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      Some other views from the area.

      The viaduc of Calix part of the outer ring road.







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        Now there's an opportunity for a sculptor of modern art, Yves - to represent that area's past with his/her interpretation of the cranes which were so much part of it. Sited on the river bank it could be impressive. I do like the wall painting of them above the street sign.
        Completely different is the scene in #152.2, beautifully framed. Unlike the old, rusting machinery there is a feeling of something everlasting, unchanging, even though we know the trees will grow, flourish, decay, the water flow unceasingly onwards and the wooden whatever-it-is eventually rot and collapse beneath the surface! But it's a satisfying view, isn't it?
        Ivy

        "To thine own self be true.......
        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

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        • yvneac
          yvneac commented
          Editing a comment
          Ivy I do like the way you interpret this images.

        I love the crane. It seems to me to have a anthropomorphic quality, and I can almost imagine him raising his legs and feet and clomping along like some science fiction robot! But an old aimiable robot! It will be rather a shame to say goodbye.

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        • yvneac
          yvneac commented
          Editing a comment
          Anthropomorphic!Absolutely Cecilia.I always imagine this crane coming up the hill to the dukedom abbay in the background....

        During the same bike-camera stroll I tried to pick-up the reflections of clouds on the canal.







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          Originally posted by yvneac View Post
          During the same bike-camera stroll I tried to pick-up the reflections of clouds on the canal.
          Yves, you have positively speared them on the end of those post (?) reflections.
          Ivy

          "To thine own self be true.......
          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

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            Really enjoyed these Yves - I agree with Cecilia, the crane looks like it's about to wake up and do something!!
            Cheers,

            Mark.

            www.pologlover.co.uk

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              Is there no conservation authority who is able to preserve the crane as monument?
              Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

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              • yvneac
                yvneac commented
                Editing a comment
                Don't know.It would be easier in a city with a great maritim and industrial tradition like Cherbourg or Le Havre.
                But anyway I have already send a mail to the mayor,a former collegue.
                Wait and see.

              Thougha lot of cities have dormer windows Caen keeps one of the richest collections of it in Normandy in spite of the bombing destructions in 1944.
              This tradition goes back to the Renaissance when the well-off merchants introduced the Italian style,using the workable local limestone.













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                      Purely as an abstract image I do so like that photo at #159.5 The balance of shapes and colours is just perfect, the geometry satisfying. And getting down to detail, (I apologised once for being a detail freak, but then Mark told me off, said I shouldn't apologise, so I won't!) I love the little diamond patch of rather fancy fish-scale slates above the dormer in #161.2 Also I wonder what was affixed to where the small holes are just above the lower window in #159.2 ? Some kind of transom, perhaps? Maybe whatever it was crumbled away, limestone doesn't weather all that well, does it?
                      I often wonder when I see a date inscribed on a building, as in #159.1, whether it was put there at the time of erection or at some later date. If the former then I would have thought the builder would have added his name as well - a mark of pride in his achievement, perhaps. Otherwise, why bother? But if inserted later by an owner delighted to live in a house of great age then that makes sense.
                      Ivy

                      "To thine own self be true.......
                      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                      Comment


                        What a splendid collection of dormer windows, for as a set it is marvellous to see this distinctive feature adapted to a whole range of building from the humble to the very grand.
                        So many architectural details and delights, though I must say I was particularly drawn to the exotic scene on the curved pediment in #160/1 - is it merely fanciful decoration, or illustrating a particular story or is there there any specific connection to the building and its history, Yves?

                        Ivy mentioned crumbling easily weathered limestone, evident in many of these photos. I wonder if any of the old local quarries can still be seen, or even if any are still worked? It is interesting to bear in mind that 'limestone' varies very greatly in its characteristics even within quite a local area - or sometimes even from different strata within a single quarry! It is not surprising that better and more expensive stone was more frequently used in grander buildings for wealthier clients. There are various kinds of 'better' however! Hard wearing and structurally sound in a building context is obvious enough. But softer stone is easier to carve for decoration, and even essential for the most intricate detailed designs. The best stone of all for this would be one that is relatively soft when freshly quarried but which, when exposed, weathers chemically to produce a harder more resistant surface layer.

                        Weathering resulting in differing discolouration and deterioration, even in the same kind of stone, can be influenced by such things as variation in evaporation rates between sunny and shady aspects, and rainwater drainage patterns.

                        Altogether so many reasons why these latest additions to this always interesting thread will keep me happy for hours!

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                          Cecilia and Ivy.

                          During a visit I did with a local historian friend of mine, I learned we have very few documents about the old houses of Caen because the Record Office burned in 1944.
                          About #160/1,you see the Hotel (mansion) de Than, achieved in 1527, in Italian style on a gothic structure. The decoration is typical of this time but the interpretation is not easy. We just can say that Saint Michel is very popular in Normandy (don’t forget the Mont), so the bas relief of dragon is not a surprise even though it’s only a possibility. In another hand, Thomas Morel the owner lord of the Hotel had the reputation to be interested in alchemy, so the reference to the fire could be a clue.
                          Anyway in the beginning of 1900 the hotel was a well-known restaurant in which Georges Simenon appreciated the scallops with cream and calvados sauce. Caen was a location for several novels and he spent a long time in the harbor with his boat L’Ostrogoth.
                          In 1944 a part of the building was destroyed but this aisle is still standing and on the national list of Historic Monuments.
                          Caen limestone.
                          I am not a specialist, all I know is it is a Jurassic one, thin and fine grained.
                          The production started in the11th century, so most of historical edifices in Caen are made of it and the quarries are still in production, mainly for restoring works. After the WWII the local authorities refused to use concrete to rebuilt the city and choose limestone, that was a real challenge.
                          NB: During Norman times, this stone was used in England to erect the Tower of London as well as Canterbury and Durham cathedrals.

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