 4 p.m. local time (0500 GMT), the ship struck a large uncharted rock or reef in the Sandfly Passage, Solomon Islands. Captain Oliver Kruess sent a distress signal, which was received in Honiara, the Solomon Islands' capital city. A passenger ferry was dispatched to the ship and all passengers were then transported to safety. The captain then brought the ship into Roderick Bay after the ship began to list 20 degrees and grounded it to avoid sinking. After underwater surveying of the ship, the World Discoverer was declared a "constructive loss". The ship has remained in Roderick Bay ever since.[7] There were no reports of any oil, petroleum or other pollutant spills as a result of the impact.

        Regards; Sigve.
        ---
        IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

        Comment


          #34
          January 16, 2014.

          Have a taste. Horses, grazing. Ebeltoft, Denmark, July 2007.

          Regards; Sigve.
          ---
          IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

          Comment


          • Tommi
            Tommi commented
            Editing a comment
            Such a strange framing, but still very nice and interesting.

          • PoloUK
            PoloUK commented
            Editing a comment
            All of the photos are excellent Sigve, but the unusual view on that one really works!

          #35
          January 17, 2014

          The Captain at the wheel


          (Aboard Nordlys, July 1998, Nikon, Fuji Provia film)
          Last edited by Sigve; January 17th, 2014, 07:34.
          Regards; Sigve.
          ---
          IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

          Comment


            #36
            January 18, 2014

            This one is for Sterkoder; Nordkapp in Kristiansund, June 1999.


            (Fuji Velvia film)
            Regards; Sigve.
            ---
            IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

            Comment


              #37
              January 19, 2014

              Iconic ship:

              Aristocrat and veteran; Fennia in the Baltic Sea off Åland one sunny summer day. 34 years beetween Sweden, Åland and Finland (plus some more lines). She was at the time the largest ferry in traffic between Finland and Sweden. If I remember correctly, there was a panorama saloon in her fake funnel midships.



              (June 1982, Kodak Echtachrome film)

              Built in 1966 as Fennia for Silja Line. During her long career Fennia also sailed for Jakob Lines and Vasabåtarna, and spent short times chartered to Sessan Linjen, SAGA Linjen, B&I Line, Baltic Line and SeaWind Line. In 2001 the ship was sold to RG Line and renamed Casino Express.
              In 2007, after being laid up since 2005, the ship was sold to Attar Construction Ltd and renamed C. Express. Concerned about the hazardous materials inside the ship, the Finnish Environment Institute issued a transport ban on the vessel to prevent her from being moved for scrapping in inappropriate conditions. The ban was lifted in July 2009 and the ship, renamed Onyx, left Finland in late 2009. In April 2010 the ship changed hands again and the new owner, Red Line Shipping Ltd, renamed her Kaptain Boris and sailed her directly to Gadani Beach, Pakistan, where she was beached for scrapping on 8 May 2010, and that was the end of a 44 year long career.
              Last edited by Sigve; January 19th, 2014, 08:18.
              Regards; Sigve.
              ---
              IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

              Comment


                #38
                January 20, 2014


                In 1984 I met the trucker Arvid J from Moss. He was driving a tank trailer with chemicals for a cellullose factory which no longer exists.



                He had a very nice truck with a beautiful cab. There was the neatest order I have seen. I was not permitted to enter the cab with my shoes on. Neither did Arvid. He kicked off his clogs as soon as he came in and took on his slippers. His wife had sewn curtains. The walls were covered with velvet. As you can see, he had a selection of cassettes (country/trucking no doubt) and a TV to watch when resting. I was impressed.



                Later, I saw many nice truck-cabs, but not one so cosy as this.


                (February 1984, Nikon, Kodak Echtachrome film).
                Regards; Sigve.
                ---
                IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                Comment


                  #39
                  the old skool trucks like them more and more every day,i'm getting old.
                  seeing formiliar things like the make up mirrors with lights in them (didn't have them),the yellow flower vase (got 2 of them,red,still have them i believe).

                  every thing was so much nicer that days in my trucking carreer.
                  best regards Thijs

                  Comment


                    #40
                    January 21, 2014

                    The bow of Nordstjernen has plowed many a wave (and crashed into a dock or two....).


                    (April 2005)
                    Regards; Sigve.
                    ---
                    IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                    Comment


                    • Seagull
                      Seagull commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Marvellous captured moment in time in the Old Lady's story.

                    #41
                    Can't tell you how much i like this thread, Sigve. So interesting ship stories and histories. I remember how we searched the Caribbean Mercy during those days in the old forum. I found her in a list waiting for the crossing of the Panama Canal.
                    Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

                    Comment


                      #42
                      January 22, 2014

                      Highland adventures. (This one is for Seagull)

                      In January 1983, I went to Scotland. I flew to Newcastle, and then took the train to Edinburgh, then on to Inverness, Glasgow and back to Newcastle. The weather was grey, but not wet. The Edinburgh – Inverness train was long, oldfashioned and with almost no people. I had a coupe for myself and felt like taking part in a Agatha Christie movie. It was dark inside, with almost no lights. The killer could come anytime. I felt. But only the conductor came. Fortunately I had a couple of beers and two minibottles of Glenfiddich on which I fortified myself until I reached Inverness alive in the evening. After leaving Edinburgh I took some pictures from the train window before it went too dark. (I tried to do it in the best W. Eugene Smith style, I had seen some magnificent pictures he had taken in China from trains). But today I'’m not sure if these pictures are taken on the Inverness line or the Glasgow line. (There was no exif information on the film in those days to help). Maybe Seagull knows?


                      Edinburgh, Sir Walter Scott Memorial.











                      (January 1983, Nikon, Kodak Tri-X film).

                      (This story may be continued on a later occasion. Perhaps.)
                      Regards; Sigve.
                      ---
                      IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                      Comment


                      • yvneac
                        yvneac commented
                        Editing a comment
                        WOW.These B/W photos,what a thrill.

                      #43
                      Wonderfully evocative black and white photography, and story to go with them!

                      You can see the industrial area of Grangemouth on the last two photos. This is located close to the town of Falkirk, on the route of both Edinburgh to Glasgow and Edinburgh to Inverness trains. There is another route Edinburgh to Inverness that turns off close to Edinburgh and crosses the famous Forth Rail Bridge and around the Fife coast.

                      So if you remember crossing that bridge on your Inverness journey (and you'd be unlikely to forget if you did!), then these photos would have been taken on your other trip to Glasgow.

                      But if you don't remember the Forth Bridge, then your route to Inverness would be via Falkirk, and the photos could have been from either trip.

                      Photo 4 is interesting as the hill in the picture is actually a spoil tip, locally called a 'bing', from the days of the oil shale industry. They are a bright orange-red-pink in colour. Some of these have been removed and the land returned to agriculture. Others left as wasteland have in recent times become more appreciated as a new environment and nature reserve with distinctive vegetation and habitat for wildlife and rare species of plants. Some have been landscaped and serve as a recreational area, and reminder of the former industrial heritage and social history.

                      Comment


                      • Sigve
                        Sigve commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Thank you for your nice comments! And thank you to Seagull for your local knowlegde. I think this must have been the Edinburgh - Falkirk - Inverness line. I can't remember the Firth of Forth bridge, and can't find it on my negatives. I'll return to Scotland later in this thread (don't know when), so stay tuned..!

                      #44
                      January 23, 2014

                      Summer idyll in the Baltic:

                      Viking Sally entering the harbour of Mariehamn, Åland, June 1983. Later she was known as Estonia.

                      Viking Sally (1980–1990), Silja Star (−1991), Wasa King (−1993) and Estonia (-1994) was a cruise ferry built in 1979/80 at the German shipyard Meyer Werft in Papenburg. The ship sank in 1994 in the Baltic Sea in one of the worst maritime disasters of the 20th century. It is the deadliest shipwreck disaster to have occurred in the Baltic Sea in peacetime, costing 852 lives.


                      (June 1983; Nikon, Kodak Echtachrome film)

                      Wikipedia says: The Estonia disaster occurred on Wednesday, 28 September 1994 as the ship was crossing the Baltic Sea, en route from Tallinn, Estonia, to Stockholm. Estonia was on a scheduled crossing with departure at 19:00 on 27 September. She had been expected in Stockholm the next morning at about 09:30. She was carrying 989 people: 803 passengers and 186 crew. Most of the passengers were Scandinavian, while most of the crew members were Estonian. Several Swedish passengers were of Estonian origin, having visited the country they fled 50 years ago. The ship was fully loaded, and was listing slightly to port because of poor cargo distribution.
                      According to the final disaster report the weather was rough, with a wind of 15 to 20 metres per second (29 to 39 kn; 34 to 45 mph), force 7–8 on the Beaufort scale and a significant wave height of 4 to 6 metres (13 to 20 ft compared with the highest measured significant wave height in the Baltic Sea of 7.7 metres (25.3 ft). Esa Mäkelä, the captain of Silja Europa who was appointed on scene commander for the subsequent rescue effort, described the weather as "normally bad", or like a typical autumn storm in the Baltic Sea. All scheduled passenger ferries were at sea.
                      Regards; Sigve.
                      ---
                      IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                      Comment


                        #45
                        Such a variety of great pictures Sigve.

                        Comment


                        • Sigve
                          Sigve commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Thank you, Tommi. Your comment is much appreciated.
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