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  • A Small Suffolk Town

    The meaning of the name Bunga.y has various interpretations, the usual one being that it is an Anglo-Saxon appellation meaning land owned by Bonna, a Saxon chief. It certainly has an excellent defensive position, being on raised land in a loop of the river Waveney and surrounded on three sides by marshy land. Much of the latter is in the adjoining county of Norfolk as the boundary line between the two counties lies along the river bed. A large part of the river’'s loop is occupied by our common, while the built-up part of the town sits in its neck.


    The town's armorial bearings

    P1190507 by wherrygirl, on Flickr


    The elements making up the bearings are especially relative to Bunga.y - the Black Dog, the Castle, the river Waveney and, of course, the Wherry. They will all make an appearance sooner or later, no doubt. And the little note tucked into the left side of the framed picture? That gives the translation of the Latin motto: Let us hold fast to the old virtues.

    Thijs suggested last year that with my knowledge of the town and its buildings I ought to do a thread about it. My response was that in fact I had already decided to do just that as I have many photos to show not only of what can be seen when walking about the area but also of the insides of some of the vernacular properties, photos that I took as part of the Bunga.y Society old buildings survey that I set up years ago. I am only now getting round to compiling the albums ready to put into our local museum for public reference. (My guilt feelings at the delay are almost overwhelming.)
    Some of those photos will appear in this thread, but it will not be all about buildings, anything might appear as the fancy takes me - so long as it concerns Bunga.y. And, as befits my home town, I’'m using the framing style as per my 366 thread. Well, it'’s special!
    Last edited by wherrygirl; March 21st, 2015, 20:12.
    Ivy

    "To thine own self be true.......
    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

  • #2
    Good idea Ivy.Un opportunity to discover a part of England where I never went.
    By the way I have to say that the name of your town surprises me.As you know I am not a great English speaker, so this toponym (Bunga-point-y) appears very unusual.Can you teach me?

    Comment


    • #3
      Oh Yves, the point is only to outwit the software's censor. Without that the censor objects to the last three letters "g a y" because as a proper word in English they have lost their original meaning of bright and cheerful and come to mean a hom.ose.xual person. You see, I have had to do something about that penultimate word in the previous sentence because when I checked with Preview the censor had cut out the first 7 letters. "Se.x I had expected to be cut out, but had forgotten that hom.o might also go.
      I wonder what the censor will make of **** sapiens. There, Preview shows that the first word (hom.o) is not allowed. Censor is not very sapiens, I'm afraid.
      So my method is to put a dot before the last letter of the "offensive" word to break it up, and then the censor is silenced. Thijs uses the number 9 instead of the "g" in my town's name and that is good as well: Bun9ay.
      If you ever consider posting a discourse in English on rearing chickens and want to refer to the male of the species your word will be replaced by 4 stars! Naughty, naughty, that word is slang for what the censor considers an unmentionable. You can't even say ****pit - where the pilot sits in a plane. See?
      But it is good fun thinking up evasion tactics!
      Ivy

      "To thine own self be true.......
      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

      Comment


      • yvneac
        yvneac commented
        Editing a comment
        Thank you for this explanation Ivy.
        I understand that censors are not very sapiens but they are great geographers and top linguists!

      • Tommi
        Tommi commented
        Editing a comment
        Sometimes it's more interesting to interpret the words that actually are not said or written.
        I'm happy that I dont live in Es*** and read ****ens...

        To be honest, this censor function is totally pointless, I don't think that any of the CVF people are writing these words anyhow, it only results in strange and funny sentences...

      • janihudi
        janihudi commented
        Editing a comment
        this issn't new ,when i signed in ,in 2009 it was already like this,i'm surprised that some of you are surprised about that sensor.

    • #4
      A view from an upstairs window on a soft, misty morning is of the gable end of the ex-maltings building, now converted to maisonettes and flats.

      P1090636 - C by wherrygirl, on Flickr


      Years ago East Anglia was described in school geography books as the granary of England, for its main crops were grains –- wheat, oats (normal and black) and barley, especially barley. The climate in this part of the country is drier than in most other areas and when rain falls it is often soon wicked away by the strong winds which are ever sweeping across the relatively level land. Good, lush grass for cattle is therefore not so easy to produce, but the fields are open to the wide sky which not only sheds the light on the landscape that painters love to capture, but also encourages the ears of corn to ripen. So grains thrive.
      Barley is, of course, vital for producing the malt for beer and maltings, or ex-maltings, are to be seen all over Norfolk and Suffolk. When I first came to live here the maltings in the photo were still in production. The grain was first steeped in water, then removed and stacked in a container where it began to germinate. At that point it was spread out on the floor which often stretched almost the length of the building and the temperature was carefully regulated to encourage the germination. It was then that the sweetish smell could be sensed on the air and which I remember well. Before the kernel had developed too far the heat was reduced and the grains left to dry out before finally being roasted in the kiln.
      The converted maltings as they are now

      P1190459 by wherrygirl, on Flickr


      That second gable from the left once had an overhanging extension with a hoist at which barley was delivered for processing and the resultant malt collected. Long after the business closed I used to park my car under the overhang in very bad winter weather to try and shelter it from heavy snowfalls.


      P1190460 by wherrygirl, on Flickr
      Last edited by wherrygirl; March 21st, 2015, 20:16.
      Ivy

      "To thine own self be true.......
      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

      Comment


      • #5
        I am trialling a few words to have a bit of fun with the censor.
        ****geneous
        ****nym
        ****centric
        ****eopath.....

        Comment


        • nari
          nari commented
          Editing a comment
          I shoulda known.....this is weird...

      • #6
        The strange thing is that the search results ain't censored:



        Comment


        • #7
          well well thats nice,now i wil finally see Bun9ay,the complete story.
          best regards Thijs

          Comment


          • #8
            Yes, I think that Nari and Tommi have finished their jolly little game of "Beat the Censor". Perhaps next time they will use one of their own threads to play on. The box labelled Reply is meant for remarks on the topic in that thread. Many of us, including myself, go OT on a thread sometimes, but only after we have been commenting on the thread's subject matter, which in this case is the town of Bunga.y. Yves raised a perfectly sensible query which I answered. That should have been the end of the matter.
            Ivy

            "To thine own self be true.......
            Thou canst not then be false to any man."

            Comment


            • #9
              now it's my time to say i know that place,i've been there.
              this thread wil bring back memories.
              best regards Thijs

              Comment


              • #10
                Opposite the front of the converted maltings is a small car-park for visitors. And just behind that is this pair of "gates":


                P1170579
                by wherrygirl, on Flickr

                I used inverted commas because the apparent gates are actually two half barriers, that is the only way that they can be described. The idea of the local Broads Authority was that they would provide a certain amount of privacy for the adjoining house but yet lead to a footpath usable by the general public, for once through them and following the path along the side of the house you come to the wherry cut on one side and the millstream on the other. Then further on is the river, with just nearby a little footbridge taking you over the millstream and along the path by the river back to the mill. It all makes a pleasant little round.


                P1170582
                by wherrygirl, on Flickr

                When the "gates" were first erected they were painted white, which looked odd and stood out against the red brick of the houses and the general greenery of the flowers and bushes. They were eventually replaced by others which have thankfully been left in their natural state.
                The good thing is that it all looks very private, and it is mostly only dog walkers and locals who know that it is a public footpath!


                Ivy

                "To thine own self be true.......
                Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                Comment


                • #11
                  Thank you, Thijs. (You posted while I was still writing, and as usual I didn't refresh before posting myself). Yes, memories for you, but also things I promise we shall see properly next time.
                  Ivy

                  "To thine own self be true.......
                  Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Once through the barriers and along the narrow path the way opens out and the footpath (just bare soil covered with gravel which is now fast disappearing into the ground!) wanders along with the wherry cut on the right and the millstream to the left. The area between was left natural with the trees and bushes which had grown up over the years.


                    The wherry cut - to the right can be seen one of the houses forming part of the maltings complex

                    P1170551
                    by wherrygirl, on Flickr

                    Looking in the same direction but from further along. The light green seen through the trees on the opposite bank is the paddock of one of the houses

                    P1170555
                    by wherrygirl, on Flickr

                    The above two photos were taken in late November, 2013, yet incredibly there were still plenty of green leaves on the trees.

                    The cut again, but looking in the opposite direction towards the river. This one was taken in September two years earlier, and is still looking very lush.

                    P1080705
                    by wherrygirl, on Flickr

                    For anyone puzzling over "wherry cut" it is the artificial inlet from the river up which the wherry Albion used to sail to offload its cargo. When I first came here to live there were still open-fronted sheds on that opposite bank where the goods were temporarily stored, although it was long since the Albion was seen there. And for the majority of members who have no idea what a wherry is, try this page.
                    Ivy

                    "To thine own self be true.......
                    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      The trees and bushes in this pleasant little oasis were beginning to overshadow the area and - together with the nettles and brambles which were taking over much of the open space - must have prompted the Broads Authority to do something. One day I wandered down there and found that they had effected a massive clearance. Some of the trees had been cut down and most of the nettles and brambles cleared. You could see the sky again here and there!
                      Many of the trees had quite strong growths of ivy reaching quite high up in their canopies. I once had a long conversation with a man down there who had strong feelings about allowing ivy to grow on trees and he wished that the Authority would do something about it. I don't think that the creeper is quite as bad as many people claim, but if allowed to get out of hand it can certainly strangle the tender new shoots at the ends of branches. In an old established growth of ivy its stems become real trunks, firmly attached to that of its host. In the photo below that smooth looking piece of trunk top left of the stump is not the tree, it is the ivy. Follow it down to the ground and you can see how thick it is.
                      This view is taken looking in the same direction as those above (you can see the paddock through the trees on the opposite bank).


                      Felled tree/ivy combination!

                      P1170566 by wherrygirl, on Flickr


                      About facing to look to the opposite side of the site, the sunlit foliage top right of the photo is on the banks of the millstream.

                      P1170556 by wherrygirl, on Flickr
                      Last edited by wherrygirl; March 10th, 2015, 00:38.
                      Ivy

                      "To thine own self be true.......
                      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        A few weeks ago I went down there again and walked to the point where both the wherry cut and the millstream enter the river. It was late afternoon and as I walked to the end the sun caught the delightful clusters of snowdrops scattered about. But their blossoms were tightly shut and after several attempts I gave up for a while. But now that the thermometer has cautiously crept up a little I must go down once more to try and capture their fragile beauty. Perhaps tomorrow. You can see one little clump top left in the photo below.

                        Also a few oompty toomps

                        P1190454
                        by wherrygirl, on Flickr
                        Ivy

                        "To thine own self be true.......
                        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          Before passing the oompty toomps there is a pleasant view of the little footbridge from over at the left where the millstream runs:


                          P1190473
                          by wherrygirl, on Flickr

                          Just a few feet beyond the bridge is the river Waveney. When Thijs & Co. were here last summer I had intended to take them across to the other side on to the narrow path along the river and back to the mill. But the bridge was closed. Across the end stretched a large notice saying it was unsafe. That was very disappointing because from the other side you have some really pleasant views down the river, though I shall be showing some later on.
                          Ivy

                          "To thine own self be true.......
                          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                          Comment

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