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This is the Arctic

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    But I’ll end with an image I feel I can be proud of, one which speaks of my sense of place…I remember how I liked the other-worldliness of it when I took it…but then, a slip of hand-on-mouse in the post processing, and I am looking at this.



    I’d like to dedicate this image to pakarang, who inspires me to keep on taking photos.


    There remains one last section to this Greenland thread to finally complete what feels so much more than merely a “trip report”. It will be the excursion to the Greenland Ice Cap.

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      Re: This is the Arctic

      ...and I am REALLY happy that you are taking all these images... you have such a great talent behind your camera, and you always seem to take the pictures I either didn't see, or didn't dare take....

      Fantastic new installment is a big understatement!
      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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        Originally posted by pakarang View Post
        ....you always seem to take the pictures I either didn't see, or didn't dare take....
        Then that makes us complementary doesn’t it…such a team! And you’ve been so complimentary to me too…such encouragement.
        (How do people ever manage to learn English?! )

        Thank you pakarang.

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          Greenland #16 – Excursion to the Greenland Icecap

          Twelve years ago, a gravel road was constructed the 30 km or so from Kangerlussuaq to the edge of the Greenland ice cap…and that was only the beginning. For the road’s purpose was as an automobile testing ground for Volkswagen, and was constructed by Nausta to complement their site in northern Sweden. The road continued for 150 km on the inland ice sheet itself, the ultimate in severe testing conditions, cold, and near-zero friction. The cars were transported by air to Kangerlussuaq, which, due to its beginnings as a military airport, was able to handle the heavy transport aircraft.

          However the project was terminated and since 2006 only the gravel road to the edge of the ice sheet remains and is used for tourist excursions. It was such an excursion that was booked by Hurtigruten as a grand finale for the last day following the Fram voyage.

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            The participants had been divided into two excursion groups, and I was in group two who had free time in Kangerlussuaq (described in the previous section of this thread) prior to boarding the transport.

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              It is an exciting bumpy ride! A number of stops were made for short walks and photographs, different places on the return, but I will not show them in order for there is really only one way with which to finally end this thread which has taken me so long to complete – and that is on the ice cap itself!

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                I somehow managed to take this from the moving vehicle, sudden gusts of wind whipping up the dry silt dust of this polar desert.




                Also taken from the bus, to show a small kettle hole –a shallow round glacial lake. Beyond is a braided river, fed by glacier tongues from the ice sheet.

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                  There are places to see exposed bedrock too, and we stopped to walk beside this small waterfall.

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                      A spectacular view at a glaciers edge…

                      ….fresh ice falls.

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                        Large boulders, carried by ice.

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                          We reach the end of the road.

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                            The walk to the ice sheet. Looking at this photograph dated September 2009 is a reminder that this is a constantly shifting landscape which may already have changed almost beyond recognition –for that narrow “path” we took didn’t look like it would survive for long.

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                              We all made it along the marked trail to that hill of moraine in the last photo, and from there looked down onto the ice cap itself! For a while – and it was not simply to rest from the walking – everyone just stood and gazed in silence and contemplation. I will never forget that time, that awe, that silence.



                              After a while, a few people started to scramble down the slope. You can see that a couple of makeshift bridges span the stream and onto the grey silt-laden ice.

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                                And so I am standing on the ice, looking back to where others are following.


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