Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

D-DAY 75th anniversary 6. June 2019

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    D-DAY 75th anniversary 6. June 2019

    Sunday 2. June, me and a long time buddy of mine, went to Paris where we rented a car to drive to Normandy.
    It has been a long time wish for us to visit there, and as the 75th anniversary came up, we used our savings and bought tickets with SAS (to please J-O ) and rented an apartment in an old house at the beach side in Saint-Aubin sur Mer. (This was via AirBandB, because there were no hotel rooms available in all Normandy).
    The return home to Norway was set for 9. June, but before that we visited Juno Beach (of course, since we lived by the eastern bart of that beach), we went to the Normandy Memorial Cemetery, Omaha Beach, Utah Beach, Saint-Mére-Église, Sword Beach, Pegasus bridge and museum, Batterie de Merville, Caen-Carpiquet Airport, the camp around the church in Sainte-Marie-du-Mont, the firld hospital and surgery HTB'44 in Hiesville and much, much more.
    I have so many pictures, but let me just make an own thread for the D-Day.

    Due to the visit from meny high rank people on the 6. June, among them the president of France and og course the POTUS, all main roads closed at 6:00 AM.
    One had to have a special sticker in the front wind shield of the car and most important, we had to decide where we wanted to spend the D-Day and we chose Arromanches and Gold Beach.

    To be at Gold Beach at 06:10 on the morning of 6. June was a very special feeling. The beach was filled with almost 300 different historical military vehicles, it took my breath away.
    IMGP2273 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    IMGP2272 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    IMGP2266 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    IMGP2264 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    IMGP2276 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    The fist soldier fell for enemy bullets at 07:26 AM 6. June 1944. At exactly 07:26 AM each 6. June, a lone bagpiper play a commemorative melody to pay respect
    IMGP2336 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    And by now, my eyes ran over with some salty stuff...
    IMGP2340 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr
    Last edited by Sterkoder; June 13th, 2019, 11:59.
    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

    #2
    IMGP2329 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    IMGP2323 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    IMGP2294 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    IMGP2372 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    IMGP2366 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    IMGP2358 2 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    IMGP2367 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    IMGP2362 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr
    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

    Comment


      #3
      Then of course, the Veterans
      Guards of honor made by a historic military group, the Somerset Regiment
      IMGP2483 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

      This guy stood just like this, without moving to honor the Veterans, for one hour and ten minutes!!! Respect! I watched as he was commanded out of it and into a rest position by his sergeant..., a moving moment.
      IMGP2473 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

      From a speach to those who gave their lives for our freedom: "They scarified their tomorrows so that we can live our today"
      IMGP2466 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

      Every Veteran was applauded thought the streets, when they came alone walking or in groups.
      IMGP2464 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

      The French resistance in a Citroen (FFI: Forces Francaises de L'Intérieur)
      IMGP2454 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

      IMGP2457 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

      A local girl in WW2 uniform
      IMGP2459 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

      IMGP2460 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr
      Last edited by Sterkoder; June 14th, 2019, 19:14.
      "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

      Comment


        #4
        Down to the beach again.
        There were 15 DUKW vehicles at Gold Beach at the time we were there
        IMGP2277 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

        IMGP2278 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

        Some had made their cars into mobile homes, and now it was time for bacon and eggs
        IMGP2287 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

        One guy in a jeep had his own PA-system and sang classic tunes from the 1940s
        IMGP2353 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

        IMGP2369 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

        IMGP2379 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

        IMGP2380 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

        IMGP2383 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr
        "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

        Comment


          #5
          All dressed up
          IMGP2385 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

          IMGP2391 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

          IMGP2394 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

          IMGP2395 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

          IMGP2398 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

          Chinooks from a RAF squadron
          IMGP2417 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

          IMGP2420 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

          This is a Swedish guy, coming to Normandy each 5 years to offer for sale his military effects
          IMGP2430 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr
          "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

          Comment


            #6
            We met more like these than civilians during our stay. To be honest, we walked around in uniforms ourselves...
            IMGP2436 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

            A Spitfire and C-47 (DC-3) passed over the ceremonies in Arromanches
            IMGP2516 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

            IMGP2524 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

            IMGP2526 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

            IMGP2528 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

            IMGP2522 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

            IMGP2520 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

            "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

            Comment


              #7
              On the hill above Arromanches, there is a 360 degrees movie theater, showing the invasion and all its horribles
              IMGP2439 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

              A few hundred meters east of that cinema, there was the Polish camp, as there were several Polish soldiers in the D-Day invasion
              IMGP2548 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

              IMGP2547 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

              The insignia of the Polish regiment
              IMGP2544 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

              IMGP2546 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

              IMGP2542 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

              IMGP2540 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

              IMGP2534 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr
              "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

              Comment


                #8
                This was not part of the Polish camp, but anyway
                IMGP2532 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

                And by these flags, I end my D-Day anniversary pictures posting. I have more from other places, but that have to wait.
                IMGP2555 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr
                "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                Comment


                  #9
                  Svein.
                  Envious? I'd love to have been there myself.
                  This must have been an unforgettable experience.
                  Řistein

                  If at first you don’t succeed, skydiving is not for you...

                  Comment


                  • Sterkoder
                    Sterkoder commented
                    Editing a comment
                    It was kind of what might be once in a lifetime experience.
                    Next big event will be at the 80th anniversary, but then all of the Veterans most likely will be passed away.
                    There were of course activities on all beaches, but we chose Arromanches and Gold Beach because there was the place to be for historic military vehicle enthusiasts.
                    I might go there again, but maybe not when a round year like 80 will be celebrated. Too crowdy.

                  #10
                  Very nice report from beaches I know very well.
                  You had the Opportunity to see a lot more than I do on these days. As I live downtown Caen, it was forbidden to use our car the 6th of June. So I just take my bike to reach Pegasus bridge which was very crowded and where I had a bagpipe concert.
                  Thank you for sharing.

                  Comment


                  • Sterkoder
                    Sterkoder commented
                    Editing a comment
                    The sharing of pictures are my pleasure. I have a lot more, from all the other places.
                    We rented a car and went to the Saint-Aubin-sur-Mer city hall to obtain that special sticker for the wind shield.
                    We were told that the sticker was mandatory for vehicles going in and out of Calvados on the 6th, but if you produced evidence for living there, you did not need that sticker for driving inside Calvados.
                    Anyway, we decided to go to Arromanches on the 6th and woke up at just after 4:00 AM to be able to have breakfast and manage to go there before the main roads closed at 6:00 AM.
                    From 2. June to 9. June we were up very early and late to bed, so even now, I'm tired and feel some kind of fatigue after a busy week in Normandy.
                    That said; if you are interested in military history (and photography), a week will be too short..., belive me.

                  #11
                  In the summer of 1946 I was standing on that beach at Arromanches which your photos portray, Svein, aged 14, and staring at the remains of Mulberry Harbour. My school had organised a visit to Normandy for just one or two classes and we stayed at a convent in Bayeux. Yves once very kindly found a photo for me of a Bayeux convent and although it was probably the one, I could not recognise it from the front elevation view - chattering schoolgirls would certainly not have been allowed to use the front door in their comings and goings! Morning classes in French conversation, taken out in the garden, were followed by various afternoon trips and one of those trips was to Port-en-Bessin and Arromanches. Memories of the former have long since faded and of Arromanches images of the actual town have also disappeared, but that flat beach, the tall cliffs behind and the massive chunks of the artificial harbour remain as vivid as if it were only a few weeks ago. Your photos reinforce my memories. Thank you.
                  At the time this momentous operation was taking place we in London were crouching under the steadily approaching engine-beats of the doodlebugs which filled our days and the massive explosions of the V 2's which followed later, so even though once D-Day was well under way it was splashed across the headlines, I don't remember knowing much about what was happening there across the Channel.
                  But, war ended, I would gradually have caught up with it all. That is why my Arromanches beach recall is so vivid, for there I was in 1946, staring at where part of it took place at Gold Beach and trying to fit it in with what I had experienced at home in London at that time.
                  Thank you again, Svein.


                  Ivy

                  "To thine own self be true.......
                  Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                  Comment


                    #12
                    While this type of perhaps isn't quite my cup of tea, the pictures still are just fantastic! They have just so much in them, thank you for taking the time to show us!

                    Comment


                      #13
                      There is probably many words to describe being there, but this report from the ceremonies are spectacular.

                      This appears to me now, much bigger than I initially imagined myself. It must have been such a spectacular event for you especially.

                      I wonder how many hundred images you came home with(?).

                      Some of the shots you have shared above really hits home on a central nerve. You have managed to capture so many extraordinary and historical images during your visit. It's really superb, Sterkoder!

                      Thank you so very much for sharing.
                      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X