Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A few images from Burma

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • pakarang
    started a topic A few images from Burma

    A few images from Burma

    A few images from Burma

    Many years ago, I went to Burma for a sessions of meetings and negotiations, and to visit the former coastal steamer Kong Olav.

    Here is an image of Victoria Point in Burma.


  • pakarang
    replied
    hahahahaha.... being on a group tour certainly has its restrictions. Perhaps the reason why I enjoy travelling with less people.

    Nothing calms my spirit and myself more than those times I can spend in front of any (significant) Buddha. I often fall into some kind of spiritual transe, during meditation... and I can even seriously loose track of time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied
    If I was living in Yangon, the thing that would bring me back here time and time again and which interests me greatly would be the long row of statues at the other side of the reclining Buddha. They are intended to illustrate the many attitudes and gestures - asanas and mudras - which have meanings related to events in the life of the Buddha.









    You are perhaps lucky that I was with a group on this occasion, as on my own I could easily imagine myself photographing (and subsequently posting!) them all!

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied
    Many people were meditating in front of the Buddha, and there was a calm and peaceful atmosphere. Tourists generally crowd around a platform at the feet of the Buddha from where a view of the whole length of the statue may be seen, resulting in rather similar-looking photos. I tried to take details and different images.











    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied
    After visiting Shwedagon pagoda, our group continued to nearby Chauk Htat Gyi to see a 65m long Reclining Buddha which is covered in a shed-like structure amongst trees beside monastic buildings.




    You might be able to see some people in the bottom left which I managed to include for scale, whilst not seeming intrusive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    commented on 's reply
    Despite recent indications of rapid change, so much in Myanmar still seems like a step back in time.
    Such were my contrasting impressions of the tourist visitor centre with the very different environment within Shwedagon Pagoda. I felt at home there too, and am so happy to have shared that with you in those images.

    It has made me wonder how long ago it might have been since major "tourists sights" in Bangkok, such as Wat Arun and the temple of the Emerald Buddha in the Grand Palace, still felt like places being predominantly used by the local people as they had been in the past. When were your earliest visits to those places in Thailand, pakarang?

  • pakarang
    replied
    Incredibly emotional and spiritual images. Looking at these images, I feel so "at home", and not like a stranger that I feel like in Norway. I'm one odd person indeed, I have always felt much more at home and much more at ease in environments like that. Perhaps I had a past life in the Sukothai era, as a servant for some high ranking person?

    Great images by the way!

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied
    If I could only have two favourite images I think they would be these...







    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied






    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied






    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied










    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied
    It might seem from everything I've posted so far that Yangon consists only of the street grid between the Strand and the railway line, but of course you know that is not the case from ombugge's posts.
    But I think I mentioned in passing that the group had a tour by bus on the morning of the full day in Yangon. (Yes, it amazes me too that I did so much in only one and a half days in total!)

    Driving by green parks and a lake we arrived at Shwedagon Pagoda. Every tourist to Yangon visits here sometime during their trip, and even though we had started out early to avoid crowds it still felt as if they were ALL there simultaneously, right then being disgorged from buses and swarming upwards by steps or lift towards the big new Visitor Centre reception. For the first time I actually felt I was a "tourist", which I hadn't in my explorations the previous afternoon.

    But fortunately as on all Noble Caledonia trips everything is included and we bypassed the hubbub of ticket purchasing and guides (official and otherwise) touting for business, and had only to gather around our own guide who handled our tickets, and saw us through the airport style security check and the shoe deposit counter. (He had ensured that we all conformed to the dress code before we left the hotel, so there would be no delay at the astonishingly busy cover-up clothing point - not that anyone in our well travelled and prepared group were not already totally fit to go!)

    And so we entered into the pagoda precincts and, it felt to me, as if into a different world.

    It is a huge area, the landmark central pagoda itself surrounded by an amazing complex of shrines and stupas and the glitter of gold.

    Shwedagon is the most sacred Buddhist pagoda in Myanmar. It is regularly visited not only by Yangon local people but also those from throughout the country. Although I knew that there are other entrances, it astonished me how my initial touristy impression and even the tourists themselves seemed to have all but disappeared in the predominantly local scene. There was a feeling of experiencing a place being used as it has been for centuries.

    There follows ten images from my morning in Shwedagon.


    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    A beautiful looking hotel in an amazing destination no doubt.

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    commented on 's reply
    That's it, or rather WAS the "Book Street". The new and organised one will never be the same as the one I remember though. (Chaotic and noisy)
    It will probably be like when Singapore tried to revive the old Bugis Street. It became a replacement for Change Alley in stead.

  • Seagull
    commented on 's reply
    I didn't, but I see you photographed some bookstalls laid out along the pavement and under the shade of the roadside trees in #68/2

    There have apparently been some changes, discussed in these articles of January and February 2017:-
    https://www.mmtimes.com/lifestyle/24...side-home.html
    https://frontiermyanmar.net/en/a-new...on-booksellers
    http://yangonlife.com.mm/en/article/book-street-yangon
Working...
X