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Photo Assignment: Rocks and Stones

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  • #61
    Re: Photo Assignment: Rocks and Stones

    Originally posted by Seagull View Post
    What time of day was it taken?
    All photos were taken between 12:50 -13:00, it was a relatively good light outdoors to be in the end of December
    Best wishes from
    Bengt Domben

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    • #62
      There are other large rocks around near the houses at Tomasjordnes in Tromsø that are less changing than our “CV stone” which constantly responds to tides and weather and the ever shifting sand on the beach.

      Some of these bigger stones may have been left in their original place when the houses were built (something I have also seen in Sweden, and which delights me…it’s a Troll Stone thing!)
      Others have been dumped as part of little embankments at the edges of the building site.

      In these two photos, I wanted to show the relationship of rocks and buildings, and the thing that attracted me was the colours of the rocks seen against those of the houses… in one case matching rusty brown orange tones. The other is greys and whites, but with that wonderful warm contrast of the red wall inside the apartments, which gives to me such a cosy feel.





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      • #63
        Bjørnevatn mine, Kirkenes

        In the thread of autumn Hurtigruten voyages, Keelson mentioned the ore mine in Bjørnevatn, an excursion that can be taken when the ship is in Kirkenes. As promised, here are a few of the photos which I took in 2003 (with a Nikon E990).




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        • #64


          Even if the weather had not been so clear, there were lots of rocks around to take a close look at!

          But it was good weather that day, and I took five photos (no tripod)...and joined them up as a panorama!!!!!

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          • #65
            Re: Photo Assignment: Rocks and Stones

            Looks very interesting. What a pity, that the current excursion doesn't show this.
            with kind regards,
            Joachim

            hurtigforum.de / hurtigwiki.de

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            • #66
              Re: Bjørnevatn mine, Kirkenes

              Originally posted by Seagull View Post
              The area excavated is absolutely massive. !
              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
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              • #67
                Oh my, I see I have not posted anything in this thread for four whole years Although that is not necessarily a bad thing at all, for it may well have served its original purpose in encouraging more 'rocks and stones awareness'. That is most definitely apparent in so many threads and photos now, and in many contexts - art and architecture and the urban environment as well as in nature and landscape.
                I'm here again simply because I found I'd prepared too many photos of a stone works visit from a Fram cruise excursion than would be appropriate to post on that ship's thread. You'll find that afternoon on Værlandet in the west of Norway is briefly described here.

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                • #68


                  I do need to repost one photo again here in order to point out the three different local rock types.

                  These slabs have been cut and polished. On the left are two slabs of greenstone, actually a greenish black colour. This is a metamorphic rock which was originally deposited as lava, and is the oldest geologically. In the middle is a slab of breccia, a variant unique to Værlandet and marketed as the name "Black Beauty". The slab on the right, and geologically the youngest of the three rock types, is a conglomerate. This is a sedimentary rock containing pieces of previously existing rocks which had been transported by rivers. These pieces tend to become a more rounded shape in the process, and are preserved within a finer grained 'matrix' which derives from sand, clay and mud.

                  The paving stone shows the appearance of the rock where a matt finish is required.


                  Detail of the conglomerate.

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                  • #69


                    View across to part of the quarry showing the rock in situ.


                    Cut slabs




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                    • #70
                      Processing the stone







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                      • #71





                        Finally, some examples of outdoor furniture made from the stone.

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                        • #72
                          I have seen in Thailand, and other countries in Asia as well, stone and concrete garden furniture. It sounds like it wouldn't be the best looking materials but these above, are actually beautiful sets.
                          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                          Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                          Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                          Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                          Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                          Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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                          • #73
                            Walking inn the grounds at Sunnmore Museum the other day I noticed this white line in some exposed rocks. The direction of the line is very different to the way the general structure of the rock is laid down:

                            How does this happen? (No, it is not some joker that has painted the line)

                            PS> This may not be so unusual, as seen in post #62-2

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                            • Seagull
                              Seagull commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Not unusual. It looks like a quartz vein which has crystallised out from an aqueous solution within a fault or fissure in the pre-existing rock.
                              I sometimes think the term 'vein' can be a bit confusing in an example like this as it suggests a tube-like shape, whereas it is actually a sheet. You can visualise the quartz sheet continuing beneath the rock in the top right part of the photo.

                            • ombugge
                              ombugge commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Thanks for that explanation.
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