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A Small Suffolk Town

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    #31
    The "strange thing" I mentioned in my photo above might be a little more obvious if I post a closer view of the third pair of windows from the left.


    P1190651
    by wherrygirl, on Flickr

    In the late 17th century the government introduced a window tax to raise money. Obviously unpopular, people took various measures to avoid paying it and for existing houses they simply removed the glass and boarded up the window or, in some cases took out the complete frame and bricked in the space. In many old properties you can still see this and the two windows in the middle of the photo above were carefully boarded up, but keeping the individual framework and painting the whole to give the appearance of a window.
    The windows of the near end of the house as in #29, upstairs and down, have at some time had the glass partially reinstated - just the top sash in each case. Makes me wonder why they didn't do the whole window!
    Ivy

    "To thine own self be true.......
    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

    Comment


    • yvneac
      yvneac commented
      Editing a comment
      The same window taxes applied in France,with the same results.Honfleur is good exemple.

    #32
    I went up the town last week with the intention of photographing the cherry blossom in the St. Mary's churchyard. And of course there were workman all over the place in Trinity Street with their cones and their tools and the truck and goodness knows what else.



    P1190718 by wherrygirl, on Flickr



    All of it in my way!
    I muttered to myself, but then smiled sweetly at the chappie in the bright yellow jacket because he had immediately signalled at his colleague further along to hold up the traffic while madam ambled gently along to where she could safely get out of their way. I decided to do some shopping and come back into the churchyard from the other end of the path.
    What they were doing was an improvement to the courtesy pedestrian crossing, to make it more visible to those drivers not familiar with the word. This crossing was one of the bright ideas thought up by the County Council as part of the town improvement scheme that was carried out early last year.
    There is parking all along one side of Trinity Street, and it was thought that by leaving a one-car-length space and laying a different kind of pavoir slanting across the road to the churchyard path that we all use, and also as it was in the new 20mph limit area (Ha! Ha!) then all would be well for the foot people. In practice we would timidly step on to the beginning of the pavoirs between two cars, peer cautiously to our right from where the traffic was belting towards us, and then step hastily back before the close shave that inevitably occurred nearly swept us off our feet. Finally, when the nearest car was still some way away, we (or at least I) would defiantly walk across in a calm, deliberate manner staring at the oncoming driver and daring him/her not to slow down.
    Someone must have said quite a few choice words to the Council over the past year - hence the workmen in their bright yellow jackets and the bright yellow tipper truck.


    P1190719 by wherrygirl, on Flickr



    Shopping completed, I approached the cherry tree from the town end of the churchyard path and wound my way amongst the tombstones trying first to get a distance shot, but it was awkward because there was always a cone or a workman or a car in the background. I did manage a couple and then went and immersed myself in the glory of the blossom. There are two trees, a pink-flowered one and this white one which I'll show in the next post. They are so beautiful, but their display is short lived at the best of times and with the very strong, bitter winds we have been suffering recently their brief glory has been cut even shorter.
    Two days later I went up again to see if the men were still there. They were, but the job was complete and, as I watched, the truck lowered its tipper, the men prepared to leave and so I took some more photos.


    P1190720 by wherrygirl, on Flickr



    Incidentally, another of the windows which I referred to in #31 is visible more or less centrally in the first photo of this post, just above the fifth cone from the left, and to the left of the downpipe.
    Last edited by wherrygirl; May 2nd, 2015, 23:01.
    Ivy

    "To thine own self be true.......
    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

    Comment


    • Tommi
      Tommi commented
      Editing a comment
      Nice to see. I get a feeling that this road work was staged by "Playmobil"

    • wherrygirl
      wherrygirl commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes, I had a set for my birthday.

    #33
    Behold the blossom!


    P1190703
    by wherrygirl, on Flickr


    P1190708
    by wherrygirl, on Flickr


    P1190700
    by wherrygirl, on Flickr
    Ivy

    "To thine own self be true.......
    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

    Comment


      #34
      I was intrigued by the twigs growing from low down on the trunk and, moreover, bearing blossom:


      P1190715
      by wherrygirl, on Flickr

      One last view taken from behind the truck:


      P1190705
      by wherrygirl, on Flickr
      Ivy

      "To thine own self be true.......
      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

      Comment


      • Tommi
        Tommi commented
        Editing a comment
        Wonderful bloom, there cannot possibly be more spring in the air!

      #35
      Thank you very much, Tommi.
      Ivy

      "To thine own self be true.......
      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

      Comment


        #36
        nice images Ivy.Always nice those trees full in bloom.
        best regards Thijs

        Comment


          #37
          Superb photos Ivy - irrepressible blossoming and exactly how I think of springtime in an English village.

          Comment


            #38
            Thank you, Cecilia. All we want is the temperature to go with it! Fortunately photos don't show that!
            Ivy

            "To thine own self be true.......
            Thou canst not then be false to any man."

            Comment


              #39
              Only just picked these up Ivy - they're beautiful. The blossom is magnificent at the moment - thank heavens for antihistamines!

              I know what you mean about the temperature - it's a bit better today, but we have too many showers to make life too pleasant, and the breeze is a nuisance. It's playing havoc with the baby blackbirds' flying lessons.
              Cheers,

              Mark.

              www.pologlover.co.uk

              Comment


                #40
                Thanks, Mark. it is just stunning, isn't it? Makes you want it to go on for weeks.
                And Thijs, thanks to you, too. I PM'd you about something else and mentioned it amongst other things, but then forgot to say anything here.
                Ivy

                "To thine own self be true.......
                Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                Comment


                • janihudi
                  janihudi commented
                  Editing a comment
                  it's okey.
                  i found it,nicely captured,almost a ''Thijs'' compocition.:-)

                • wherrygirl
                  wherrygirl commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Cheeky devil

                #41
                I can confirm that it was wonderful weather in UK recently. O.K. you will need scarf, beanie and gloves, while driving 150 miles in an open Midget, but it felt wonderful.
                Springtime is terrific.
                Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

                Comment


                • Ralf__
                  Ralf__ commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I have just to add that this is a marvellous thread, due to lack of time i could not read it in detail. But for sure i will as soon as possible. Thank you so far, Ivy!

                #42
                Ralf, I've a lot on my plate, as we say, at the moment and saw your comment only yesterday. But thank you very much. It is quite fun to do, actually, because it is not planned, just comes as the whim takes me - or something of interest happens.
                Ivy

                "To thine own self be true.......
                Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                Comment


                • yvneac
                  yvneac commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I like this expression "to have a lot on one's plate".In French we say "avoir du pain sur la planche"
                  Anyway I hope a whim will take you soon.

                • janihudi
                  janihudi commented
                  Editing a comment
                  ahh in that case,in holland it is;teveel hooi op mijn vork genomen

                #43
                That's not quite the same, though Thijs. "To have a lot on my plate" just means I have a lot to do, whereas your expression means that I have taken on too many things, I can't cope. Our expression for "teveel hooi op mijn vork genomen" is "I have bitten off more than I can chew"! (I understood your expression without my dictionary, but checked to make sure!)
                Ivy

                "To thine own self be true.......
                Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                Comment


                  #44
                  Back in the churchyard again. I'll try to have a different whim next time, Yves. But again it was the flowers that delighted me. The district council are responsible for mowing the grass in the two churchyards as well as on the triangular island opposite my house and this year they had left the churchyards very late. I can't remember ever seeing them looking so beautiful. Most showy were the buttercups, but there were also tall clumps of the delicate white hedge parsley and, at the other end of the scale, the little speedwell deep down at the roots of the buttercups.



                  P1190730
                  by Ivy, on Flickr


                  P1190738
                  by Ivy, on Flickr

                  Some of the buttercups had grown quite tall, showing well against the tombstones.


                  P1190736
                  by Ivy, on Flickr

                  I don't know whether the delay was because of pressure of work or because of the wonderful show of wild flowers. I doubt it was the latter, unless they were "got at" to hold off for a while. Some years back when I was helping to do a wild flower survey in the town for the Suffolk Wildlife Trust I found just one or two cowslips in the Trinity Churchyard. These have been comparatively rare until very recent times. A few days after I had found them the council decided to cut the growth down and I found a chappie with a strimmer periously close to the cowslips. I had a chat with him and asked him to leave the grass around the little plants and I would have a word with the council about them.
                  He probably thought "Crazy woman" but he seemed sympathetic and steered clear of the small yellow blooms. I chatted up someone at the district council offices and said that the blooms in the churchyard were on the rare plants list, weren't we lucky to find them in Bunga.y, etc., etc., and asked if the workmen could possibly be asked to watch out and not mow them down. I didn't hold out much hope but to my utter amazement the following spring, after the men had done their job, there were little islands of grass and a few small plants around the precious cowslips, which have been gradually spreading (complete with islands) over the years.
                  Last week I took the camera with me when going up to shop, intending to photograph some buttercups up close, as the couple of shots I had taken before were not good. And, yes, there were two motor mowers and a couple of strimmers all hard at wotk. Too late - heigh-ho.
                  They churned the ground up where they turned the mowers at the end of each run, and the grass has been left in clumps all over the place. What a mess! Do you remember the churchyard, Thijs, when we were all trying to photograph the butterflies on the buddleia bush?
                  The ruins are those of the ancient nunnery which used to be part of the site. I'll probably say something about that some time!
                  Ivy

                  "To thine own self be true.......
                  Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                  Comment


                    #45
                    Trinity Church, home of the cowslips. I'll probably say something about that church at some time, too.


                    Trinity Church
                    by Ivy, on Flickr
                    Ivy

                    "To thine own self be true.......
                    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                    Comment

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