Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

about Caen-Normandy

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts









    Comment


      Another artwork by David Nash,outside



      Cabins by Patrick Dougherty




      Inflatable structure by Klaus Pinter in the former riding school

      Comment


        Oh Yves, I am so behind with this thread. The whole of it is charming but this last selection of photos has my eyes getting bigger and bigger with delight.
        Must come back, but it won't be till tomorrow, then I shall have a feast, and there will be more to see as well, no doubt.
        Ivy

        "To thine own self be true.......
        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

        Comment


          oh those cabins have me drooling Yves, and your photography of them in that soft light with the touch of sunlight gently kissing the "roofs" !

          Comment


            The sculptures in post 137 are ingenuously beautiful in my eyes - particularly the inflatable one.
            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

            Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

            Comment


              Thank you all for your kind comments.
              And as a conclusion:

              Comment


                So much to enjoy in this thread, but since my earlier comments I'm afraid that I start by not liking something, and that is the coloured ball installation in front of the St. Pierre de Vartengeville Castle. Yes, the building is the home of a contemporary arts centre, but it is one of those modern pieces of art that are in juxtaposition with something older but yet neither relate nor make a satisfying contrast to it. I find myself asking - why coloured balls?
                However, the "maelstrom", as Jan-Olav aptly described it, is very powerful - maybe I would like to see that in front of the previous castle, both are strong structures, the maelstrom is, like the castle, made of rectangular blocks of material but in contrast lies horizontal against the rise of the building. I like the way the innermost wooden blocks are blackened (charred?) emphasising the heart of the structure.
                Jumièges Abbey is magnificent, isn't it? And that transept wall soaring to level with the twin towers at the west end, but not having the support that they have, it's amazing. But then comes another installation. The connection? Well, Yves, you said that the Vikings destroyed the first building, but a dakkar is a sad link and I don't see it as very innovative, I'm afraid, nor particularly attractive. (Aren't I a misery? )
                But then, joy, your favourite of the gardens. #130-133. They are so delightful. "Technicolour" language on the plaques but it is a place I'd love to explore and experience. I can feel how it would be to sit in the cocoon with absolutely no-one around just sensing the colours and smells of the flowers and foliage and listening for the little sounds. Did you try the sniff phones, Yves?
                The David Nash pieces are interesting, yet I'm always a little wary about sculptures composed of found objects. There is such a piece in the window of a local shop, it is a piece of sawn-off tree trunk, cut at an angle to reveal the interesting markings but no other work done on it that I can see, apart from a piece of hempen rope looped loosely across the top. Price about £130, (€€153) I think it was. But, like Cecilia, I love those cabins (wouldn't mind one in my garden), and the Klaus Plinter inflated sculpture.
                Many thanks, Yves, for this further glimpse into your city and the surrounding area. I look forward to more.
                Ivy

                "To thine own self be true.......
                Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                Comment


                  A beautiful selection of photos Yves - have really enjoyed walking around the garden with you!
                  Cheers,

                  Mark.

                  www.pologlover.co.uk

                  Comment


                    I agree with you Ivy when you write that the colored balloons are not at the right place in front of the castle. I don’t know what the artist’s mind was when he imagined his creation but as a result, the breaking of aesthetic codes doesn’t work. In a way it’s what I like in contemporary arts, you have not the historic distance to create or to criticize so you are always at the frontier between relevance and error. I use to say that this kind of art can’t be analyzed without a reference to the notion of risk, for the artist as well as for the spectator.
                    As for the “drakkars” in Jumièges since the abbey was destroyed by Vikings but rebuilt and enriched by their descendants, one of the boats is a symbol of danger and the other, inverted, appears as a shelter. It makes sense even though the plastic result is questionable.
                    I n Chaumont, like you, I have particularly enjoyed the cocoon and YES, I tried the sniff phones. And you know what? It really smelt!
                    On another hand, about the market, prices are often nonsense!!!

                    Comment


                      Usually Cabourg is crowded during week-end but in January its streets are empty.
                      Last Saturday even if it was a bit chilly, the sky was blue and clear.
                      A perfect weather for a little stroll along the beach on the mail Marcel Proust.











                      Comment


                        Nice wandering on the beach scenes, and Mansard roofs with those extra flourishes! - and I do so like how the "canopy"” seems to make the seat more of a cosy place to sit (though no less draughty!).
                        Last edited by Seagull; January 13th, 2014, 13:17. Reason: ...typo!

                        Comment


                          Beautifully serene images, Yves, in those first three. I can feel the freshness of the air and the resilience yet softness of the sand beneath my feet. In the fourth one I just want to throw those shutters open wide to join with the sun!
                          I'm curious about that fifth picture - I love the red colouring on the underside of the eaves overhang, but is it a relatively modern house? I ask because the timbers appear to be just batttened onto the walls, not part of the weight-bearing structure, and - dare I say it, are the window frames and dividers PVC? They are too perfect. . But is is attractive, anyway.
                          Ivy

                          "To thine own self be true.......
                          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                          Comment


                            You ask good questions Ivy,I did'nt asked myself before.
                            Most of houses in the city center of Cabourg were built at the end of the19th century in the eclectic balnéaire style.Before it was a sandhill area.
                            That firth house is an hotel nowadays,highly altered and I think you're right when you notice that the windows are made of PVC.
                            For information the twin town of Cabourg in UK is Salcombe,Devon.

                            Comment


                              It's a pity, but Bunga.y seems to have no European twin town, though we have one in Japan. At least we did have, though I've not heard of any exchange visits the last few years. Beccles, about 10 Km. east of Bunga.y, pairs up with Petit Couronne, while Halesworth, about 10 Km. SSE of Bunga.y is twinned with Bouchain, as well as Eitorf in Germany. Our High School has had some connections with Bouchain recently, though, see http://www.halesworthtowncouncil.org...20Exchange.pdf
                              Ivy

                              "To thine own self be true.......
                              Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                              Comment


                                This mornig I took my bike and went to the quays near the canal.
                                This district was busy until the 1960’s when Caen had still a metallurgical industry,and then became a sort of wasteland.
                                For the ten next years it will be a big playing field for architects (and the mayor) with the creation of a new neighbourhood.
                                The Fine Arts school is already built as well as the Cargö, an auditorium dedicated to the contemporary musics; the new Court House and the departemental Library are at the stage of their foundations.
                                In the long run this area will be a second city center towards the sea.
                                It was time to take pictures of the old cranes before they desappear!


                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X