Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Starbucks Coffee Around in the United States and around the World

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Even though it was after midnight when we returned to Hong Kong, I managed to spy one in the airport...

    Comment


      #17
      This post is aimed at ehp in plenty of time for her visit to Copenhagen, a few days prior to her family cruise. As I will only catch up with her on the ship’s departure day, there is something rather important to tell her: as far as I am aware there are only two Starbucks in Denmark, and they are both in Copenhagen airport! One is landside in the terminal building, and the other airside in the transit/shopping area.
      Sorry – before pakarang’s influence it would never have occurred to me to photograph such places!

      At the risk of becoming unpopular, I will admit that I hope it stays at two, because Sweden is only just across the bridge, rather too near I’d say if Starbucks start proliferating in Denmark! Swedish coffee is most definitely something I’ve acquired a taste for, especially those blends popular in the southernmost region: Zoega’s Skånerost and their Mollbergs blend being my favourites. Umm . . . oh, and I adore Swedish chocolate too, especially Marabou mörk choklad – that’s dark chocolate . . .

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by Seagull View Post
        Sorry – before pakarang’s influence it would never have occurred to me to photograph such places!
        You should only know how much it means and have meant to me, that I have been able to influence you and some others around the world. My mission is in a way being fulfilled! Thanks for picking up the tab, so to speak...
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

        Comment


          #19
          Oh, I think it is safe to say that, were it not for the Captain's influence, there are many MANY things that each and every member would have NEVER thought to photograph!!

          Comment


            #20
            Copenhagen airport – the furthest frontier of Starbucks in Scandinavia!
            And there are two of them, one airside and one landside.



            As I made a connecting flight at Copenhagen, it was the airside branch that I photographed first. No I didn’t sample the coffee – the lure of an egg and prawn open sandwich at another food outlet seemed more inviting . . .



            Returning from Tromsø to Copenhagen later in my trip I was just about to head down to the train for the city centre when I remembered that there was supposed to be another Starbucks landside. I must have walked right past it.
            The things I do for our Captain! About turn and struggle back through the queues of people and their luggage at the check in and baggage drop. Ah there it is . . . extract camera from rucksack . . . click . . . mission accomplished! Head down to the trains to find I just missed one. And, after the hugs and kisses, that was more or less the very first thing I said when ehp and I met. “I would have been here earlier but I’d missed photographing a Starbucks”.

            Comment


              #21
              She's not kidding...it really was pretty much the first thing she said!!!! Hilarious!!!!

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by Seagull View Post
                The things I do for our Captain! About turn and struggle back through the queues of people and their luggage at the check in and baggage drop. Ah there it is . . . extract camera from rucksack . . . click . . . mission accomplished! Head down to the trains to find I just missed one. And, after the hugs and kisses, that was more or less the very first thing I said when ehp and I met. “I would have been here earlier but I’d missed photographing a Starbucks”.
                Ahhh... Starbucks.... where have you been in my life...

                "I have trained you well" (from the movie Star Wars)
                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Starbucks under the Bridge

                  Here is a small Starbucks outlet tucked away under Esplanade Bridge in Singapore: (The F1 racers will be speeding up just above here, after they have made the sharp turn from Anderson Bridge)

                  I didn't stop for a plastic cup of latte ... (whatever) as I'm more partial to "Kopi O", served in an old fashion traditional cup, with a Chinese spoon in it.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Drinking coffee in Edinburgh

                    Here it is at last (and only two days late!) – a totally pakarang-influenced assignment which became a special birthday gift for our dear darling Captain. But I am sure he will be delighted to share it with you all. So fill your mugs, curl up in a comfy chair, and enjoy . . .

                    Drinking coffee in Edinburgh


                    I never really noticed it happening. Only that suddenly one day I found myself thinking what a lot of coffee shops there were. Not just little local cafes of the kind that Edinburgh has always had, and still has in profusion, but BRANDS. It may even have taken me some time to identify them as such, perhaps only when I had become consciously aware of two or three with the same name, colour scheme and prominent logo. Statistical probability and all that.

                    Ok, this is going to sound incredibly naive, but I will have to admit it – at that time (perhaps two, three, or was it even four years ago) I had not actually heard of Starbucks.
                    “Oh come on” I hear you exclaim, “you can’t be serious . . .”.
                    What kind of a sheltered existence does a person who has never heard of Starbucks lead? Where do they hang out for goodness sake? Don’t they get out, get around, travel?
                    Travel, yes, I do travel. Sweden, Norway . . .
                    Ah, Scandinavia! Even to this day a Starbucks-free zone!

                    It’s no good, try as I might I just cannot remember the very first time I walked into a branch of Starbucks, or any of their competitors for that matter. But I can remember, in the clear uncomfortable way one always remembers embarrassing or awkward situations, once having difficulty requesting a cup of coffee. It wasn’t even in a cafe as such, but one of those temporary places that spring up annually during the Edinburgh International Festival. There was a long queue of impatient and irritable people, grabbing a coffee between a hectic schedule of concerts and shows– and then there was me.
                    I asked for a coffee and got a look of total and utter exasperation from the assistant who I had already observed to be as impatient and irritable as most of her customers. She shouted a number of words, the meaning of which eluded me, but which from the question-like tone seemed to imply a choice had to be made. I hesitated. She repeated the words, only louder, MUCH louder. Everyone in the queue suddenly seemed to have stopped chattering, awaiting my reply.

                    Perhaps by now assuming deafness, a list was thrust into my hand. Now my previous experience of ordering coffee was really rather simple:- black or white. That covered the majority of situations, though for sure I had come to terms with espresso and cappuccino. As neither of these options appeared on the list, I asked for the first item, which happened to be latte. Eventually I had to point to this word LATTE. It seemed exotic. I don’t think I had any idea what it was or how to pronounce it!

                    In the contrast of the co-existing but opposite extremes that constitute my personality, my friends and work mates in those days actually considered my coffee drinking habits to be extremely sophisticated. Not for me the spoonfuls of instant powder or granules. No, I had discovered pre-ground filter coffee to be nearly as convenient and quick but much better tasting, and was equipped with a funnel and filter papers at both home and work. I returned from trips to Sweden smelling of coffee and laden with boxes full of Skånerost and Mollbergs blandning.


                    But if that first latte was a challenge, how do coffee-novices manage today when confronted with the likes of Caffe Mocha, Caramel Macchiato, Frappuccino, Caffe Americano, Ristretto . . .
                    At the time when it became fashionable for restaurant menus to take half a page to describe a dish, its ingredients, embellishments and presentation in long adjective-rich sentences, one was somehow supposed to know what was what in the world of coffee without detailed specifications. And then there were the possible additions of this or that, sometimes incurring an extra charge, not to mention a bewildering range of size options. In some establishments this was all displayed above the back of the counter, reaching to the ceiling and resembling some gigantic Excel spreadsheet.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      I suppose it started, the transformation of this city, when the banks, having persuaded their customers to adopt online services, found they didn’t need quite so many buildings. Edinburgh’s once rather staid George Street, running parallel to the shops and stores of Princes Street, had many grandiose banking halls, temple-like with domes and columns and monumental staircases and stained glass windows. Within a comparatively short time they had become bars and restaurants, and, in defiance of the Scottish weather and former local laws prohibiting consumption of alcohol in view of the public street, had even expanded with tables and seating out onto the pavement. And so the time was right for smaller vacant premises to open as coffee outlets, whilst a little further from the centre, I noticed that a smaller bank branch had in turn been transformed into, yes, a Starbucks!


                      Here is that Starbucks in former bank premises at 123 Lothian Road.


                      This George Street Starbucks occupies a building at the corner of Castle Street, now a paved pedestrian area, thus allowing space for outside seating to spread. (I note there is actually a bank across the road in George still functioning as such!)


                      Further east along George Street, there is another Starbucks. Wow! A two-Starbuck Street!!


                      It is also a corner site, and here is the Hanover Street side, with interesting architectural details. Not just the original 18th century building apparent from the upper storeys, but a real 1960’s shop front with angled windows –from this viewpoint showing not the glass, but the intervening marble cladding with original artwork of copper figures.

                      That is something that I might have photographed previously for it’s architectural interest, although I actually hadn’t. It’s “purely pakarang”, this consultation of the phone directory, the listing of absolutely all the Starbucks branches in Edinburgh, the frantic dashing around the city to photograph them all. Only one proved elusive, an address in a recently redeveloped area near the modern conference centre. I prowled about these glitzy offices, hotels, bars and paved piazzas for a while. There were indeed some vacant premises though whether any had been a Starbucks in a previous existence remains inconclusive as it was difficult to even ascertain the street numbering with any degree of certainty. I stopped short of simply phoning to check who might reply, and some last minute Googling came up with conflicting map locations. So I still have a nagging doubt about a Starbucks having escaped me, but should the mystery ever be solved you will of course be informed immediately. And there could be new branches opening anywhere at anytime! I will need to remain attentive and constantly vigilant!

                      Comment


                        #26

                        Next to Edinburgh’s second city-centre railway station, Haymarket, is a Starbucks in what used to be a bar/bistro. This used to have some outdoor seating on a sort of ledge overlooking the railway line, and I rather enjoyed the drama of trains heard rumbling long before they dramatically emerged out of the tunnel from Princes Street gardens, though I appreciate this trainspotting might not have universal appeal. But I had no time to investigate if the terrace still exists, and hurried off to nearby Palmerston Place and another bank/office conversion.



                        Undoubtedly the most architecturally ornate Starbucks branch, there was clearly a problem in incorporating the usual signage in an appropriate and acceptable manner, and the familiar mermaid logo on a white plaque has a rather “stuck-on” appearance.



                        The only other indication is displayed on an inside window.

                        In contrast, there are the two Starbucks in large indoor shopping centres on the city outskirts.


                        The Gyle is on the western side . . .


                        . . . but to the east, Ocean Terminal in Leith will be more familiar to readers of these pages as one of my ship-spotting places. For this reason I am more likely to choose a cafe next to the windows or outside, with harbour view, when drinking coffee there.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          My next Starbucks-seeking expedition encompassed the area around part of the university and the Old Town:


                          55 Forest Road


                          140 Nicolson Street




                          . . . and in the Old Town itself at 118 Canongate . . .


                          . . . as well as at the corner of Hunter Square and the High Street, a popular location for tourists.

                          South of the centre there is now a Starbucks at 2 Colinton Road in a building that for years, certainly since I moved to Scotland in the 1970’s, had been a garden centre (a selection of plants were displayed in a yard to the rear of the premises). Locals refer to the area as Holy Corner as there is a church more or less on each corner of a crossroads.

                          Comment


                            #28


                            North of the city centre lies Stockbridge, a neighbourhood that like many in Edinburgh originated as a small separate village which later became incorporated in the expanding city.





                            A branch of Starbucks within a popular bookshop on Princes Street completes the collection. Located behind the curved window on an upper floor, it offers a fine view of the castle, and, at the moment, of the major road works for the construction of a tram line. It will be some time before I can take a photo of this store from a better position across the road.


                            This is probably the point at which to mention that Starbucks has considerable competition in the city, not only from numerous independent cafes but also from other brands, principally Costa Coffee. Indeed the bookshop seems to be hedging its bets by incorporating a Costa within its George Street branch, and it is Costa Coffee which is also encountered at the airport.



                            Here is a relatively recent Costa Coffee in the Bruntsfield area of Edinburgh, which I have never visited.
                            So I am going to include another brand with a more Italian orientation, Caffè Nero. Not that I am necessarily stating a brand preference, but rather an affection for one particular branch, the one located on Morningside Road. It happens to be situated on the axis of my domestic comings and goings, it is cosy and inviting, some comfy sofas near the door and outdoor seating in better weather, interesting and rather loyal clientele, and even a loyalty card which eventually earns you a free drink.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              But when I am too busy to linger in Neros I choose somewhere else to purchase a quick coffee-to-go. Now, if I am to explain this adequately it is going to seem as if I have suddenly veered hugely and dramatically off-topic. But hang in there. . . all will eventually become clear. . .

                              I don’t know if you are all familiar with the old British police boxes. These were kiosks incorporating a telephone that enabled police officers to contact their station in the days before mobile communications. The public could also use the phone to reach the police in an emergency. Inside, the boxes contained other equipment and served as a base for patrolling officers. But few survived after their main function was taken over by new technology. Generally the boxes were painted blue, and their design became something of an icon of street furniture. For some reason many linger on in Edinburgh, though in various stages of disrepair and decay, likely candidates for our Abandoned Houses and Properties thread.


                              There will for sure be another layer of stuck on flyers advertising Festival Fringe shows appearing here in the next few weeks.

                              But some of the boxes now have a new lease of life, having been delightfully transformed into . . .

                              . . . COFFEE SHOPS !!!!!



                              There is even one not too far away from Nero on Morningside Road!


                              Finally, we move from fact to fiction. For, since the early 1960’s, a police box has played a starring role in my favourite TV programme, the brilliant BBC Science fiction series Doctor Who, as the TARDIS (Time And Relative Dimensions In Space) – a time machine and spacecraft, curiously bigger on the inside than it appears on the outside.

                              So maybe I have at last discovered the answer to that longstanding mystery of CaptainsVoyage mythology, the missing CV transporter. Bigger on the inside so no problem fitting cabins for the whole crew, but then sent to Scotland for the coffee shop conversion especially to please our dear Captain. Unfortunately a minor malfunction left it stranded here on Edinburgh’s streets. . .

                              I wonder if I can find out which one it is . . . . .and get it working again?????????
                              Hurtibox - direct regular service on route Edinburgh – Trondheim

                              Last edited by Seagull; July 27th, 2009, 17:00.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Fantastic reading, fantastic writing... so enjoyable!

                                And some of your photographs are really, I mean really really nice as well!

                                Thank you for that thrilling story.... ummm... starting to miss the real thing again...
                                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X