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Lady C's Thailand

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  • Seagull
    started a topic Lady C's Thailand

    Lady C's Thailand

    The promised new thread from Seagull starts here!

    Not trip reports, but all sorts of bits and pieces and hopefully regular posting of my images past and furure to please our Captain, to whom the thread is naturally dedicated.

    For the next few days while we are still surrounded by festive decorations, I'm going to feature those outside Central World shopping mall in Bangkok.



  • Seagull
    replied
    Today I am remembering that it is exactly two years since the passing of King Bhumibol Adulyadej - Rama IX - on the 13th October 2016.
    So it is perhaps an appropriate time to continue this thread with gradual posting of images taken in November of last year - following the year of mourning and the funeral, and before the dismantling of the Royal Crematorium at the Sanam Luang ceremonial grounds according to Thai tradition.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    My Bangkok, my Bangkok. I have so many memories from you: good and bad. But I remember only the good one's.

    PS: Still remember the traffic, the heat, the noise and all those security guards blowing a whistle in your ear.... LOL

    I saw that article in Bangkok Post too (the "Bridging times and cities"). Very interesting and usually well composed. As I still have another two years of subscription to Bangkok Post e-edition, I keep on reading that paper every morning as my morning ritual.

    I can't afford reading the local paper Address for Trondheim, but I can afford the Bangkok Post. LOL. I'm so strange.

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  • Seagull
    replied


    Traffic is building up on Rama IV Road at the time of day this photograph was taken.

    The land on Wireless road opposite the park is about to be developed as mega-project "One Bangkok", described as "Thailand's largest integrated development, set to transform Bangkok city-centre and become a new global landmark destination".



    To end with, a night view along Rama IV Road

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  • Seagull
    replied


    Hazy light and taken through double glazed bedroom windows from the hotel, but clearly showing the flyover bridge. In fact the pedestrian crossing on the old photo before the assembly of the bridge is still there, and can be seen on my photo. What I don't have are any photos taken at ground level, though I frequently crossed beneath the flyover to reach the corner entrance to the park.







    A view of the flyover looking in the opposite direction along Rama IV Road and Lumphini Park

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  • Seagull
    replied


    The hotel seen from the corner entrance to Lumphini Park




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  • Seagull
    replied
    “Bridging times and cities”

    Earlier this month I came across a link to an article in Bangkok Post, the title "Bridging times and cities" grabbing my attention.
    One of the two cities mentioned was, unsurprisingly, Bangkok. The other turned out to be the Belgian capital Brussels where a bridge to aid traffic flow had been designed to be rapidly assembled in time for the famous World Expo in 1958. The viaduct then remained in use until the early 1980s when it was replaced by a tunnel and the disassembled structure stored away.

    The newspaper article goes on to explain the fascinating story of how the bridge came to be given to Thailand and reconstructed in Bangkok in April 1988 as a much-needed urban flyover at a frequently gridlocked intersection.

    It's a remarkable story of how an individual's idea took root, came to fruition, and subsequently influenced urban development. A story of diplomacy, engineering, an astonishing construction deadline, a Royal opening, anniversary celebrations... oh and I nearly forgot to mention shipping transportation! Do read it for yourself :-
    https://www.bangkokpost.com/lifestyl...mes-and-cities

    When I first read the article, I hadn't immediately realised where the Bangkok location (described as "the Witthayu - Rama IV - Sathon intersection") actually was, until scrolling back to the photograph at the beginning of the article. Of course! ...the trees in the bottom left are a corner of Lumphini Park; Witthayu Road (more familiar as Wireless Road in English) continues at an angle across Rama IV Road as Sathorn (also spelt Sathon) Road, and the triangular shaped junction of Sathorn with Rama IV, bottom right on the photo, is today the location of the high rise, trendy 'designer hotel' SO Sofitel where I have stayed on two occasions.

    So of course I had to search my photo files for any relevant views!

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  • pakarang
    replied
    Ahhhh.... Bangkok, a city that will forever stay in my heart and a city where I have so many, many, many memories - good and bad!

    Once Bangkok gets under your skin, you'll never be able to leave. I agree! Each time I see a photo of places I have seen, so many memories comes back to mind.

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  • Seagull
    replied
    But for now it was time to continue along 'my side' of the canal to reach Thews Pier from where I could go along the river by boat back to where I was staying at the Hilton Millenium Hotel.






    A last look at the end of the canal at the locks shows the vegetation that they had been keeping keeping under control...



    ...and finally I’'ll end this walk with a view of the impressive cable stay bridge across the Chao Phraya river - the Rama VIII Bridge.

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  • Seagull
    replied


    Looking down at the other side of the bridge, the last on the canal, is a landing stage for boats




    Ahead are the locks and the Chao Phraya river. I was fortunate to see a boat exiting the lock - I later realised they had been clearing vegetation along the riverbank.



    A glimpse of the market across the bridge. Another time it would be interesting to linger here...

    ...and find the way to the temple whose glorious spire I'd glimpsed through the foliage.




    Indeed such explorations would bring me to the Dusit area. The canal I'd spent the day walking along is actually quite close at one point to a favourite temple, Wat Benchamabophit, which I've always approached in the other direction from the Skytrain.

    Gradually with each visit, the jigsaw pieces of ‘My Bangkok’ are fitting together into a bigger picture.

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  • Seagull
    replied


    Resuming my walk, Wat Noranartsoontarikaram stretches some length the along the side of Krung Kasem Road, while the canal side is open space that appears to have been recently cleared. Looking at Google Street View it is lined with low buildings and market stalls. One can't 100% believe some of the dates Google gives, but in this instance May 2017, six months earlier than my visit, may well be likely. Farther along near the next bridge, street view actually shows some demolished rubble.







    Looking back and zooming in from the next bridge, this photo shows the cleared space on one side of the canal. The wall of the temple is glimpsed on the extreme right of this photo.

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  • Seagull
    replied
    I'd spotted another brown board and headed for it, crossing the road from the temple to the canal side and before taking a photo of Wisukam Narueman Bridge. The board explained that the bridge, opened in 1901, had been ordered by King Rama V, and was initially an iron structure with a wooden pavement and cast iron blustrade. It was restored and reconstructed in reinforced concrete in in 1967. Certainly an essential improvent for today's traffic!







    Continuing energetically along a straight stretch of canal, I approach the next major road bridge. To the left of of the photo, the bridge takes the traffic along Samsun Road, and on the corner I spotted a suitable place to sit a while and enjoy a snack and drink.




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  • pakarang
    replied
    Oh, lord... a bridge galore!

    So wonderful to see Bangkok again - I will be returning soon to, I guess that bucket list thing has gotten stuck on a few places that I keep returning to, and I still want to return to. Hong Kong is one, and Thailand (in general) is another one. There is more than enough to see, despite having lived for decades in one of those places.

    The age of the overhead wires in Bangkok are luckily about to end. Sukhumwit Road is one of the first streets to have these underground - a mammoth task for a city like BKK if you ask me, but also a completely necessary things to have done.

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  • Seagull
    replied


    Looking across to a junction with another canal.





    Next is another major intersection – the bridge at Ratchadamoen Nok Road, actually a trio of bridges with complicate traffic circulation. It's therefore a bit tiresome for pedestrians too, so back on track I think I deserve a short pause at a temple, the full name of which is Wat Makut Kasattriyaram Ratchaworawithan. It is a Royal Temple built by order of King Rama IV after the canal Phadung Krung Kasem had been dug as the outer city moat. This follows the tradition at Ayutthaya of having temples built along the canals around the city.










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  • Seagull
    replied


    I walk more quickly now until I reach the next rather elegant bridge at the intersection with Nakan Sawan Road.




    The buildings along that road are also attractive, but on this walk I'm really focussed on continuing beside the canal.





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