Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Train spotting around the world...

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #76
    Re: Train spotting around the world...

    Good stuff Steve. Related, but different, the 1938 Tube Stock, much of which spent most of its life on the Northern Line - a handful of trains have ended up remaining in service on the Isle of Wight Island Line.

    Here is one set seen at the weekend.

    This is what happens when you're standing on a railway overbridge watching the hovercraft when someone says "Look the other way, train!".



    At which point all you can do is to take the picture of the back of the train and hope no-one notices.



    Someone cleverer than me (Mrs PoloUK) managed to get a nicely composed shot. (There may just be one of you out there interested to know that the Point Machine is a Westinghouse Style M3 - maybe not that interesting, but more interesting is that the casting is labelled 'Westinghouse Brake & Saxby Signal Co' - a name that was changed to Westinghouse Brake & Signal in 1935 - making that a very old lump of in-service engineering!)



    After Ryde station, the train toddles out along Ryde Pier (681m) - with its station and the Wight Ryder fast catamaran service to Portsmouth at the end. The train's on its way back at this point - and I'm getting wet - and the autofocus has a fascination with the railings rather than the train.

    Cheers,

    Mark.

    www.pologlover.co.uk

    Comment


    • #77
      Re: Train spotting around the world...

      Fantastic to see some of the old Island Line 1938 stock on here! I know the island very well, so am familiar with the railways over there. I had to laugh when i read your comments about the old point machine, that is so typical of the railways on the island, their railways have always had to make do with second hand hand me downs when it comes to allsorts of equipment. It would not surprise me to learn that the point machine was probably originally installed somewhere around the south London area many decades ago.

      Nice photos, Mark. And nice to see that the tunnel was not flooded by all the rain we have had recently, that tunnel is a bit prone to flooding.


      Julian Winslow


      Alan Martin

      I should imagine that these 1938 stock units must be very near to the end of their useful life now, at over 70 years old they have done well. Do you remember the stock used previously on the island, the 1926 stock units? They were retired from service in the mid 80's - a service life of 60 years, so this current batch must really be showing their age at 70+ years.

      I do wonder what the future holds for the island line, will they get some more second hand cast off's from the underground? (I know that a lot of the old 1961 stock recently retired from service on the underground - i wonder if any have been put aside for future use on the island?), or will the railway become a light railway instead? I personally think that the tram option will be very expensive, so maybe we will see yet another generation of ex underground units finding their way to the island. I hope so, for my entire life i have known the island with ex underground trains running on it.

      All of this reminds me i have my own 'Isle of Wight Steam Railways' thread that i have not touched for a few years, i really must get on with it and carry on with the story of all the lines on the island.

      http://www.captainsvoyage-forum.com/...of-Wight-Steam
      Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

      Comment


      • #78
        Re: Train spotting around the world...

        Glug, glug, glug. Some fun photos of the flooding here too:

        http://www.iwcp.co.uk/news/news/floo...ght-46605.aspx

        http://www.iwcp.co.uk/news/news/high...ces-46611.aspx

        The ferries having trouble because of too much water!!

        Interestingly Wikipedia is suggesting that some of the '67 Tube Stock recently retired from the Vic Line has turned up at Eastleigh - with the suggestion it may end up on the island. Will be interesting to see what happens.
        Cheers,

        Mark.

        www.pologlover.co.uk

        Comment


        • #79
          Re: Train spotting around the world...

          Originally posted by PoloUK View Post
          Glug, glug, glug. Some fun photos of the flooding here too:

          http://www.iwcp.co.uk/news/news/floo...ght-46605.aspx

          http://www.iwcp.co.uk/news/news/high...ces-46611.aspx

          The ferries having trouble because of too much water!!

          Interestingly Wikipedia is suggesting that some of the '67 Tube Stock recently retired from the Vic Line has turned up at Eastleigh - with the suggestion it may end up on the island. Will be interesting to see what happens.
          I was reading those very news pages last night! I always keep my eye on the Isle of Wight County Press.

          Very interesting to hear about the 67 stock turning up at Eastleigh, in the past all stock destined for the island came via the Eastleigh depot. And at just over 40 years old they would fit in perfectly with the past transfers to the island.
          Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

          Comment


          • #80
            Re: Train spotting around the world...

            Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
            All of this reminds me i have my own 'Isle of Wight Steam Railways' thread that i have not touched for a few years, i really must get on with it and carry on with the story of all the lines on the island.
            Oh Steve, the number of times recently that I have thought of asking you about your thread, and if you were up to resuming it. Then I would think, no, perhaps he might not feel like it, knowing what you said about having lost the discs and having to retrieve material from your father's place. You have set it out so beautifully and I loved reading through it when I first joined. It would be so good if you could now add to it.
            Ivy

            "To thine own self be true.......
            Thou canst not then be false to any man."

            Comment


            • #81
              Re: Train spotting around the world...

              I was at Edinburgh’s Waverley Station to meet someone yesterday when I saw a train that could fit just as well in an aircraft thread! Just as I was going to take more photos it set off.
              The plaque says:
              Battle of Britain Memorial Flight
              Spitfire Hurricane Lancaster Dakota



              Comment


              • #82
                Trams seen in Gothenburg, Sweden




                Liseberglinjen.

                Øistein

                If at first you don’t succeed, skydiving is not for you...

                Comment


                • #83
                  There is certainly a whole lot more CHARM in older trams when compared to new and modern one's.
                  With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                  Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                  Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                  Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                  Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                  Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    No I haven't spotted any trains, but an article about train delays in Norway: http://www.vg.no/forbruker/jernbanen...ag/a/23411752/
                    Signal problems??? This must be a job for Superman a.k.a. Mark.

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Not going to make any specific comments! I've only ever worked on the T-bane network in Oslo, although I was involved in chasing work on the big railway - but many years ago.

                      What I would comment on is the way that these things interact. We have the same thing here in this country where 'signal failure' scores highly in the number of delay minutes caused. There are a number of reasons for that, for example:

                      Signalling systems are designed to fail-safe. That means that if anything goes wrong, the railway will be brought to a stop. The signalling systems that the industry provides are created to a higher level of safety design than even nuclear power systems. In fact the central processing units - the interlockings - from all the major suppliers tend to go wrong very, very infrequently.

                      The bits in our world that can go wrong tend to be:

                      (a) Points and Point machines - the big chunky machines that move sets of points to route trains in one direction or the other. The machines themselves can go wrong, or get bits of ballast stuck, or have wires cut - that will normally go down as being a signalling fault.

                      (b) Train detection - the systems that work out where trains are - again have to 'fail safe' - so if anything goes wrong, trains will have to stop. That can be as simple as the trackbed getting wet - or again the lovely civil engineers knocking a wire off whilst they're doing essential maintenance. Again that counts as a signalling failure.

                      (c) Power - that's a big one. The signalling and remote control systems obviously need power. Many (but not all) of them have back up power supplies or fall back systems - but if you're controlling an object 20 miles from anywhere, there's not a lot you can do about it. Some of Norway's problems are actually related to earthing issues - not helped by the granite and ground conditions under much of the railway. There are plenty of failure modes where - once detected - to keep the railway safe it is essential to stop trains.

                      (d) Communications - old technology is large lumps of copper wire running alongside the track providing power and interconnection between systems. These are extremely attractive to the less savoury members of our communities, and have a tendency to disappear. Replacing stolen cabling is a massive challenge and can't be done quickly - remembering that everything has to be tested to be safe once replacement is complete. New technology is ethernet style networked backbones. These are hugely reliable - and glass fibre isn't worth much at the scrapyard - but in the unlikely event that failure does occur, large chunks of railway can be taken out.
                      There are ways of overcoming these things - and there's a lot of work going into this as the underlying systems get more and more reliable. In the UK for example the number of points-related failures has pretty much halved in recent years. This comes from careful maintenance and 'remote condition monitoring' -adding new equipment to 'watch' how the points move and determine when they look like they're starting to go wrong. Train detection is moving to new technology which is rather more immune to the failure modes of old systems (but has some downsides too).

                      There's a lot to all of this - what I've said above only scratches the surface. What is certainly the case is that running railways is nothing like as simple as it appears.
                      Cheers,

                      Mark.

                      www.pologlover.co.uk

                      Comment


                      • wherrygirl
                        wherrygirl commented
                        Editing a comment
                        In my rare musings on British railways I never have thought it simple, but your account of just some of what is involved is really interesting, Mark. Thank you.

                    • #86
                      Further to the above: http://www.vg.no/forbruker/jernbanen...on/a/23426846/

                      And here is somebody who has the solution to the problem, a politician and the minister responsible for the railways in Norway no less:
                      http://www.vg.no/forbruker/jernbanen...er/a/23431402/

                      Comment


                      • #87
                        Delayed trains is the everyday problem for all commuters in Sweden, especially around Stockholm. An advice: don't rely on the train time table when coming to Stockholm, you will probably be late anyway. I would never even think of taking the train to Arlanda airport, that's a good way to miss your flight.

                        Comment


                        • #88
                          I don't know about you, but this sounds a bit old fashion: http://www.vg.no/forbruker/jernbanen...at/a/23433674/
                          Last edited by ombugge; April 17th, 2015, 04:00.

                          Comment


                          • #89
                            I'm still not a train spotter, but I spotted these pictures of trains and railways in China on CNN's website: http://edition.cnn.com/2015/05/31/tr...phy/index.html

                            It has everything, from old steam locs to high speed trains and in all kinds of locations throughout the wast rail network in China.
                            Besides, the picture quality should meet with approval by the discerning photo buffs here on CVF. (I hope?)

                            Some may be aware that China is the leader in High Speed Train technology, has the largest network and the fastest train in the world.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X