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  • This is Hong Kong

    One more place that does not have it's own thread here is Hong Kong. To correct that I'll start one here with a few pics from HK the last few day.

    The Hong Kong Island skyline as seen from the HK Convention Centre:


    Kowloon skyline as seen from the same site:

    If it looks a little hazy, that is Hong Kong, most days.

  • #2
    High Rise buildings are the standard of Hong Kong, but here is one that has taken it to the extreme between height and base area:


    A very special shaped Condo up in the hills on HK Island:

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    • #3
      But some few things is still the same as I remember from my visits in HK in the early 1960s and working here in 1972. The Clock tower at Star Ferries, Kowloon side:


      Like the streets off Nathan Road in Kowloon:


      Or the Shopping Streets in Mongkok:


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      • #4
        HK doesn't have a street like Orchard Road in Singapore to decorate. Therefore whole buildings are decorated:


        More to follow at a later date and in other threads.

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        • #5
          Star Ferries - Hong Kong

          There is one institution that has become a symbol of Hong Kong, Star Ferry.
          These ferries crosses Victoria Harbour from Kowloon to Hong Kong Island as they have always done. No matter how many tunnels there are under the habour, this is a popular means of transport.

          Here is one ferry approaching Wan Chai Ferry Pier:


          Mooring at the pier:


          Another Star Ferry on the opposite tack:






          Two ferries meeting:


          There are one change though, some ferries have been given a new livery:
          Last edited by ombugge; December 27th, 2010, 11:30. Reason: Changing oprer of pics

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          • #6
            An internal view from a Star Ferry:


            One interesting detail; since the ferries are "double ended" the seat backs are 'turnable". I.e. the passenger always face in the direction of travel.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ombugge View Post
              One interesting detail; since the ferries are "double ended" the seat backs are 'turnable". I.e. the passenger always face in the direction of travel.
              Brings back a lot of memories.... I have traveled with these ferries once upon a time, and what I do remember is the reversible seat backs. How funny is that.

              Hong Kong has changed since my visit though... a lot. I do recall that I visited Nathan Road and bought a film camera (I think it was...)...
              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
              Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
              Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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              • #8
                Hong Kong Tram

                Here is another Hong Kong institution; the double decker trams that is still running the route from Kennedy Town to Happy Valley, through Central, Wan Chai and Causeway Bay. This is not just a tourist attraction but a very much used means of transport on Hong Kong Island.
                And it is cheap!! The fare is HKD 2 (USD 0.25) for adults, HKD 1 for Children and Senior Citizens, regardless of length of travel.

                Approaching a Tram stop in Central:


                Front views: (Taken from the upper deck of another tram)




                Two trams close together, waiting at a traffic light in Wan Chai:


                Here is a side view of a tram at speed:


                The tram line is a nuisance to other traffic, but a much loved institution that cannot be touched.

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                • #9
                  This is a unique idea, especially if you have visited a lot of tramway museums and learned, that it everywhere was a big technical task to enlargen the trains to rise up the capacity. In Hongkong they doubled the capacity and can use the old, cheap and curves-able two axis carriage. Genious. Although you have to change the complete overhead wiring...
                  Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ralf__ View Post
                    This is a unique idea, especially if you have visited a lot of tramway museums and learned, that it everywhere was a big technical task to enlargen the trains to rise up the capacity. In Hongkong they doubled the capacity and can use the old, cheap and curves-able two axis carriage. Genius. Although you have to change the complete overhead wiring...
                    Not a very new idea, the trams have been double deckers for as long as I have visited Hong Kong, which is 50 years.
                    In fact, here is the history of the Hong Kong Tramway: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hong_Kong_Tramways.
                    All you ever wanted to know is there.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      …and naturally Blackpool (which had double-deckers from the start, originally conduit system, changed to overhead line in 1898) is mentioned in the first paragraph!
                      (As a child I knew I could always persuade my Dad to wait for a double-decker to arrive so we could sit upstairs, preferably a front seat, although he was considerably less enthusiastic about the open topped ones!)

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                      • #12
                        Hong Kong development

                        I have been visiting Hong Kong infrequently from 1960 onwards and seen the transformation from what was a colony with immense riches and poverty living side by side, not always in harmony. Corruption was the norm, not the exception.

                        My longest stay was approx 2 1/2 months, back in 1972, while taking delivery of a new built Landing Craft and trying to drum up some business for my employer at the time.
                        I had a desk in the Wallem office, which was in Sutherland House in Central. It can be seen in this picture from around that time:

                        Long gone and replaced with a taller building, like nearly every other building in that area at the time.
                        But HK Cricket Club and Government House, on the left and centre, is preserved.

                        This is a view of Hong Kong Island as seen from Star Ferry Pier, Kowloon at around that time:


                        And a more recent, but not current view from near the same place:


                        This from a different angle and shot two weeks ago:


                        This is a view towards Kowloon from Wan Chai:


                        A similar view today:


                        If we go further back, to 1960, this was the view from The Peak:

                        I don't have a current view from The Peak, since we did not venture up there this time, but it is fairly new, I believe:

                        (The above pictures taken from the web, except #4 and 6. Shot from a Star Ferry while crossing from Wan Chai to Kowloon)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hong Kong has changed dramatically over the years: I mean, really dramatically.
                          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                          Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                          Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                          Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                          Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                          Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Here is proof that not everything old in Hong Kong has been destroyed. Government House is still there:


                            So is Wan Chai Police Station:

                            Now a museum.

                            Connaught Drive is on reclaimed land anno 1970-72:

                            and in the opposite direction.


                            This is some of the "older" parts of Wan Chai, but with another sky scraper "growing" in the background:


                            The back of a building in Hollywood Road is not exactly an architectural beauty:

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                            • #15
                              Let us get out of the tourist area and have a look at where ordinary Honkies live.

                              This is the view of Sai Wan Ho, Hong Kong Island from the sea:

                              From Panoramio. Photographer; Baycrest

                              This is the view from a flat in the blocks seen int he background, left, in the picture above. (Low floor):





                              A Typhoon Shelter can be seen between the buildings

                              Here is a view of Sai Wan Ho at night from the same place:




                              That is it from Hong Kong for this time.

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