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    #31
    Some Australians, one of the world's main producer of Uranium, is up in arms because nuclear wast they sent to France in 1990s and 2000s for processing into a more stable form, is now being returned for permanent storage on Australian soil: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-12-0...rrival/7004088

    Greenpeace has some VERY cleaver Marine Surveyors who can look at a ship from a mile away and determine the condition as "a rust bucket".
    The BBC Shanghai was built in 2001 and is thus soon due for 3rd Special Survey and drydocking.

    As can be seen on this picture, taken in Emden in June this year, she is in need of bottom cleaning and a fresh coat of paint.
    From there to declare it a rust bucket is a bit of a step: (But that isn't going to stop Greenpeace and others from crying wolf)


    Where does the Australians expect that Australian waste should be stored anyhow??

    Comment


      #32
      Pehaps we can use the nuclear waste in a totally different way now, at least according to some scientists which are wloring on the "problem":

      http://video.nationalgeographic.com/...e=relatedvideo

      "Nuclear engineer and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Leslie Dewan is revolutionizing the field of nuclear power by designing a way to power our world with nuclear waste."
      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

      Comment


      • wherrygirl
        wherrygirl commented
        Editing a comment
        Very interesting, Jan Olav. I have not heard anything about this amidst all the arguments when the question of building a new reactor in this country crops up.

      #33
      Australia is not only dangerous / venomous animals. There are also Little Penguins to be found, thanks to a dog called Oddballs: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-35039105

      Wasn't Foxes imported to be hunted for sport at one time??

      Comment


        #34
        I'll listen to that, it's on BBC Radio 4 at 5p.m. Quite a tear-jerker, that photo!
        Ivy

        "To thine own self be true.......
        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

        Comment


          #35
          A rear transformation is happening in the Australian outback at the moment: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-0...-rains/7064248

          While the "do-gooders" in California wants to save the kangaroos from becoming shoes: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-12-3...-limbo/7058626

          Never mind that the Australian Government is spending millions to promote kangaroo meat in China and around the world to ensure that kangaroos can be a resource not a pest: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-07-0...llivan/6603484

          Comment


          • nari
            nari commented
            Editing a comment
            The last time Lake Eyre filled was in 2012, so it is unusual for it to happen only a couple of years later. As for kangaroos, there are plague proportions in many parts of the country, including Canberra, and when we hit a drought they die of starvation anyway - so they may as well be harvested sensibility -hopefully. They are a prominent feature of our local golf course and when they lie on the fairway, they ignore the balls whizzing past their ears.
            Emotions always run high when a controlled shoot is done to control the numbers in the suburbs, but there is little option.
            Having a 7 foot 'roo come through your windscreen is not a nice event......

          #36
          Even going shopping can be dangerous if you live in the northern part of Australia: http://www.vgtv.no/#!/video/123400/b...-av-krokodille

          This happened in Wyndham, WA, but it could happen anywhere were there are brackish water, or even in salt water swamps.
          If you plan on going swimming, stick to the hotel pool.

          Comment


          • nari
            nari commented
            Editing a comment
            I don't know what the talking was about as I do not understand Norwegian, but....anywhere in the north of Australia from northern WA through to the Queensland coast- a couple of thousand kilometres - no river is free from crocs especially in the heat of summer.
            Even the locals can get caught; they think there have been no sightings of years in a particular river and somebody gets
            chewed sooner or later. Freshwater crocs are the hungriest - the salt water ones are less aggressive...
            And the Irukandji jellyfish keeps people out of the water for 6 months or more in summer. It is lethal....

            Oh, and on the subject of dangerous critters: in our back yard which faces bushland, we have to be aware that if something (which hasn't been moved for a while)is lifted up or turned over, more than likely there will be a redback spider with its young underneath in the web. They are rarely fatal to an adult but can kill very young kids unless they get antivenom fast.
            Last edited by nari; January 18th, 2016, 22:16.

          #37
          I knew that hording toilet paper when on special offer would pay off one day: http://www.todayonline.com/world/aus...dic-plane-land

          Comment


          • nari
            nari commented
            Editing a comment
            Nothing like rational thinking paying off in the end. The countryside in this area around the Isa (the size of France) is home to quite a few little beasties, including snakes. If one decides to sleep out, there would be quite a few happy to share with you.There are very long roads where small planes can land if need be, but not much bitumen. What I like is the absolute silence for days on end, interrupted by a semitrailer sometimes.

          #38
          How long can the Australia Government stomach the criticism it is receiving from within and from abroad?: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/31/op...etType=opinion

          Including over this case: http://splash247.com/itf-demands-str...llowed-ashore/
          Has this got something to do with the crew being Chinese??

          Comment


          • ombugge
            ombugge commented
            Editing a comment
            Australia is a signatory to the UNCLOS, the Refugee Convention and the UN Humen rights conventions, all of which it has broken with impunity.
            There is no law against being on small boats in international waters, but Australia has detained people far away from their territorial waters.
            It is a right for people to seek Asylum for protection against persecution, but they have to reach the territory of a country to do so.
            Not everybody who apply may be genuine refugees, but in the case of those detained for years on Nauru and Manus the majority has been found to be so.
            If the reason for all this is "stopping people from risking their life in leaky boats", what is the logic in sending them back in those same boats, risking their life even more. Do the Navy know if any of the boats they have turned around have sunk on the way back?

            "It is no surprise that there is reluctance to support hundreds of people who may depend entirely on handouts"
            The key word here is MAY. How do you know that the next Einstein or Bill Gates isn't sitting on Nauru or Manus right now?
            Australia has taken in thousands of prisoners and refugees over the year, incl. many that did not come there legally. Without them there would not have been an active and thriving population on this arid land.
            How many of the Vietnamese refugees that came in the 1970/80s have been living on handouts all these years and how many are upstanding members of the society?

            Could it have something to do with most of the ones coming now are Muslims?? (Not all mind you)

          • nari
            nari commented
            Editing a comment
            OK, ombugge. Australia has ignored the treaty and we have no heart. There are plenty here who protest against the government's stand but keep out of the media. It is not just muslims - forget race; it is of concern that many refugees will be fully supported by the government and may never need to work again. That is a major problem and not just for us.
            Anyway, we shall amicably agree to disagree?

          • ombugge
            ombugge commented
            Editing a comment
            There are Muslims of all races, but yes the majority are not Caucasians.
            I agree, we will not agree, so let as agree to disagree.

            PS> It is not only happening in Australia: http://www.vg.no/nyheter/innenriks/a...um/a/23782368/
            Last edited by ombugge; September 1st, 2016, 23:00.

          #39
          The 2nd Mate on a Chinese bulker fell asleep and the vessel run aground on Douglas Shoal, off Gladstone back in 2010 and spilled a small amount of oil and left some anti-foaling residue: http://www.gbrmpa.gov.au/media-room/...ng-1-grounding

          This is a part of the Great Barrier Reef and has a steady stream of ships entering and leaving. It is relatively open waters and not under compulsory Pilotage.

          Now Australia is seeking USD 120 Mill. in cost and damages from the Owner (actually the P&I Club): https://gcaptain.com/australia-charg...-barrier-reef/ That is approx. $1,050/sq.m.

          A lot more damage is done by the steady flow of agricultural runoffs: http://www.aims.gov.au/impact-of-runoff
          This is not limited to a small area of 115,000 sq.m. (area of the GBR is approx. 344,000 Sq.km.) and limited time, but is a continuing threat to the reef.
          Area in danger of severe damages cover most of the length of the reef. (total 2,300 km.)
          Highest concentration of coastal and riverine agriculture is from Frasers Island to Cooktown, however. (North of which there are only sparse population

          I wonder if they are monitoring the site to see how much of damage caused by this grounding has been repaired by natural coral growth after 6 years?

          Comment


          • nari
            nari commented
            Editing a comment
            OK, human error can play a large role in accidents. Do these freighters have a frequent turnover of crew (?and officers?) so that few get to know and understand procedures?

          • ombugge
            ombugge commented
            Editing a comment
            80-90% of accident are caused by human errors. That is in general not just at sea.
            The crew on most ships spends 3-6 months on board between leaves. Most have years of experience in their job, but a lookout does not have any training in navigation, nor access to the charts, radar or GPS. It is not their job.
            Navigation Officers are trained and certified to the same minimum standard called STCW, which is international, so the nationality of the ship, or Officers, should not be an issue. (But it is frequently made out to be)
            Fatigue is a recurring problem, although there are rules for working/rest periods, but these are not always adhered to, mainly because of the small crews on the ships today. (I don't KNOW if that was an issue here, but very likely)

          • nari
            nari commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks for the information - I can appreciate the difficulties the captain and officers may well have with a small number of crew. I was on a British freighter going home from Australia in the '50s and the crew were all Muslim, so at certain times all tools were downed and prayers said on the for'ard hold - almost to the rule. As a young girl I was intrigued by this and liked to watch them. They were good cooks! Beautiful curries.

          #40
          Originally posted by ombugge View Post
          The 2nd Mate on a Chinese bulker fell asleep and the vessel run aground on Douglas Shoal, off Gladstone back in 2010 and spilled a small amount of oil and left some anti-foaling residue: http://www.gbrmpa.gov.au/media-room/...ng-1-grounding

          This is a part of the Great Barrier Reef and has a steady stream of ships entering and leaving. It is relatively open waters and not under compulsory Pilotage.

          Now Australia is seeking USD 120 Mill. in cost and damages from the Owner (actually the P&I Club): https://gcaptain.com/australia-charg...-barrier-reef/ That is approx. $1,050/sq.m.

          A lot more damage is done by the steady flow of agricultural runoffs: http://www.aims.gov.au/impact-of-runoff
          This is not limited to a small area of 115,000 sq.m. (area of the GBR is approx. 344,000 Sq.km.) and limited time, but is a continuing threat to the reef.
          Area in danger of severe damages cover most of the length of the reef. (total 2,300 km.)
          Highest concentration of coastal and riverine agriculture is from Frasers Island to Cooktown, however. (North of which there are only sparse population

          I wonder if they are monitoring the site to see how much of damage caused by this grounding has been repaired by natural coral growth after 6 years?
          It has been settled out of court at A$ 39.3 : ​https://gcaptain.com/australia-settl...eef-grounding/

          Comment


          • nari
            nari commented
            Editing a comment
            This issue of agricultural runoff has been a problem, as you well know, for decades. When I was in the Whitsundays at the end of 1961, quite a few people in the know were very concerned about the inevitable affect on coral. That was nearly 50 years ago....and unfortunately the mainland (the Eastern coast) is prime land for agriculture.

          #41
          Will there finally be a solution or the 1200 people that has been held on Manus and Nauru for a long time now?: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...l/3284664.html

          Most of the asylum seekers and refugees held here are Muslims so they have to get this done in the next few weeks, though. Or will Trump prove to be pro-Muslim once in the Oval office??

          Comment


          • nari
            nari commented
            Editing a comment
            On the Oz news it was reported that the Manus and Nauru island refugees are looking forward to going to the USA. If that does happen, I wonder how it fits with the new president's immigration policies?? And for how long??

          #42
          The refugees are still on Manus and Nauru and still looking forward to go to USA, if Trump will allow them to.
          If not, will they languish in the concentration camps forever?: http://www.todayonline.com/world/aus...n-men-paradise

          Comment


            #43
            I thought that the iron ore trains in the Pilbara was running driverless, until I read this report:
            https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news...tback-10904344

            Comment


            • wherrygirl
              wherrygirl commented
              Editing a comment
              I wonder what was going through the poor driver's mind as his wagonloads tore past him?

            #44
            I don't want to say in polite company.

            Comment

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