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  • Photo Assignment: Abandoned boats

    these 3 'retired' fishing boats have been moored at this jetty on the Isle of Mull for several years. I know my Husband's friend repaired the hull of one (front right) because I drove them over on the ferry.

    Nothing is going to save them now (the boats that is, not my Husband & his friend ).






  • #2
    better news for this one

    This boat has been sitting on the beach for several months (years?) and has become the subject for many photographs on Flickr.

    The good news is that yesterday I heard they were starting to demolish the wheelhouse in preparation for restoration/rebuild into a motor cruiser- so of course I had to visit with my camera and what better excuse to sit on the rocks eating an ice-cream.



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    • #3
      A great new thread... would love to see more under this subject being posted.
      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
      Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
      Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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      • #4
        Hey, great thread!!!!

        As sad as it might be to see boats, and maybe later ships, in this condition..., as abandoned houses/buildings they also have "something"...

        One thing is for sure, they are great photo objects. Really look forward to more contributions in the future, should anyone else spot abandoned boats
        "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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        • #5
          What a great idea for a thread. I am surprised it has not come up already.

          I spent the past weekend looking at Gackie Gleasons yacht. Not exactly abandoned but dragged off the bottom after sinkning. I am not kicking myself for not taking pictures.

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          • #6
            The abandoned boats of Sisimiut

            Sisimiut is the second largest town in Greenland, situated just north of the Arctic Circle. The town itself is largely built on higher ground above the harbour, but I had wandered along from the quay, past the paraphernalia of the busy fishing port and beyond the cliff-like stacks of containers (we are talking prawns big time around here!).

            Passing what in Norway I would have called the “small boat harbour” – there was even a modest blue building proclaiming itself to be the Sisimiut Boat Club – I continued along a quieter shore road where even the howls of the sled dogs seemed somewhat muted. And there between the road and the water I came across an abandoned boat.


            I paused to take a photograph before wandering on, only to be confronted with a second boat, conspicuously missing its upper timbers along the starboard flank, but still upright, propped in position by miscellaneous items of wood and crates and boards.





            There is yet another boat next to it! Masts still intact, blue paint less peeled. And all around these abandoned fishing boats are smaller boats, some in an even greater state of disrepair, others perhaps still seaworthy though it is difficult to be quite sure.




            I’d covered quite some distance by this time, and was still encountering boats in varying stages of decay. What was the significance of these white painted words I wondered… just some random graffiti, or was it someone’s rejoinder to the boat owner? – my ever-inquiring mind was flicking through the possibilities. A name most likely, but was that a full stop or a hyphen, a J or an I? I wanted it to be Harald-Jarl like a former ship of the hurtigruten fleet! More likely just H and surname Ivakkao. That could even be the owner himself, the painted message a gentle reminder “She's still mine, keep off! – I might have second thoughts and get her ship-shape again next season”. For sure she didn’t look in so bad a state compared with some of the others.


            Here’s something a bit different, looking more like wreckage and certainly a long way beyond any second thoughts.


            It was only when I reached another peeling red-painted boat that I consciously became aware of the blue notices. This one was prominently affixed to the hull and despite the rubbish-strewn overgrown grass I was able to get close enough to read it.



            It was indeed a very official looking notice, bearing the shield of the Qeqqata Kommune.
            I sat down nearby on a conveniently flat-topped rock, disentangled rucksack and camera straps from around my neck, and rummaged in the rucksack for my notebook. From the moment of booking the Greenland voyage aboard Hurtigruten’s Fram almost a year previously, I had jotted down all sorts of bits of information about Greenland, and yes, here it was – Qeqqata, formed from the amalgamation of former municipalities early in 2009 and having its administrative centre in Sisimiut.
            Time to test how my smattering of Swedish and travels in Norway via Copenhagen could cope with officialdom’s Danish! At least it was shorter and vastly more intelligible-looking than the Greenlandic equivalent. Later that day, on joining an organised hike with a local guide, I had the opportunity to confirm my understanding of the situation.
            The new municipality is keen to tidy-up the city. Once a notice has been served on an abandoned boat, the owner has three months to remove it. After that period has elapsed, the authorities take it for incineration, and the municipality will have no liability for the boat owner’s loss.


            Later that afternoon I came across a more fortunate boat, reincarnated into a meaningful second life as a children’s play place. But this was the exception.

            The theme of disposal and abandonment and the attitudes to waste in different cultures was one that would recur frequently throughout my travels in Greenland. It just happened to be the abandoned boats of Sisimiut that I encountered first.
            As I write this, the little red boat should have been removed two weeks ago. I wonder if it has. But actions are not always close on the heels of intentions, and as I think about the approach of an arctic winter I wonder if that boat might not still be lying there on the shore beneath a blanket of fresh snow.

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            • #7
              I noticed something similar inland in Alaska, USA. Once you get away from the cities and tourist areas. There is a lot of junk cars, equipment and garbage. Some of it going back 100 years. I suppose that the weather is so harsh and life so hard that no energy was spent disposing of old items. They are just abandoned where they stopped working.

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              • #8
                Oh... this wonderful thread had slipped my mind!

                Thank you very much for kicking it back alive, this is a wonderful thread which we should work on updating more frequently!
                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
                  I noticed something similar inland in Alaska, USA. Once you get away from the cities and tourist areas. There is a lot of junk cars, equipment and garbage. Some of it going back 100 years. I suppose that the weather is so harsh and life so hard that no energy was spent disposing of old items. They are just abandoned where they stopped working.
                  Yes. That is very much the case, Dane. And it happens on islands a lot too (including here in Scotland) where proper disposal of larger items to the mainland –cars, fridges, that sort of thing –could entail effort and cost.

                  But in the remoter settlements in Greenland, there is more to it than just that. Consider everyday garbage for example. It was explained to us tourists that it is to a large extent a cultural thing. It’s not so long ago that folk were living a very traditional hunting/fishing way of life; imagine sitting eating, scraps are just tossed aside, but its all biodegradable. But then came the sudden impact of another culture of coke-tins and supermarket packaging, and that gets tossed aside as they have always done, but it stays there. It takes a few generations to adjust to our norms of garbage collection. I found all this absolutely fascinating and will be returning to such themes in further “Glimpses of Greenland” in other threads.

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                  • #10
                    Abandoned boat at Ranheim:

                    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Abandoned ship at Batam, Indonesia:


                      And an abandoned Bugis Prahu:

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                      • #12
                        in Hammerfest



                        Doris

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                        • #13
                          On a car-trip on E-39 Trondheim-Molde, I suddenly saw this boat (or whatever it may be called) at Vinjeøra.



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                          • #14




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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by HurtigruteMartin View Post
                              On a car-trip on E-39 Trondheim-Molde, I suddenly saw this boat (or whatever it may be called) at Vinjeøra.



                              Hahahaha...., I belive these kind of boats change their skin during that time of year...
                              "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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