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TWO WEEKS IN DUBAÏ

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    TWO WEEKS IN DUBAÏ




    At the beginning of March I spent two weeks in Dubaï, a stunning country which appears to me as a laboratory of post modernity, a playing field for international architecture, a temple erected to the gods of the consumer society.
    It was my first trip in the Middle-East, so a lot of things were amazing to me which are not to regular visitors of this part of the world but I think Dubaï has a real peculiarity. First of all, this town seems to be a perpetual building site and even in the districts already built, cranes, bulldozers and pneumatic drills are working. With humor, a taxi driver told me he has to actualize his GPS every week to reach new places not yet listed.
    The new areas, downtown Khalifa, Jumeira beach, the Palms, DubaÏ marina skyline, are an aesthetic thrill since when they build towers they make them high but also beautiful and often original. In another hand this property frenzy can be a Chinese puzzle for pedestrians due to the lack of pavements, so the paradox is that you have to take a cab to reach the tube station or the bus stop.
    As only 20% of the population is locals, the town is a kaleidoscope of more than 100 nationalities from Europe, America, Asia and Africa. Of course the standards of life are not the same and without intentional polemics I could say that trade-unions are not very welcome on the territory…..
    Photos and more comments to come later.

    #2
    As I stayed at the entrance of Jumeirah Palm (I could say on the trunk) my first visual contact was the skyline of New Dubai Marina. During these two weeks it was each day a renewed pleasure to look at it in different conditions of time, weather and light.
    This area is a district of 5 square-km built on an artificial isle where the architects had a tremendous time. It is told that in the next tower, each floor will be able to turn around its axis independently of the others.

    The view from my room.




    Comment


    • ombugge
      ombugge commented
      Editing a comment
      I was first time in Dubai in 1966. At that time there were no port and no highrised buildings.
      We anchor off the town and discharged (mostly Cadillacs) onto cargo Dhows, which disappeared into the creek.
      Coming back there many times in the early 1970s there was an artificial port, some high rises (not to today's level) and the Sultan had built his first Yacht.
      I was last there in the mid-1980s, during the Iran-Iraq war, when it was a kind of a "wild middle-east", where anything goes.
      Today it is indeed the playground of the rich and the land of opportunities for those who know how to do it.
      I know a lot of people that would live nowhere else.

    • yvneac
      yvneac commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes Ombugge, I see what you mean.At the Museum I saw photos of what was the country in the 50's and 60's and the less we can say is that it has changed a lot.
      For me, nowadays, it's a perfect place to go to experience what is the "outrageousness" of human projects and in this way it is fascinating.But believe me, no chance I live there one day:"I don't know how to do it" as you said.
      By the way I can tell you there are a lot of yachts now.But they mostly stay at their pontoons!!

    #3
    The marina in the morning.






    The Infinity tower designed in the shape of the human ADN.


    Comment


      #4
      Ever since you mentioned that you were going to Dubai I've been awaiting your return so as to hear your impressions and see the pictures. I suppose my main reason was because of the outrageousness of the projects - as you describe them - and so I wanted to learn what you think about the place. I like the idea of the tower with the independantly revolving floors, outrageous indeed - who presses the button, I wonder?
      I am looking forward to more of your photos, Yves.
      Ivy

      "To thine own self be true.......
      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

      Comment


      • yvneac
        yvneac commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes Ivy who presses the button is the good question.Sure I will not be this one.

      #5
      In the early evening.







      Comment


        #6
        And at night.







        Comment


          #7
          That last photo in particular is very attractive, and also #5.2 though how, if they are private accommodation, I should hate to live in such a place! So shut in.
          But they are all beautiful views, Yves, because - despite my horror of skyscrapers - you have captured the subtle light of early and late day in a way that brings out the variation in design between the individual buildings.
          Ivy

          "To thine own self be true.......
          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

          Comment


            #8
            Cool skyline indeed!

            Comment


              #9
              This one, taken in the early morming, just before breakfast.I saw the towers wriggling out of the mist.A pure moment of charm.



              The next to show to Ombugge that from time to time the yachts leave the harbour.

              Comment


                #10
                As I said before, Dubaî is all except a paradise for the pedestrians, but few places are quiet enough to pleasantly idle, not to worry about the traffic.
                The Marina Walk is one of these places where the Dubaïotes and expats like meet together outside bars and restaurants before reaching the beach to swim in a blue and warm sea. Traditionally on Friday and Saturday the area is very crowded and the atmosphere nice and easy.
                Sometimes you come across cute things, like these sand castles.






                The same at night.

                Comment


                  #11
                  Dubai is indeed one of the most craziest places of the world. I am very curious, if they will manage the turn around from an oil- to a touristic country or/and a business place after the decrease of their oil reserves. Maybe we then have a lot of motifs for the "abandoned places" thread. A lot what they do, appears to me far away from being economical or profitable.
                  Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

                  Comment


                    #12
                    Ralf,

                    It’s already the case. As a friend of mine who works for Sclumberger since five years in the Emirates told me, with less than 20 years of patrol and gas reserves, Dubaï can’t bases its economy on hydrocarbons, contrary to Abou Dhabi.
                    So the solution is to create an international financial place with favorable politics about taxes, an extensive activity for real estate and the development of a high standard tourism. Last year already more than ten millions of visitors came there and it will increase. New amusement parks, new big hotels are built or will be in the future (and here the future is almost the present!).Beaches, the largest malls in the world to find all sorts of luxury goods, even the opportunity to practice skiing, all in a safe country, they fill a good niche in the market.
                    Big companies have managing staff, even their head offices in the Dubaï World trade center. Notice that if you want to create your business, as a foreigner, you have to register with a Dubaïote partner who gives you only his name not his time. Clever isn’t it?
                    Concurrently, with a free education from school to university for each Dubaïote (notice: only locals) the goal is to turn out a population adapted for the rules of high technology and new economy. Engineers, doctors, managers, lawyers are expected to make a fresh start after the patrol age.

                    PS.they learned quickly how to exploit the contradictions of the modern capitalism.

                    Comment


                    • Ralf__
                      Ralf__ commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yes, i've heard about all these activities, but i have my doubts, if that will work fine in the future. In my opinion all this is oversized. But the future will tell us.

                    #13
                    WOW.Lime+Mint.Yummy!!!!!!

                    Comment


                      #14



                      Self- proclaimed “heighth wonder of the world” Jumeirah Palm is the only one palm achieved so far. The works on Deira and Jebel Ali are more or less stopped for technical and financial reasons. Same for The World, a group of more than 200 artificial islands supposed to represent all the countries on the Globe.
                      The Palm is composed of a trunk where one can find hotels residences, two large roads with a tunnel under the sea and a monorail to reach the top. The palms are only built of villas and the crescent surrounds the whole structure.
                      From the entrance and the top you have a 15minutes taxi trip. No means to reach it by foot, the tunnel is forbidden for pedestrians. When I asked for the walk way, the person I was speaking to was beaming as it appeared as an absurd idea.
                      At the top of the crescent, the Atlantis Hotel is unfortunately non open to non residents……

                      Comment


                        #15
                        The monorail.



                        Villas on the palms.






                        Fairmont hotel on the trunk.

                        Comment

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