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A few images from Burma

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      If I could only have two favourite images I think they would be these...







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        Incredibly emotional and spiritual images. Looking at these images, I feel so "at home", and not like a stranger that I feel like in Norway. I'm one odd person indeed, I have always felt much more at home and much more at ease in environments like that. Perhaps I had a past life in the Sukothai era, as a servant for some high ranking person?

        Great images by the way!
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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        • Seagull
          Seagull commented
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          Despite recent indications of rapid change, so much in Myanmar still seems like a step back in time.
          Such were my contrasting impressions of the tourist visitor centre with the very different environment within Shwedagon Pagoda. I felt at home there too, and am so happy to have shared that with you in those images.

          It has made me wonder how long ago it might have been since major "tourists sights" in Bangkok, such as Wat Arun and the temple of the Emerald Buddha in the Grand Palace, still felt like places being predominantly used by the local people as they had been in the past. When were your earliest visits to those places in Thailand, pakarang?

        After visiting Shwedagon pagoda, our group continued to nearby Chauk Htat Gyi to see a 65m long Reclining Buddha which is covered in a shed-like structure amongst trees beside monastic buildings.




        You might be able to see some people in the bottom left which I managed to include for scale, whilst not seeming intrusive.

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          Many people were meditating in front of the Buddha, and there was a calm and peaceful atmosphere. Tourists generally crowd around a platform at the feet of the Buddha from where a view of the whole length of the statue may be seen, resulting in rather similar-looking photos. I tried to take details and different images.











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            If I was living in Yangon, the thing that would bring me back here time and time again and which interests me greatly would be the long row of statues at the other side of the reclining Buddha. They are intended to illustrate the many attitudes and gestures - asanas and mudras - which have meanings related to events in the life of the Buddha.









            You are perhaps lucky that I was with a group on this occasion, as on my own I could easily imagine myself photographing (and subsequently posting!) them all!

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              hahahahaha.... being on a group tour certainly has its restrictions. Perhaps the reason why I enjoy travelling with less people.

              Nothing calms my spirit and myself more than those times I can spend in front of any (significant) Buddha. I often fall into some kind of spiritual transe, during meditation... and I can even seriously loose track of time.
              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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