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Lady C's Thailand

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    #76
    Indeed, the late King, was indeed devoted a whole lifetime to cultivate and irrigate the entire country, especially the poorer NE-region.

    There was a deep and profound passion in making sure the country prospered and did something with the problems politicians only discussed.
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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      #77
      In one of the pavilions, there was a tribute to those Royal-initiated projects in an exhibition of paintings.


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        #78



        Many captions were in both Thai and English. I noted that this one depicts "“Dam to retain water for use in times of scarcity. Pasak Jolasid Dam, Lopburi Province.”"

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          #79


          Solar and wind energy generation, water pumping, irrigation and treatment of waste water were just some of the many subjects illustrated.

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            #80


            This one attracted my attention:- "The Royal Rain solved the problem of drought at Khao Yai National Park."

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              #81


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                #82
                As I would have said in Thai.... "SATU".... meaning "Amen".

                I have actually been to Pasak Jolasid Dam way back in history... I don't remember what it looked like without finding the photos I took there (if any).
                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                Comment


                #83
                Continuing these posts of images from November 2017.
                .

                Last edited by Seagull; January 29th, 2019, 21:39.

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                  #84
                  There were hardly any foreigners waiting to enter Sanam Luang to visit the Royal Crematorium and exhibitions that day - no apparent separate entrance, and I had even been handed a leaflet in Thai language. Perhaps my appropriate dress and familiarity with the arrangements - similar to those in 2016 for mourners waiting to pay respects before the funeral urn at the Grand Palace - contributed to my feeling of togetherness with the Thai people.



                  Outside the covered waiting area, you can glimpse large numbers of school children that had been admitted earlier, and there were many and various smaller groups also.









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                    #85






                    People patiently queued to enter the major exhibition "The King in Everlasting Memory".. (This is additional to the paintings of royal projects I posted earlier, which were housed in one of the smaller pavilions.)





                    Later while I was viewing the exhibition, the skies darkened and it began to rain quite heavily, sending people scurrying for shelter or lingering in the pavilions and exhibition. This rather compromised the throughput of visitors, and looking around I realised that I was now surrounded by people wearing different coloured badges to those issued at the time I had arrived. An older official, perhaps noticing this or simply respectful of a white-haired lady and keen to practice his English, kindly assured me that I needn't hurry, and moreover would indeed be welcome to return. And that is what I did a couple of days later, and my images here are a mixture from both days.
                    Last edited by Seagull; January 29th, 2019, 21:43.

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                      #86
                      Oh, what a wonderful and welcome return to images from my beloved country.

                      Quite sad to hear about the current pollution issues over there.

                      I have always loved the rainy days, the monsoon and rainy season, in Thailand.... everything feels so much fresher and the air is clearer. Perhaps those days are something of the past?
                      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                      Comment


                      • Seagull
                        Seagull commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Pakarang, I enjoy those kinds of rainy days too, but I don't think such days are past. However already-apparent changes in climate could increasingly bring typhoons, heavier rain and flooding, as well as the other extreme of dry periods and droughts to Southeast Asia. In Thailand, I hope the legacy of the late king will continue to foster the bigger picture, and counterbalance any drift to rushed ill-thought-out decisions and short-term solutions.

                      #87



                      After the rain, I loved the light and the dramatic skies.



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                        #88



                        Earlier I had noticed a couple of photographers taking reflections in the small water lily pond at the corner of the main exhibition hall, though when I tried to emulate them it proved difficult to be unobtrusive and compose an image there amongst such crowds of people.






                        But after the heavy rain the reflections I loved the most were those in the wet pavements between the pavilions - a feeling of floating and another dimension.


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                          #89
                          That feeling about the water seemed to me to be such an appropriate introduction to the Royal Crematorium - Phra Meru Mas - itself. Here a model in one of the exhibitions and you can see that the tiered structure representing Mount Meru (Sumeru) has a pond at its base. The Anodat Pond is a mystical pond of the Himmapan forest, a border separating Heaven and Earth.









                          Here is a corner of the representation of the Himmapan, and next will follow a selection of more detailed images.

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                            #90


                            Bordering the Anodat pond are artificial rocks amongst which nestles real foliage, and from which occasional bursts of misty spray recreate the humid forest.

                            As you might expect, elephants figure prominently, whether as a sacred White Elephant or depicted with other auspicious animals in colourful sculptures.





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