Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sigve's Gallery

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • July 9, 2014:


    Sanct Svithun, 1950 - 1962, DSD - Det Stavangerske Dampskibsselskab.



    (Old postcard)
    Last edited by Sigve; July 9th, 2014, 08:27.
    Regards; Sigve.
    ---
    IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

    Comment


    • July 10. 2014:
      Meteor 1952 – 1958/1970 BDS


      (Old postcard)
      Last edited by Sigve; July 10th, 2014, 14:18.
      Regards; Sigve.
      ---
      IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

      Comment


      • July 10, 2014:

        A bonus today: Just as I chequed Ålesund havn's webcamera to see if Nordnorge was on schedule, I saw MSC Magnifica sneaking in from the fog:



        On the next picture, she was preparing to dock:



        And on the third picture, Magnifica was docked, and Nordnorge had left for her Geiranger call:

        Last edited by Sigve; July 10th, 2014, 14:19.
        Regards; Sigve.
        ---
        IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

        Comment


        • I am catching up the last week, because i had another business trip with no minute left for the forum (o.k. i admit, these minutes were reservated for the Brazil World Championship), and such a welcome back! Wonderful pictures combined with those beautiful postcards, A pity that no ship of the "Meteor -Class" survived. Or does anybody know?
          Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

          Comment


          • July 11,2014:

            Thank you for your nice comment, Ralph.

            No, Meteor was the one and only of her kind. Nordstjernen is the only one that bears a resemblance, but smaller.



            (Unknown photographer).

            From her career:
            1955: Delivered to BDS (Bergenske Dampskipsselskap).
            1955-58: Stand in-ship in Hurtigruten, and cruising.
            1958 – 1970: Cruising, Mediteranean, Carribean. Then sold.
            1971: Destroyed by fire in Vancouver. 32 crew lost their life. Sold and repaired.
            1972: Named Neptune. New career, cruising in the Mediterranean, but also Europe (including north Cape).
            1995: Laid up in Hellas.
            2002: Scrapped in Aliaga, Turkey.
            Regards; Sigve.
            ---
            IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

            Comment


            • July 12, 2014:


              Håkon Jarl:

              1952 -– 1982 (NFDS) (Det Nordenfjeldske Dampskipsselskap, Trondheim).

              Håkon Jarl was the sister of Nordlys and Polarlys, the only difference was the machinery and the raised wheelhouse. (You could say there was a resemblance between Håkon Jarl and Meteor, but Meteor was bigger).



              Old postcard.


              1983: Sold, and then sold again. In the years to come, she was a restaurant ship in Oslo.
              1991: Sold to Antwerpen, Belgium, as a restaurant ship. Later named Diamond Princess. And there she lies today, unrecognizable....

              Have a look here:

              http://www.captainsvoyage-forum.com/...princess-hotel

              It's such a pity to see her like this...!
              Last edited by Sigve; July 12th, 2014, 08:38.
              Regards; Sigve.
              ---
              IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

              Comment


              • July 12, 2014:

                A bonus for today, as well.

                – Midnatsol and Trollfjord meet in Trondheim.

                The southbound Midnatsol is the first to dock. Then comes Trollfjord.



                Backing beyond and behind Midnatsol is a mates test.



                Backing beyond and behind the soutbound is a mates test.



                At last the northbound Midnatsol has found her regular berth at the quay.



                Pictures from Trondheim havn webcam. Sorry for the slow refreshing rate, I nearly missed it.

                See also post #246.
                Regards; Sigve.
                ---
                IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                Comment


                • July 13, 2014:

                  Håkon Jarl:

                  1952 -– 1982 (NFDS) (Det Nordenfjeldske Dampskipsselskap, Trondheim).



                  (Old postcard)
                  Regards; Sigve.
                  ---
                  IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                  Comment


                  • July 13, 2014:

                    Todays extra:

                    When checking Ålesund havns webcamera this morning, I find the private yacht Skat, 70,7 meter, built 2002 by Lürssen, Germany. Exterior design by Espen Oeino, the norwegian yacht designer who lives and works in Monaco. He has designed a wide range of superyachts, among them Paul Allen's (Microsoft) 126 m Octopus. His latest yacht is the 95 m Kismet, built for «a very experienced client». In this world, owners and guests are usually a heavily guarded secret.



                    (From Ålesund havn)



                    (From Lürssens website)

                    And to be earnest; who wouldn’t like to cruise the Norwegian fjords in a boat like this…?
                    Last edited by Sigve; July 13th, 2014, 10:04.
                    Regards; Sigve.
                    ---
                    IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                    Comment


                    • July 14, 2014:

                      A fairy tale (See also post #309)

                      The story about Espen Oeino is a kind of fairytale. The norwegian boy, with roots in the mountains (where I live), but with a great interest in ships, educated in shipbuilding and as a naval architect, is now one of the worlds leading designers of luxury yachts, super yachts, mega yachts and super mega yachts. Silver Yachts and Lürssen is two of the brands where he is instrumental. Make a Google search, and learn more about him.



                      He now runs his own business in Monaco, Espen Oeino Naval Architects.

                      First time I met him was in Oslo in 2004, where he presented his (then) two newest yachts, Queen M (Now Queen K) and Phoenix. And since then, I get his Christmas Card every year!

                      Phoenix:



                      Queen M (later renamed Queen K):

                      Regards; Sigve.
                      ---
                      IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                      Comment


                      • July15, 2014:

                        Håkon Jarl:

                        1952 – 1982

                        HJ was the sister of Nordlys and Polarlys, the only difference was the machinery and the rasied wheelhouse.



                        (Old postcard)
                        Regards; Sigve.
                        ---
                        IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                        Comment


                        • July 16, 2014:

                          I said earlier (post # 241) that I would return to the tragic fate of the ferry Gudvangen, and now the time is in.

                          Gudvangen once was the pride of Fylkesbaatane i Sogn & Fjordane, in service from 1954 to 1980 and then sold.



                          (Picture from post # 241)

                          In 1981 she ended up in Sweden and was renamed G. A. Skytte (I don’t know the background for the name). She had different jobs until she in 1992 was sold to interests in Gøteborg and in 1993 sold to a company with the same name. As far as I can understand, much of her later life was as a restaurant ship.
                          Fate was good to her until April 2006, when she was badly damaged in a fire.
                          In May 2006 she was towed to Frederikshavn and thereafter scrapped at the Orskov Yard.


                          And this is where my story begins:

                          In June 2006 we were vacationing in Frederikshavn. At that time you could go freely on the molos and piers. And I did. One day when I was walking on the long outer molo, I saw a familiar sight which I recognized from pictures; good old Gudvangen. Laying at the demolition yard, but her typical front was very easy to recognize. The had started to scrap her. How sad!







                          (Nikon digital photos, June 2006)

                          (To be continued)
                          Regards; Sigve.
                          ---
                          IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                          Comment


                          • July 17, 2014:

                            The tragic fate of BF Gudvangen - continued:


                            In the next few days I saw her every day, and every day there was less and less left of her. I think she was made of solid steel, but even the most robust steel can’t withstand the jaws of the demolition bulldozers and cranes. They even needed an old tank to destroy her.









                            And then, on my last day in Frederikshavn, there was nothing left of her except a heap of debris. Oh yes! One thing was left. Her bow port! I don’t know what her architects had calculated she would encounter in her life, but her bow port was like a part of Tirpitz!
                            What a tragic end to a ship which in her time was the pride of Sognefjorden! You just have a look at post # 241!
                            Regards; Sigve.
                            ---
                            IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

                            Comment


                            • PoloUK
                              PoloUK commented
                              Editing a comment
                              I find it strange that a lump of metal can take on such a character and evoke strong emotions when it's returned to its component parts - but it really does doesn't it! I suppose that ships in particular, but some aeroplanes, cars and other structures can stir some sort of weird emotion in us that gives them some form of life. Looking at that wonderful photo of BF Gudvangen in her prime, and then seeing her being ripped apart like that is difficult - perhaps because of the love, care and skill that went into designing her, building her and keeping her running - perhaps because of the joy that she brought people visiting the fjords - perhaps because of the stories that she played a part in, people travelling for happy events, sad events or just normal life. It doesn't it any harder when they appear to resist destruction - that last bit of metal that was so strong even when it had nothing else to hang on to.

                              For me the videos on CVF and elsewhere of the Dover - Calais P&O Ferry which became 'Ostend Spirit' being run aground in Alagia recently stirs the same sort of emotion. That vessel had little value on routes other than the one she'd been built for, and performed brilliantly on for 30 years, so her fate was sealed. It was easy to assign some form of character to her too as she steamed to Turkey under her own power at well over 20 knots, and then steadfastly refused to be beached the first time.

                              Funny things people - our brains work in odd ways.

                          • I just want to say an inadequate thank you for Sigve's extraordinary series of images and Polo's words.

                            Comment


                            • It is a feeling most of us share, Mark. Whether or not it is a human weakness to allot some form of anthropomorphism to objects as well as to other forms of life I don't know, but I see it as a delight. But to watch a well-known vessel being steadily demolished must be painful - part of your own life disappearing with it.
                              I had a similar feeling in 1952 when the last London tram ran through Plumstead, my home town in London. The clanking, rocking old vehicles that could be heard from a far distance groaning along the rails, and which had been part of my young life, were at last to disappear.
                              Imagine my joy, therefore, when I discovered that one of the last few London trams to be preserved was not far from here at Carlton ColvilleTransport Museum, near Lowestoft. Imagine my almost disbelieving gasp when I found it in the shed undergoing restoration and discovered it was one of "my" trams, the no. 38. Then imagine how I felt when at my next visit it was up and running and I dashed upstairs for a ride.
                              Sorry, Sigve, for temporarily hijacking your thread! But emotional flashbacks can be catching.
                              Ivy

                              "To thine own self be true.......
                              Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X