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    Originally posted by Seagull View Post
    I didn't have any time to spend solving the last puzzle –too many other things on the go –but if I had, I doubt if I would have come up with mud volcano given the size of the “fireball” in the photo.

    Definitions of the term mud volcano always hasten to point out that it is a gas release phenomena and not a volcano in the sense of an eruption of lava.
    But now looking at Steve’s link, there is the suggestion that in this particular case there was an actual volcano in the vicinity, and molten lava is mentioned!

    If this is so, then perhaps it was this hot lava that ignited the methane gas to produce the vastly bigger explosion than is normally associated with mud volcanoes in the area.

    Ah Ombugge, this post just crossed with your last edit of yours . . .
    So if there isn't any molten lava here, then I'm back to wondering about the ignition and sheer size of the "fireball" again!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    What a puzzle - this one could run and run....
    This puzzle may be solve in as much as where it is, but the what may not be entirely solved yet. I took the term Mud Volcano to indicate Methane release, since there was a clear burning "Fireball". I likewise assumed that the refr. to lava flow was just a mistake from whomever had written the piece, being confused by the term Mud Volcano into believing that it has something to do with actual volcanoes.

    Just now I found this refr. to a volcanic eruption on Rambree Island:
    Volcanic News: Burma, Feb 20, 2007
    A volcano located on Rambree Island in Arakan State, Burma, erupted yesterday as local people closely watched the situation without fear, reported townspeople yesterday by phone to Narinjara.
    The eruption of the volcano started at 11:30 am and lasted only ten minutes, spewing ash and hot gasses a few kilometers into the sky.
    The volcano is situated about one mile north of Sit Taung Village under Sai Khron Village Tract in Kyauk Pru District. Local Arakanese people call the mountain "Nagadaung", which translates to "Dragon Mountain" in English.
    Local people had previously believed that the volcano was extinct, but they are now filled with wonder as the volcano has erupted.
    The article was accompanied by this picture, showing a typical volcano, not a Mud Volcano at all:

    This is said to be the Dragon Mountain Volcano.

    Maybe I misunderstood the original text (See Steve's link above), which refers to two dates, none being the same as for the above eruption.
    This is obviously a active volcanic area, but it is possible that an "ordinary" volcanic eruption can be combined with a release of Methane Gas, or that it occurs on flat ground, in what appears to be a delta-like area? (Original pics)

    Could the whole thing be that the Photographer has been catching a volcanic eruption from some distance and got the top of the "fireball" only?
    When a Mud Volcano erupted in the same area, could somebody have used this picture as illustration only?

    It still don't tally, unless the whole term Mud Volcano has been used in vain here.

    If I haven't said it before, I'll repeat it now; not everything you read, or see on the news is necessarily the truth, or actual facts.
    Last edited by ombugge; April 16th, 2011, 16:01.

    Comment


      This Dragon Mountain Nagadaung doesn’t appear in the Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program database, in which I could only see three volcanoes in Burma listed.
      http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/region.cfm?rnum=0705
      These volcanoes are all far from being currently active!
      And having now read briefly about the general geology, I’d regard mention of molten lava flows and molten magma in the various news media as journalistic confusion.
      “General” pictures that mistakenly become identified with specific places/events may well have made things even worse (I nearly said “muddied the situation”!!!!), and altogether this seems to be rather a splendid example of the continual need for that note of caution at the end of your post.

      The mud volcanoes of Burma are however well known and classic examples of their type– I’ve been browsing some abstracts of papers, but I don’t have free online access to the journals in this subject area. It does seem though that the size and amounts of released gases can be greater than I had immediately supposed.

      Comment


        so cool! Can't wait to show this to the fam!!! Mud Volcano.....

        Well, I was sorta close......LOL

        I remember as a child driving past a big oil refinery every Sunday after church on the way to the country club for Sunday dinner with my grandparents. I was fascinated with the huge flame from the tall pipe that never had any smoke..Natural gas burning off...don't know why that memory just came to mind...must be the methane fireball reference.. but it made me smile....THANKS!!!!!

        Comment


          Here is the next puzzle.

          What is the name of this Temple:


          Where is it located and why is it so special?
          Last edited by ombugge; April 16th, 2011, 16:03.

          Comment


            Could this be the reason why this place is considered to be so special?

            Javanese folklore has it that during the 15th century, Princess Roro Anteng (daughter of the Majapahit King Brawijaya) and her husband Joko Seger fled marauding Islamic forces, ending up in safety at Mount Bromo. Here they developed a new kingdom, and named it Teng-ger using parts of their respective surnames.

            The Kingdom of Tengger prospered and their religion flourished, but the royal couple were unable to produce an heir to the throne. In desperation they prayed and meditated on Bromo for many days before the crater opened and the almighty god Hyang Widi Wasa announced that they would be given children, with the condition that the last borne was to be sacrificed back to the mountain.

            No less than 25 children were produced, but many years later Roro and Joko broke the condition and refused to sacrifice their last borne, Prince Kesuma. A dreadful eruption of Bromo followed and swallowed Kesuma into the crater. To appease the great God, Kesuma's brothers and sisters held an offering ceremony at the crater once every year, and this still happens today — the famous Upacara Kasada held on the full moon of the 12th month (Kasada) of the Tenggerese calendar.


            But i must add that i have read two different versions of this, in the other version the last child was sacrificed.


            I believe that this could be the Poten Hindu Temple in the Bromo-Tengger-Semeru National Park in eastern Java. The temple is situated on the edge of what is called the 'Sea of Sand', at the base of an active volcano called Bromo. The area is popular with tourists, and on a few occasions unlucky tourists have been either killed or seriously injured by flying lumps of lava.

            From a different angle this is what you would see behind the temple.



            And on one of Mount Bromo's more active days.....



            The big clue for solving this one was the strange grey coloured sand in the foreground of your picture ombugge, at first i thought it might be a dry lake bed or something similar, and promptly wasted a couple of hours searching for the wrong thing. It finally occured to me that the strange grey sand could be from a volcano, so i typed 'Volcano Temple' into google. Bingo!
            Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

            Comment


              What an incredible place. One more to add to my list of "places to visit before I die".

              Comment


                Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
                I believe that this could be the Poten Hindu Temple in the Bromo-Tengger-Semeru National Park in eastern Java. The temple is situated on the edge of what is called the 'Sea of Sand', at the base of an active volcano called Bromo.
                Spot on Steve. It is indeed Poton Hindu Temple. The story about the origin of the Tengger people and their brand of Hinduism, which is similar but yet distinctly different from the Hinduism practised on Bali, is quite fascinating.

                The big clue for solving this one was the strange grey coloured sand in the foreground of your picture ombugge, at first i thought it might be a dry lake bed or something similar, and promptly wasted a couple of hours searching for the wrong thing. It finally occured to me that the strange grey sand could be from a volcano, so i typed 'Volcano Temple' into google. Bingo!
                I was expecting that the desert-like surroundings would confuse the matter and lead everybody to look at India.
                Besides the colour of the sand, the clue that it is not in an arid area is the treeline on top of the "hills" in the background, which is actually the rim of an active volcano.

                Very well done Steve, cracking this one within a few hours only. I expected this to be difficult, due to the remoteness and relatively little knowledge of the fact that remnants of active Hinduism still exist on Java, not only on Bali.

                Now it is your turn again to try to challenge the puzzle solving abilities of the CVF family.

                Comment


                  Yes, i noticed the greenery in the picture, that was one of the factors that prompted me to think that the temple might be set in some sort of lake that had dried recently. But a closer look at the levels of the ground around the temple steered me away from that idea. I noticed that at the bottom of the steps to the right of the temple there was a statue, the ground level there seemed a fair bit lower than it was towards the left of the temple, so any water would cover the statue, so i guessed that it was not set in a lake after all.

                  Also, now i have studied your photo a bit more, and now being armed with the knowledge that there is a volcano right next door, i have noticed that the sand seems to be covered in small pot marks, looks like there might have recently been some activity from the volcano that showered the area with small pieces of debris.

                  Well, i shall see what i can find to post next, i have not got anything lined up, so give me a while to find something.
                  Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
                    Also, now i have studied your photo a bit more, and now being armed with the knowledge that there is a volcano right next door, i have noticed that the sand seems to be covered in small pot marks, looks like there might have recently been some activity from the volcano that showered the area with small pieces of debris.

                    Well, i shall see what i can find to post next, i have not got anything lined up, so give me a while to find something.
                    It is quite an active volcanic area with some active and some dormant volcanoes. In fact Gunung Bromo and Gunung Batok is two active volcanoes that lies within a very large "dead" crater. If you got to Google Earth you can clearly see the outline of this large crater.
                    In your first picture you see both of those, with Gunung Semuru in the background, which is regularly erupting.

                    Flying to/from Bali and Singapore the route goes fairly close to these volcanoes. Sometime the tops stick up through the cloud cover and the smoke or ash is clearly visible by day and sometime lava flow at night.
                    It is a majestic sight.

                    I know of only one place with an active volcano inside the rim of another volcano. That is at Rabaul on New Britain, PNG. There the outer rim has collapsed and the old crater is flooded, with a new cone in the middle.
                    The old crater is forming a very protected harbour, used as a major Japanese Naval Base during WWII. Many Japanese ships were sunk there in one of the major Naval Battles of the War in the Pacific. Lots of stories from there, but this is not the place for it.

                    Comment


                      Now lets see how long this one will last before it is solved. I guess you would need to discover what this structure is before you can progress.

                      I am looking for both the name of this structure, and of course, where it is to be found.

                      What place is this?
                      Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                      Comment


                        Hint, looking at the surroundings may help you identify what this structure is.
                        Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                        Comment


                          To narrow it down a bit, am I right saying that it could be somewhere in the larger British Isles... as in Scotland?
                          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

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                            British Isles yes, but not Scotland. Identifying what this structure is will play a big part in helping to solve this puzzle.
                            Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
                              ....Identifying what this structure is will play a big part in helping to solve this puzzle.
                              Oh, could it possibly be part of a bridge?

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by Seagull View Post
                                Oh, could it possibly be part of a bridge?
                                Not a bridge Cecilia, though you are extremely close, what's the opposite to a bridge?
                                Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                                Comment

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