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THIS IS CORSICA

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    THIS IS CORSICA

    Probably Corsica is one of my favorite places to spend holidays since more than twenty years. When thinking about, a lot of people imagine sandy beaches, blue sun, farniente. That’s true, indeed. But before all Corsica is a mountain with more than fifty summits above 2000 meters, ski spots in winter and one of the most famous and difficult foot track in France (GR20). See www.le-gr20.com English version. I did a part of it 15 years ago (the easiest part!) and it was really a great experience.
    Until the 20th century the coasts were mostly inhabited because the economy was a pastoral one linked with olive trees and chestnut groves productions. Moreover, in the old times the sea symbolized the Barbarian’s raids so Corsican stayed in their perched villages. It can seem amazing for islanders but they never were seamen or fishers, except for the North (Cap Corse).
    In the 60’s and 70’s when the Mediterranean coastline was devastated by concrete, speculators and awful architects, Corsica preserved its identity by the actions of nationalist movements, mostly violent (attacks, bombing, destruction of building sites..) and, in a way I prefer, by the action of the Conservatoire du Littoral (you can compare with British National Trust). So that, it’s easy to find natural areas and protected sceneries all over the island. In addition, the Corsican culture, musical tradition and home language are still strongly alive.
    Due to the relief the island is a kaleidoscope of micro-regions, each has its own landscapes and history. Since my last trips took place in the North and Center I stayed in the South this spring, in Porto Vecchio and Coti Chiavari.
    Photos will come soon.


    #2
    Usually since there is a direct fly fron Caen to Ajaccio, I reach Corsica by plane but this time I took the ferry in Marseille to have a look to the MUCEM, a new museum dedicated to the Mediterranean cultures.Its site: www.mucem.org The exhibition about the history of carnivals and their meaning was quite interresting.

    So the trip to Corsica begins in Marseille.

    The MUCEM.




    Its "skin"



    La Major cathedral from the top.

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      #3
      Familiar pictures to me, since my sister is living since about a year now in Marseille. We did not manage to visit her there up to now. But Corsica is high up on my list of places-i-must-go-to.
      So i am very glad to see a travel report here! Bravo, Yves!!
      Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

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      • yvneac
        yvneac commented
        Editing a comment
        Marseille has not a good reputation but in my opinion it is a very attractive city with a lot of places to see and an atmosphere to enjoy.People can be friendly and helpful,, no doubt more than in Paris (that is not difficult anyway).
        The surroundings,Cassis and the calanques for instance,give you an opportunity to do nice walks in a delightful nature.
        As for Corsica, if you manage to go there don't hesitate to ask me, I will answer as far as possible.

      #4
      Notre Dame de la Garde,known as la Bonne Mère.



      The same at night.



      The entrance of Vieux Port.



      And the Chateau d'If a former jail celebrated by Alexandre Dumas in Le Comte De Monte-Christo.

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        #5
        Nice, looking forward for more visuals from Corsica!

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          #6
          The funny thing is that during my stay here, the H. Cup rugby match Toulon-Munster was played at the Velodrome stadium.The Irish supporters have "hired" a pub on the quays of Vieux Port and since I wore a red blouson they thought I was a Munster Boy.When they saw my blue sweat and heard my French accent,nevertheless they invited Françoise and me to join for "cup of tea".
          Nice mix-up!

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            #7
            A picture of Yves with a drink in his hand - there's something you don't see often on CVF!!

            Great photos Yves - enjoying sharing Corsica with you.
            Cheers,

            Mark.

            www.pologlover.co.uk

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              #8
              Originally posted by PoloUK View Post
              A picture of Yves with a drink in his hand - there's something you don't see often on CVF!!
              But,you know,only one glass at the same time.That's my rule.

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                #9
                After one night aboard a SNCM ferry (the boats of the company were confortable...twenty years ago....) I landed in Porto Vecchio where stayed at Le Goeland (seagull) hotel.

                Hi Cecilia!









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                  #10






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                    #11
                    Hi Yves! - in reply to #9 and even though I haven'’t been to Corsica!
                    But I can see that the Seagull Hotel is definitely my kind of place. There is a LOT of choices for “favourite chair” in #9/3, 4, or shall I simply perch on the rocks in #10 little-mermaid-style - clearly a good shipspotting place

                    I am apt to get behind in threads lingering over a Guinness, but mustn'’t forget the earlier photos of the castle jail with its literary connections (enticing combination), and especially that surreal view across the roof of the museum in #2/3.

                    Comment


                    • yvneac
                      yvneac commented
                      Editing a comment
                      No call in Corsica with Serenissima,Cecilia ?

                    • Seagull
                      Seagull commented
                      Editing a comment
                      The October/November cruise will spend a lot of time going around Sicily, before heading for the north African coast.
                      I have a recollection that there might have been an itinerary that did include Corsica, but can't immediately spot it in Noble Caledonia's offerings.
                      This week, the ship has just been to Sardinia, but is now heading for Spain I think (I get irritated when cruise companies are just a bit TOO quick updating their websites - I would have thought it was a good thing to have the current cruise itinerary at least visible so that friends and family of folk on that cruise can follow it - surely a good advertisment for future voyages.

                    #12
                    Even though this time I didn’t dive, swim in blue and clear water is a kind of a gods’ gift. Spring is a perfect season in Corsica to enjoy the beaches due to the lack of crowd. Water is a bit cold, of course, but when you live in Normandy you don’t mind!
                    The bay for my first bath here, in Pinarello, close to Porto vecchio.
                    In the background on the first picture you can see a tour gênoise (a Genovese tower) typical of the Corsican coastline. Built by the authorities of the Republic of Gênes in 16th and 17th to protect village communities against pirates, more than sixty still stands today all over Corsica, classified as Historical Monuments.







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                      #13
                      Little stone bridges are another curiosity of the Corsican country side. Built during the Genovese administration, mostly in 16th and 17th, they had to open up isolated villages and facilitate the commerce of olive oil, chestnut flour, wheat….
                      Narrow ridged deck, one arch, they were made for the crossing of two mules, even if nowadays you will meet chiefly hikers around.
                      Solid and secure, they have resisted to time and torrential flow of mountain rivers, often in better condition than newer bridges. Located right in the middle of maquis (scrub?) or pinewoods they are a peaceful place for a stop when walking on the foot tracks.

                      Spin'a cavallu, near Sartène.







                      Zippotoli, close to Bastelica.







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                        #14
                        Bonifacio, separate from Sardinia by les Bouches, is the most southern city of France. Some particularities make it a bit different than the rest of Corsica.
                        First, a special language is spoken here and if Corsicans speak an archaic Toscan-Pisan, Bonifacians use an old Genovese dialect. Of course everybody speaks French but Corsica is, with Alsace and Brittany, a region where a home language is still alive in the daily life, so the “linguistic isolat” of Bonifacio makes sense.
                        Second, in an island mainly granite, this area is a limestone region that gives a thrilling contrast between the white cliffs and the Mediterranean blue of the sea.
                        The upper city with its citadelle is located on a promontory of 70m elevation, 1500m long and 200 wide, so in a way when you walk along the ramparts you can feel as being above a fjord...…in a totally different climate, indeed.
                        Advice. In case you manage a trip here, try to avoid the high season owing to the crowd. I did it few years ago and I may say that it was a kind of challenge to find a place to sit and enjoy the beautiful landscape. As for a place in a car park, don'’t hope, even in a dream. But, in spring or autumn you will not be disappointed, this site is a must when travelling in Corsica.

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                          #15







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