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A few images from Burma

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    #31
    And anything your household may need:




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      #32
      Nothing like a good cigar to pass the time between customers:


      These helps clean your kidneys:

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        #33
        Nothing like some fresh fish for lunch:

        As I prepared to take the picture the seller lady quickly chased away most of the flies.

        What about some pottery?? Here is a basket full:


        Too dull. What pattern do you want??:
        Last edited by ombugge; April 24th, 2011, 05:16.

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          #34
          Let us enter the Market:


          Medicine of all kinds on sale at a song:

          Some may even work.

          Going fishing and need some nets and ropes??:

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            #35
            Or in need of some roses for the wife??:

            It helps, whatever it is you have to apologize for.

            More stalls outside the market:


            Tricycles are not just for tourists in Yangon, it is the transportation of choice:

            I saw a big fat lady with two 50kg bags of rice being transported on one, but didn't manage to get a picture.

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              #36
              Back out on the main road, with chaotic traffic and pedestrians mingling anywhere:


              There is a kind of system and the traffic generally move on the right:

              Unless there is some obstructions, in which case anything goes.

              Not to give the impression that there are no modern shops in Yangon:


              This store front and building could be anywhere in Asia:

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                #37
                Back to the River

                After a little break we went back to the river, but further upriver this time. (Near Strand Hotel)

                My favourite Seafood Restaurant by the name "Junior Duck" (for whatever reason) is situated near the Ferry Wharf, but it was closed this early in the day. (I had dinner there a few days earlier, but no pictures taken)

                Since I could not get up to the restaurant to take pictures from some elevation, here is some pictures of the cross river ferry traffic from street level.

                A ferry leaving the wharf:




                The other ferries are all on the opposite bank:

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                  #38
                  This Buoy Tender doesn't look like it moves very often:

                  I remember seeing it in the same place last time I visited, and the time before.

                  But it is undergoing repairs and maintenance, so one of these days it may sail again:

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                    #39
                    A modern tug was alongside:


                    And the "longtail" boats where everywhere:


                    After this marathon session I need to take a break. In the next installment I'll take you on a walk along "The Strand" and around the old down town area, where time has stood still for decades. (Much of it could be posted in the "Abandoned houses and buildings" thread)

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                      #40
                      Scarcely through my breakfast coffee and I feel like lunch already after seeing those River Prawns in post #17!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!…and the “proudly brewed” local beer too!
                      Such an interesting thread Ombugge. How terrific that old boat yard is still there…great photos those.
                      Yes, I see what you mean about the pagoda being well maintained. I like how you got it framed by the tree in your photo.
                      Always nice to stroll around the market stalls with you! Oh, I must single out the rope shop…very photogenic.

                      Is the style of ferry in #37 typical of the region and built for this purpose? – I was wondering what sort of age it would be.

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                        #41
                        Originally posted by Seagull View Post
                        Scarcely through my breakfast coffee and I feel like lunch already after seeing those River Prawns in post #17!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!…and the “proudly brewed” local beer too!
                        What about the bottle opener beside it?? It is not a home made "one off" as I noticed the same "tool" being used at other places. Ingenious isn't it??

                        Such an interesting thread Ombugge. How terrific that old boat yard is still there…great photos those.
                        I remembered visiting some boat yards along the Thaketa River many years ago and was curious to find out if anybody were still building boats in the traditional way. As you can see there is at least one such yard left.

                        Yes, I see what you mean about the pagoda being well maintained. I like how you got it framed by the tree in your photo.
                        That is one thing that strikes me in Burma, no matter how bad things gets the Pagodas are always well maintained and the grounds well tended.
                        But it does not only apply to Pagodas, also to Christian Churches, Mosques and Taoist Temples.
                        You will see examples of this later on in this thread.
                        PS> That is the Botahtaung Pagoda that is shown. One of the well known Pagodas in Yangon. (Entrance fee charged for foreigners)

                        Always nice to stroll around the market stalls with you! Oh, I must single out the rope shop…very photogenic.
                        I thought you and others would enjoy the market visit and the atmosphere there. Typical S.E.Asia of old and still existing in many parts, but not much in the big modern cities of Asia.
                        PS> The market shown is a small one called Ye Kyaw, not the larger and better known Bogyoke Aung San in the more touristy part of town.

                        Is the style of ferry in #37 typical of the region and built for this purpose? – I was wondering what sort of age it would be.
                        These ferries carries only people and their bicycles or "mopeds", no cars. Since the river crossing is short and the current strong they appears to "crawl" sideways across the river, angling their bow slightly to the current. (Much like the Cable Ferries in Holland, only no cables)

                        I presume these are purpose built, with easy access from both sides. There are three ferries on this particular crossing, one leaving every 20 min.
                        Last edited by ombugge; April 24th, 2011, 10:13. Reason: Add PS

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                          #42
                          Before we go for a walk along The Strand, here is a few aerial pictures of Yangon, taken through the airplane window in the late afternoon with the haze building up and thus not too sharp.

                          A bit of the suburbs, with the large Shwedagon Pagoda on your left:


                          Inaya Lake prominently at centre and the downtown area in the far background:

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                            #43
                            Rangoon River. The port and down town area is just barely visible in the distance:


                            The town is disappearing in the haze. The landscape becomes distinctly rural as soon as you cross the river:

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                              #44
                              Pagodas stand out prominently in this flat and featureless delta landscape:

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                                #45
                                Thank you so much Ombugge, for these photos! They bring back such memories and thoughts...and keep them in the present!
                                I simply LOVE those little pots- the plain terra cotta ones. I wish I could learn how to export so many of the wonderful things I see in Asia back here...just like these pots! So many unusual things I have seen and want to share with my friends.

                                Yes--all the religious places are so beautifully maintained. It's one of the reasons Burma affected me so. That, and how the people smile from inside....always smiling, it seemed.

                                This is such a delightful thread...thank you for posting!

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