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    darn,you beat me,that was my guess also
    best regards Thijs

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      Quite Brilliant, you two!! Yes!! AJ's godfather Andy arranged a private tour for us, and it was absolutely FASCINATING!!! Once I get my photos organized, I will share the amazing tour with y'all...

      I have become a Brunel -ophile...or want to be. So much of his work is in Bristol (and if you haven't gone to Bristol, you SHOULD!!! I can't wait to go back!) and he was so amazingly clever.... The way the SS Great Britain is preserved is ingenious as well. for a little preview, look HERE

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        Oh the guilt! – I’ve been there twice in as many years and seem to have completely forgotten to post any pictures other than a detail of the hull in an old-forum photo competition on the subject “Old/Aged”.

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          Originally posted by Seagull View Post
          Oh the guilt! – I’ve been there twice in as many years and seem to have completely forgotten to post any pictures...........
          And i feel really guilty because i have never visited, even though i only live an hour and a half away from Bristol.
          Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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            I'm still waiting for the location and description of the Asian fireballs.

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              Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
              I'm still waiting for the location and description of the Asian fireballs.
              Me too, i simply cannot solve that one. I have a feeling it will not be solved, so maybe Ombugge could consider spilling the beans about the fireball, and then post another puzzle?
              Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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                Does it have something to do when a pocket of methane gas gets released as a result of something like an earthquake?????

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                  Originally posted by ehp View Post
                  Does it have something to do when a pocket of methane gas gets released as a result of something like an earthquake?????
                  Sorry, I've been outstation for a few days so not able to follow up here, but it looks like Lady E has kept the flame going, so to speak. (Pun intended)

                  Yes it is methane released by a natural phenomena, but what could ignite it?
                  Since y'all now have a new clue, curtesy of our Sourthern Girl, I'm not going to reveal the answer just yet.
                  Maybe tomorrow, if nobody manage to get the right description of the "fireball" at least.

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                    Are they like the Naga fireballs on the Mekong River, that are produced by fermentation of river sediment????? This seems a LOT bigger than those, though...

                    Lightning??????
                    Last edited by ehp; June 29th, 2010, 04:45.

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                      Originally posted by ehp View Post
                      Are they like the Naga fireballs on the Mekong River, that are produced by fermentation of river sediment????? This seems a LOT bigger than those, though...

                      Lightning??????
                      I started to get a little excited when i also first read about Naga fireballs, i really thought i was getting close. But then, like you Elizabeth, i noticed the very slight difference in size! I think i read they were described like small floating balls of light, on reading that i moved away from that idea.
                      Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by ehp View Post
                        Are they like the Naga fireballs on the Mekong River, that are produced by fermentation of river sediment????? This seems a LOT bigger than those, though...

                        Lightning??????
                        Definitely not the NAGA fireballs... those I have seen myself, and they don't come out at daytime, nor do they look like these!
                        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                        Comment


                          It looks like everybody has thrown in the towel on this one.
                          The phenomena is described as a Mud Volcano, although it is not actually a Volcano in the true sense. No lava flow involved, but gas trapped below ground breaking though the the rock or sand above and releasing into the atmosphere at very high velocity.
                          In this case it must be Methane, due to the large fireball and clean burning flame, but in other areas it can also be CO2, and/or a mix of several naturally occurring gases, both combustible and inert.

                          This particular eruption happened in May, 2008 on Ramlee Island, off the Arakan Coast, Burma. This is one of the original oil fields in Burma, which was the start of Burma Oil. (Now BP) The early prospectors for oil used natural seepage of oil and gas and small mud volcanoes as an indicator of where to drill.

                          Eruptions are still frequently caused by drilling activities, but can also be triggered by earthquake, or simply spontaneously due to a build-up of formation pressure.

                          The Naga Fireballs are likely Methane bubbling up from the bottom, but what cause them to ignite? Many theories exists, as it does re: this much larger fireball. Could it be spontaneous ignition due to static electricity as the gas move through the formation, or some other source?

                          As to why the Naga Balls can only be seen at night, it is obviously because they are not bright enough to be seen in daylight.

                          Why they occur on a specific Buddhist sacred day may be because there are thousand of people waiting to observe them on that day, while otherwise it is a non-event for the local people, who have their own interpretation and belief.
                          Fire breathing Serpent is probably not a realistic explanation though.

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                            I do not think i would have ever guessed that one correctly. But, just to show it could have been easily solved with the correct words inputted into google, look what i found on the very first page of a google image search when i used the words "mud volcano explosion".

                            http://www.narinjara.com/details.asp?id=1760

                            Well Ombugge, you are the first to set a puzzle that beat us. So feel free to sit back with a contented grin on your face, and a nice bottle of beer in your hand!

                            (But before you get too settled, your going to have to post another puzzle!)
                            Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                            Comment


                              Well, I don't know if "beating you" is something to celebrate, but I'll have a beer anyhow.

                              I stumbled upon the picture when searching for info on early drilling activity on the Arakan Coast. (Not at the same site but with the same mistaken text about "lava flow" etc.
                              Apparently eruption of this particular Mud Volcano is a fairly regular occurrence. It even has a name, Nagar Gri (Dragon).

                              I was on the Arakan Coast in 1975 with the first offshore rig to drill in that area, the "Hakuryu IV", a Japanese Rig (JDC) drilling for Nippon Oil.
                              Later in 1975 and -76 I was attending an American Rig drilling for Exxon off the Irrawaddy Delta and in the Rangoon River mouth.

                              At that time Burma was a closed country, with all kinds of restrictions for entry, especially travelling to places other than approved tourist sites on guided tours.

                              I never saw any Mud Volcano eruptions, but the first Exxon rig to drill in Burmese water (1972 or -73) hit shallow gas, which caused a blow-out that broke through the formation outside the casing. (See discussion on this subject in the DW Horizon thread) That can be described as a man-made Mud Volcano.
                              It created a cratered in the seabed, which eventually caused the rig to tip over and disappear into the crater.

                              I'll have to take some time to come up with a puzzle to match this one.
                              Last edited by ombugge; July 1st, 2010, 09:24.

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                                I didn't have any time to spend solving the last puzzle –too many other things on the go –but if I had, I doubt if I would have come up with mud volcano given the size of the “fireball” in the photo.

                                Definitions of the term mud volcano always hasten to point out that it is a gas release phenomena and not a volcano in the sense of an eruption of lava.
                                But now looking at Steve’s link, there is the suggestion that in this particular case there was an actual volcano in the vicinity, and molten lava is mentioned!

                                If this is so, then perhaps it was this hot lava that ignited the methane gas to produce the vastly bigger explosion than is normally associated with mud volcanos in the area.

                                Ah Ombugge, this post just crossed with your last edit of yours . . .
                                So if there isn't any molten lava here, then I'm back to wondering about the ignition and sheer size of the "fireball" again!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                                What a puzzle - this one could run and run....
                                Last edited by Seagull; July 1st, 2010, 10:01.

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