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  • #16
    Now for the delta and the activity there. Here is a few pics of typical villages along the river:






    Kutai, a bit bigger village with a Ferry Wharf and Prawn Packing Factories:

    From here the two main branches of the river, one flowing NE and one South, spread out to form the delta,

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    • #17
      The early oil fields were in this area:

      This field is abandoned, but there still some active well that is producing a few barrels per day each.

      But there is also present activity. This is a pipeline crossing at Sanga Sanga, near Kutai:


      This is Central Processing Unit (CPU), the main Gas Processing Plant in the upper reaches of the Delta:


      The Helipad at CPU:


      The Processing Plant itself is placed on piles, just like an offshore platform:

      I was involved in placing a module of approx. 4,500 m.t. by the "float-over method" at CPU, which is not a small feat, bearing in mind that it had to be towed up the river and placed with strong current running.

      The main camp at CPU was comfortable and well equipped:


      Here is the Boat Landing for those arriving by Speed Boat or Sea Truck:

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      • #18
        The type of Speed Boats used to get around in the delta, able to carry 6 pax:


        Here is a typical Sea Truck, capable of carrying 12 pax and some freight:

        At the time Total had something like 200 of these boats on hire

        Sometime tings didn't go entirely to plan:

        My Speed Boat run out of fuel and we had to get a tow from a Sea Truck that came along.

        Much of the work around the Gas Fields were done with various barges and tugs:






        Flotsam could be a problem at times:


        Much of the transportation was by Landing Crafts like this:

        Built, owned and operated by local companies in Samarinda.

        Then there were a number of special barges to maintain the wells and Gas Gathering Stations spread throughout the delta.
        Here is Well Stimulation Barge:


        Well, that is all for now. I'll post some pictures of the other main activity in the Mahakam Delta, prawn farming later.

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        • #19
          Very interesting photos. I can hardly wait until we visit the prawn farm.

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          • #20
            Excellent. I found it so very interesting to see this kind of operation taking place in the delta environment –rather different surroundings than those we are more generally familiar with.

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            • #21
              Enjoyed that, more please.
              Of the first photo in #17 you said "This field is abandoned, but there still some active well that is producing a few barrels per day each." So who operates it, some local syndicate who then sells what there is for use in the immediate area? But, though I know nothing about oil production, wouldn't it need processing/refining in some way?
              Ivy

              "To thine own self be true.......
              Thou canst not then be false to any man."

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              • #22
                Originally posted by wherrygirl View Post
                Enjoyed that, more please.
                Of the first photo in #17 you said "This field is abandoned, but there still some active well that is producing a few barrels per day each." So who operates it, some local syndicate who then sells what there is for use in the immediate area? But, though I know nothing about oil production, wouldn't it need processing/refining in some way?
                I should have been more precise. It should have read; This field is abandoned, but there is still some active well in the area that is producing a few barrels per day each."
                You are right, Crude Oil directly from the well is not of much direct use, it has to be refined into it's various components before it goes to market.
                The old well are operated by smaller operators and sold on to Pertamina for refining at their refinery in Balikpapan.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by ombugge View Post
                  I should have been more precise. It should have read; This field is abandoned, but there is still some active well in the area that is producing a few barrels per day each."
                  You are right, Crude Oil directly from the well is not of much direct use, it has to be refined into it's various components before it goes to market.
                  The old well are operated by smaller operators and sold on to Pertamina for refining at their refinery in Balikpapan.
                  No, Ombugge, I understood what you were saying, it was I who incorrectly said "who operates it", as if there were only one well. So obviously it is still worth operating on a very small scale as they are doing. Thanks for your prompt reply.
                  Ivy

                  "To thine own self be true.......
                  Thou canst not then be false to any man."

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                  • #24
                    Foto lebih dari Indonesia silahkan..... (more photos from Indonesia please )....
                    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

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                    • #25
                      Mahakam Delta Prawn Farms

                      Sorry, I have been too preoccupied with other thing, like work and travel to Norway, to post any pictures from Indonesia lately.

                      As promised, some pictures from one of the most primitive type of Prawn Farms there are:
                      Arriving at the boat landing by Speedboat:


                      They just clear a bit of Nipa-Nipa and undergrowth, dig a few ditches and bunds by hand:

                      Make some primitive means of Flood Control:

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                      • #26
                        Prawns are territorial and cannibalistic so leaving hiding places helps in keeping the mortality down:


                        Build a simple dwelling and move in to watch your property:

                        Now all you have to do is wait for the next spring tide to flood the pond, close the "gate" and Bingo!!, you have a basic prawn pond.

                        There is of cause a small matter of catching seed prawns among the mangrove roots along the river banks to stock your pond. (I didn't find any good pictures of this process, but it is done with a very fine mesh net, from a dug-out canoe)

                        Since mortality is high and there is very little feeding done, the yield is low, but it is quite profitable and a VERY low cost operation.

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                        • #27
                          Down by the coast, south of the delta, near Senipa, there are a number of more sophisticated Prawn Farms, with somewhat higher yield, but also with more expenses:


                          These ponds are dug deeper and cleared of most debris:

                          And they actually feed the prawns to reduce cannibalism.

                          After three harvests the pond is drained to let the sun dry and clean the dirt and kill bacterias:


                          There are a lot of modern Prawns Farms in Indonesia, where they use aerators, some even with PVC-lined ponds, mostly on Java and some places on Sumatra.

                          Even the more sophisticated ponds used to be dug by manpower only. I asked one time, when visiting a top modern Prawn Farm in Java back in 1990, why they didn't use bulldozers or backhoes, which would be much faster and easier?
                          The answer was that there are a lot of cheap labour and the "Javanese bulldozers works on rice".
                          In other words, more people got some to work and the cost was even lower then using modern machinery. That still holds true in some part on Indonesia, but not necessarily in places like Balikpapan, or even on Java these days.

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                          • #28
                            Sorry, I have been too preoccupied with other thing, like work and travel to Norway, to post any pictures from Indonesia lately.
                            Work.....? travel..... ? not a good enough excuse.
                            Glad we're on to the long-promised prawn farms. Those two pictures at #16 are so very atmospheric, they contain a whole world for that particular individual, don't they? I see from Googling that prawns seem to be generally omniverous but I never knew that they were cannibalistic. And my inevitable question, Ombugge - what feed is used in the larger farms?
                            Now please don't let any more trivial pursuits get in the way of more pics.
                            Ivy

                            "To thine own self be true.......
                            Thou canst not then be false to any man."

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                            • #29
                              I suppose I wouldn't be receiving many thanks for quick reply on this one, but here goes.

                              As you say, prawn farms and the rivers are the world for people living in the lower Mahakam Delta, although many has gone into the Oil and Gas industry and advanced quite high in that field. The ones that run these primitive ponds are obviously not among those.

                              You are also right that Prawns in general are omnivorous, although there may be variety between the many species of Prawns.
                              The ones farmed here are definitely omnivorous and territorial and thus need hiding places to protect them from their neighbours.
                              The saying goes that if you put a thousand seed prawns in a slick tank and don't add any food, you will eventually end up with one very big prawn.

                              In these primitive ponds there are not much feeding going on, only what nature brings, whatever that may be from the soil and with the flood water.
                              Hence the high mortality rate, even though there are ample hiding places.

                              I don't have any pictures at hand, but it is quite common to see a "out house" built on stilts into the ponds. Nothing goes to waste in rural Indonesia.

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                              • #30
                                Ambon, Moluccas, Indonesia

                                I have recently revisited two places in East Indonesia I haven't been to for nearly 40 years, Ambon in the Moluccas Province and Fak Fak in West Papua Province.
                                I spent 1 1/2 year trading in this area in my younger days, but have only occasionally been back since 1972. And than mainly to Sorong and Bintunu in West Paupa.

                                I have been posting widely in other threads about these two places, mainly in Ports of the World, but also in the Airports of the World and the Plane Spotter thread and even in the Hotel Room view thread.

                                Not too much to add, but I find it appropriate to post a few pictures here as well. Some may even be duplicated.

                                First to Ambon, which is the capital of the Moluccas Province, Indonesia and a centre for fishery and much of the trade in the region.

                                This is take from the aircraft window when approaching Ambon in the early morning:

                                Note the very large church in the relatively small village (Kampung)
                                In the next village there was an equally large Mosque but, due to turbulence on approach, my picture of that was too blurred to post here. In any case, that tell something of the recent history of this place.

                                A view of the town itself, with the port area prominently visible:

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