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  • Greenlanders

    I don’t think I have ever been on a trip, camera in hand, where I took quite so many photographs of people as I did on my recent voyage along the west coast of Greenland. That kind of subject isn’t something I am usually attracted to. But the lives and culture of the people I encountered in Greenland are as memorable and remarkable as any mountain or iceberg, or even my first experience of seeing a polar bear! And so I thought that I would emphasize this aspect of my travels by contributing to this section, even though my intentions don’t exactly fit with the Directions and Guidance given here – “interviews” are not always possible where there is not a common language, and time may be limited even when there is – there were TV crews making a documentary and other professional photo journalists aboard Fram on this voyage.
    So although I will try to put the pictures into context, this will be for the most part a pictorial account.

  • #2
    Sisimiut

    The first landing on any voyage is always especially exciting, and my arrival in Sisimiut was no exception.
    “Don’t worry if you forget to take your museum entrance ticket – there will be someone there with a list of Fram’s passengers so you will still get free entrance to the museum”.
    – just one piece of information for us on our first landing from Fram in Greenland! We had already been provided with a map and had attended a helpful briefing about the general layout of the town, places of interest, optional excursions and hikes, as well as practical details (for those without Danish kroner it might be the last opportunity for some time to visit a bank).

    The Museum was for sure a good place to start – although I had lingered for a long time down by the port area and harbour before heading uphill to the colourful group of wooden buildings dating from the colonial period. These buildings house a number of displays of various kinds, both permanent collections and temporary changing exhibits.


    Here I would like to show you some photos of an exhibition of ethnic masks. As I took them I was already thinking they might be an appropriate start for posting in People of the World on CaptainsVoyage.



    Further along the road after visiting museum and both old and new churches, I was back in the present century, and amongst present day Greenlanders going about their shopping and banking in the familiar surroundings of modern day living – though this town, big by Greenlandic standards, is sufficiently small that there’s a strong likelihood of them meeting friends and acquaintances.



    As I continued my leisurely exploration I soon came across reminders that the success of this community is based on fishing.




    Hunting too is a means of making a living.



    Back near the harbour, there is time for a break . . .


    . . . and the older men enjoy the warm sunshine and a chat.






    And so it is time to depart, and, back aboard Fram, we tourists are treated to an enthusiastic display of kayaking by two other inhabitants of Sisimiut!

    Comment


    • #3
      Heeeeeeyyy!!!

      What a nice surprise after lunch...
      I look forward to a fantastic report with Seagulls view of people and things.

      Great. Can't wait for your next posts...
      Last edited by Ralf__; November 4th, 2009, 16:27.
      Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

      Comment


      • #4
        Delighted you enjoyed it Ralf!
        Well, there will be more – and as I explained in Fram’s pages, I felt my experiences in Greenland were less “single trip report” and more a mix of impressions – so you will have to keep alert! Could pop up anywhere, anytime!!!! And I am beginning to realise that in the process I might even help revitalise some sections and threads in our good ship “CaptainsVoyage”!

        Comment


        • #5
          Excellent thread.... these 'Greenlanders' kind of remind me of Asians, but with an Indian twist.

          It's also quite interesting to see that they are almost custom made for both the climate and light conditions of their homeland. Fascinating to see and learn more and more each day - posts like this adds a great new flavour to all of us and our home...
          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

          Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
          Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
          Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
          Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

          Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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          • #6
            Qeqertarsuaq

            Perhaps because I spent a lot of time playing happily on my own when I was young, I like to see a child who seems content with his or her own company. This little boy seemed proud of his new bike, and I sensed that it had brought many previously unexplored parts of the town within his reach. He would peddle along in a determined manner, carefully avoiding the more major potholes and other obstacles, then pause for a while, intently observing this and that.




            Much the same could be said about this lone footballer, kicking a ball around a deserted pitch at the edge of the town. Concentrating on footwork and controlling the ball, he would then turn carefree and playful for a while. Behind him is the sea where majestic blue icebergs drift slowly by.







            Last edited by Seagull; November 27th, 2009, 22:01.

            Comment


            • #7
              Qeqertarsuaq



              Between welcoming visitors and attending to the sale of books and postcards, the museum keeper at Qeqertarsuaq sat studying a small book with a look of intense concentration. It turned out to be a short English grammar and vocabulary. Perhaps that was one reason why he seemed so delighted to chat for a while, trying out his new language skills, for the majority of his visitors that day would have been German. I guess he was also pleased that I had purchased a book, not merely a postcard or leaflet. Entitled “A hunter’s Life in Olden Days”, it reproduces some of the pencil drawings and watercolours of Jakob Danielsen who died at the age of 50 in the year 1938. These deceptively simple images and accompanying diary-like descriptions record a way of life that was starting to change.
              I asked the museum keeper about some details of the scenes depicted, and he spoke also of life since Danielsen’s time.
              What an interesting end to the afternoon - I was glad that I had planned to visit the museum last, for I was able to linger right up to the last few trips of the Polar Cirkel boats and Fram’s departure.

              Comment


              • #8
                The image of the boy playing ball with the iceberg in the background is absolutely first class awesome! I love it!

                You have such a great talent Lady C and it's such an amazing thrill to read your writing! Each time I see a new post from you, I get so exited!
                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Uummannaq

                  From young to old, from hunting to fishing, from work to relaxation, just a few images of the people of Uummannaq.




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                  • #10



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                    • #11



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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Seagull View Post
                        From young to old, from hunting to fishing, from work to relaxation, just a few images of the people of Uummannaq.

                        Now tell, me what kind of fish is this spotted fish?
                        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                        Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                        Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by pakarang View Post
                          Now tell, me what kind of fish is this spotted fish?
                          I’m not really sure.
                          I actually asked an old man who was also watching when I took that photo, but the older people don’t always know English and my Danish (errrrr, Skåne Swedish!!!!!) doesn’t stretch to such vocabulary! In any case the Greenlanders use their own words for the various fish. Identification of fish, birds and flowers in travels abroad is always a problem unless perhaps in a museum with the unambiguous scientific names.

                          This looks somewhat cod-shaped but longer and seems to have more distinct spots and markings, but then there are many unusual species in these Arctic waters.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by pakarang View Post
                            Now tell, me what kind of fish is this spotted fish?
                            I think it's this one:
                            Smaller catfish

                            In Norwegian: Flekksteinbit, English: Smaller catfish (Spotted wolffish) Latin: Anarhichas minor Olafsen
                            Øistein

                            If at first you don’t succeed, skydiving is not for you...

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                            • #15
                              That’s it! Another question answered by CVForum –Oistein you are brilliant - big thank you .

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