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    #16
    Absolutely stunning images! An absolute thrill to go to the Arctic with you!
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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      #17
      Greenland #2 – Qeqertarsuaq



      The Polar Cirkel boats bring us the short distance from Fram to an easy step ashore at a wooden pier. We have arrived in the town of Qeqertarsuaq, located on the south of an island of the same name, but which is perhaps better known as Disko Island. The old Danish name for the town was Godhavn.
      The whalebone arch is a reminder of the origins of the town as an anchorage for whalers in the 1770’s, though repercussions of the Napoleonic wars in Europe were to change that and today most people depend on fishing.






      A popular walk for tourists is to Blæsedalen – the Valley of the Winds – but I joined the “hard hiking group” who headed some distance along the coast, the first time Fram’s expedition team had offered this alternative.

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        #18
        There could hardly have been better weather for such a hike. The landscape is not dissimilar to places in Scotland having a similar geology of basalt lavas. I could for a moment think I was back there on a geology field trip . . . but then out to sea an iceberg drifts by!





        The cooling of the lavas formed the distinctive columns of basalt in many places, around where we are sitting and in the cliffs below . . . . . .


        . . . and there is also much of botanical interest.




        Established by the University of Copenhagen in 1906, this attractive building on the outskirts of the town houses an Arctic research station.
        I highly recommend a look at their informative website, (and don’t miss the movie of the view from here taken daily throughout the 2005-06 season!)

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          #19
          ....and again such a fantastic report, which carries me away from the grey rainy sky here in Stuttgart, where i have the light on in my office for the whole day now! This is very unusual down here in the South!

          And what a nice project 365. Which variety of water colors... and what a long winter. Brrrrr!
          Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

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            #20
            Originally posted by Seagull View Post
            Greenland is becoming more and more of a dream for me, through these images. I love the nature, the landscapes and scenery. The brightly colored houses and all the millions of subjects that basically begs to be photographed.

            I looked through the post once again, and I started wondering about the above boat. From another recent thread where I visited the Nature and Science Museum in Trondheim, I saw models of these boats where a wooden frame was used as the ribs, and seal skin (?) stretched over to make the hull... please correct me if I'm wrong or fill in the gaps.

            What I'm now wondering about is how do they "glue" the pieces together and with what?
            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

            Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

            Comment


              #21
              I found out a bit about the old methods of kayak construction in the old days. The traditional kayaks were based on a frame made from driftwood, usually tied together with seal sinew, although whale baleen could also be used. Then the frame was covered with seal skin, which could be sewn with sinew. This was done with a watertight method of stitching in which the needle would go through just half the thickness of the skin for each stitch, and there would be no obvious stitching on the outside. The skin was then stretched over the frame when wet, and would harden as it dried. Several coats of blubber were then applied to fill any holes that might remain in the seams, and this also served to preserve the skin.

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                #22
                Originally posted by Seagull View Post
                I found out a bit about the old methods of kayak construction in the old days. The traditional kayaks were based on a frame made from driftwood, usually tied together with seal sinew, although whale baleen could also be used. Then the frame was covered with seal skin, which could be sewn with sinew. This was done with a watertight method of stitching in which the needle would go through just half the thickness of the skin for each stitch, and there would be no obvious stitching on the outside. The skin was then stretched over the frame when wet, and would harden as it dried. Several coats of blubber were then applied to fill any holes that might remain in the seams, and this also served to preserve the skin.
                Fascinating! This explains all my thoughts towards how they did it... They are so... how do you say when someone knows how to use the resources at hand. Crafty?

                You wouldn't happen to have a close up of such a stitch?
                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by pakarang View Post
                  Fascinating! This explains all my thoughts towards how they did it... They are so... how do you say when someone knows how to use the resources at hand. Crafty?
                  You wouldn't happen to have a close up of such a stitch?
                  No – it shouldn’t be visible in the completed kayak, and the old technique was just something that was described to me. Modern materials are used nowadays. Thinking about it again now, I can’t really be sure just how thick the sealskin for a kayak would have been. There were certainly examples of ordinary stitching of clothing in the museums I visited, including the tuilik – a hooded jacket that was worn in the kayak and fastened to it, so as to enable rolling and keeping dry if capsized.

                  I don’t have photos of such details from the museums – so much to see in the time available, and so much of it new to me. Wonderful experiences . . .

                  I’m actually not sure of a single English word to describe this idea of knowing how to use the resources at hand! It’s more than simply resourceful when talking of survival in remote and challenging conditions. I wouldn’t tend to use “crafty” myself, as in the part of England where I was brought up, “crafty” was used to describe a rather sly or underhand person with a skill which is not always put to entirely proper use!

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                    #24
                    Following the hike along the coast, the group returned to the town and dispersed to explore the town independently. I sat for a while watching a small boy kicking a football around – perhaps you met him in the Greenlanders thread –here I’d now like to show you the houses where Greenlanders are living in Qeqertarsuaq.







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                      #25

                      An especially colourful row of houses caught my eye . . .


                      . . . as did this red house with attached greenhouse.

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                        #26
                        Those houses are fantastically..... (cute)... or in line with CV standard: "pretty"....
                        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          [quote=seagull;21360]
                          Originally posted by Seagull View Post

                          An especially colourful row of houses caught my eye . . .
                          love these!!!!!

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by ehp View Post
                            love these!!!!!
                            I’m starting today with a laugh . . . because I just knew you’d pick that photo. But then it was taken for you at the time, specially. Looks like we’d be next-door-but-one neighbours if we moved in here E! . . . now I wonder who we’d get in “lilac”???

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                              #29
                              Alix is the queen of all Things Purple...so I guess it would go to her!

                              I'm going out on a limb here, and making a SWAG (scientific wild a$$ guess) --the brightly painted houses are for a little relief from all the snow???

                              Comment


                                #30
                                It is amazing how a land so cold, rocky and with little plant life can be so beautiful. But, looking at the colorful houses I guess it shows that people will be creative wherever they are and make things the best they can.

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