Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Norway from the air.

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    Re: Norway from the air.

    Thank you. I like getting lost while looking at that photo. I guess I was lucky to be on the right side of the plane at the right time. This was my first sight of Svalbard, the trip was starting quite well...

    Comment


    • #62
      Re: Norway from the air.

      Absolutely exquisite, and yes I too thought a painting. It’s amazing how the weather conditions have reduced the landscape to its essentials, (and as such could even serve as an example in drawing lessons!)
      You could print it and frame it and look at it all the time.

      On my recent flight the visibility conditions were clear and sharp, nice in a different way but loosing much of the magic and other-worldliness of yours.

      (Oh and apologies all, I completely forgot we had a separate thread for Norway from the Air when I posted recently in Views of the world from aircraft windows! )

      Comment


      • #63
        Re: Norway from the air.

        Print it could be a good idea actually! Thanks for the tip

        Comment


        • #64
          FLYING over the mountains heading for Tromso. and then leaving Tromso



          travelling from Tromso


          past cruises 2000 ncl crown odessey mediterranean 2006 ncl marco polo baltic 2007 ncl marco polo mediterranean... june 2010 pacific princess, mediterranean . may 2011 island princess alaska . june 2015 NCL Star Norwegian Fjords

          Comment


          • #65
            Have a look at this PANORAMIC shot taken from the Stegastein view-platform high above AURLAND.... you won't regret it.

            Takes a short while to load but is well worth the wait.

            http://www.visitnorway.com/360/fjell...fjellogfjord41
            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
            Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
            Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

            Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

            Comment


            • #66
              Well, maybe not quite from the air, but not quite sure where else to put this link to some wonderful 'tilt-shift' (ish) video of Norway and Iceland.

              http://www.dagbladet.no/2015/01/04/t...isme/36973419/
              Cheers,

              Mark.

              www.pologlover.co.uk

              Comment


              • Tommi
                Tommi commented
                Editing a comment
                Nice realization of the tilt shift effect.

            • #67
              Here is a link to a wonderful collection "drone"-videos made by Norwegian broadcasting corporation, NRK, from the Trøndelag area:

              Støre Farm, Skogn

              Kornhøst (autumn farming)

              Nærøy

              Hysnes

              Steinkjer

              Egge kirke (Egge Church)

              Reins Kloster (Reins Monastery)

              Steinkjerselva vinter og sommer (the Steinkjer river during winter and summer)

              Inderøy fra lufta (Inderøy from the air)

              Se Malm fra luft (see Malm from the air)

              Se Namsen fra lufta (see the salmon river Namsen from the air)

              Stiklestad

              Mosvik

              http://www.nrk.no/trondelag/se-trond...fta-1.12189181
              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
              Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
              Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

              Comment


              • #68
                I've been a pilot from 1985 up until 2 1/2 years ago, when I decided my expences/usefulness budget went way out of line...., with a price pr. hour for an old Piper PA-28 reached NOK 1.350,-.

                Anyway, I'm still a member of the aero club, and today I got invited to ride along for a half an hour sightseeing by one of the pilots, owning a Cirrus SR20.
                This plane set aside everything I ever learned about flying of an older version private plane, as you could fly it like a Boeing 737 or any other big bird. You even had the back pressure against the seat on take-off and we adjusted and flew on % power rather than rpm. The plane had a three-blade variable pitch propeller, but no "blue handle" in c0ckpit. The plane adjusted everything by itself and it even had a resisting force built in when we reached 60 degrees bank. It forced you to level up..., a safety device so to say.

                Anyway, here are a few pictures from the flight :-)

                Getting ready to pull out of the new hangar and do walkaround pre-flight check


                A Sikorsky S-92 from CHC Helicopters took off to make yet another flight to an oilrig out in the ocean


                Cleared take-off runway 07 (Nope, the plane don't have a built in IFR training feature in the glass, the defroster has not yet done it's job ;-) )


                Flying over the Atlantic Road


                Passing the highest point on Averøy


                Passing Vadsteinsvik with the Vikaneset Motell down to the right and the city and airport in the distance
                "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                Comment


                • #69
                  Long finale 07 for a full stop landing


                  Same position but viewed through a 18mm lense


                  Over Vestbase on short finale. Landing speed in this plane is a little higher than the 70 knots I'm used to, as the book say 78 knots here


                  The horisontal PAPI-lights on each side of the runway show three red and one white, which indicates we are a notch too low. If on a perfect glidepath, it should show two red and two white.
                  (A simple little something to remember what the lights mean: If all is red, your dead. If all is white, you'll fly all night. Two red and two white, you're all right)


                  Well, this has been a great day in my life. Hope you are all ok and enjoy life wherever you are :-)
                  "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                  Comment


                  • nari
                    nari commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I liked all the photos - I recently learned about the red/white lights watching a program where, in a small plane about the size of the one above, the pilot suddenly dies and "leaves" the plane to his good friend beside him whoh has never flown a plane. Thanks to a large supportive team at the airport they had left from, and five attempts to get the two red and two white lights, he was almost at the end of his tether (he was 77) but managed to land.
                    After he recovered somewhat, he reckoned he was going to take flying lessons........

                  • yvneac
                    yvneac commented
                    Editing a comment
                    WOW..............

                • #70
                  Great photos Svein. Looks like you had a good day.

                  Was the Cirrus you flew in one of the ones that has, or at least can have, the parachute to save the whole airframe in the event of a big problem?
                  Cheers,

                  Mark.

                  www.pologlover.co.uk

                  Comment


                  • Sterkoder
                    Sterkoder commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Yes, this Cirrus I flew today had the parachute. A last resort of course, as you have good glide numbers (glideratio) in this aircraft and so can attemt to make an emergancy landing in one of the several hundreds of fields in the area.

                • #71
                  and we adjusted and flew on % power rather than rpm.
                  Svein, if it can be said without too much rigmarole, what does that mean?
                  A superb set of images, it must have been a great flight.
                  Ivy

                  "To thine own self be true.......
                  Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                  Comment


                  • #72
                    Thanks on your comment there
                    Now, to your question, let me see if I remember when I have to put words on it...

                    In a conventional piston engined airplane with a constant pitch propeller (the propeller blades can not be moved, and they are set in one particular pitch), we have around 2.750 RPM (Revolutions Per Minute) as a maximum power outtake on the engine, the RPM used on take-off. Then we look at the ASI (Airspeed Indicator) and rotate (lift the nose wheel) at 60 knots. We keep 2.750 RPM until passing 1.000 feet altitude above airport elevation, then reduce to climb RPM 2.300. In level cruise flight we usually use RPM 2.000, which gives +/- 105 knots in the old Piper PA-28.

                    In an airplane with a variable pitch propeller, the propeller blades varies pitch (angle of attack through the air in which it moves, thus producing different lift depending on the efficiency taken out of the propeller). Usually this is done by the pilot, and he/she is then flying with reference to engine manifold pressure and RPM.

                    The plane we flew yesterday, the Cirrus SR20, is so cleverly designed that it takes care of the propeller itself..., based on the throttle setting. Therefore they now use the % power to set the engine power outtake, not the engine RPM.
                    If the pilot set a certain powersetting, the propellerblades will automatically change their pitch to be most effective for that % power.

                    I hope this was understandable

                    (Remember: a propeller blade is nothing more than a small wing, with its wing profile, set in motion through the air by the engine. The pitch control (either done by the pilot or automatically) twist the blades so that they produce much lift or not so much lift. Compared to the main wings of an airplane where the pilot pull the stick back so that the wing profile in a way twist upwards to increase the angle of attack to the air around it and so gives greater lift. Pull stick forward and the angle of attack decreases and less lift is produced. The main wings are mounted solid on the plane, so they don't move. What moves, and makes the plane pivot around its pitch axe (lateral) is the elevator rudder placed on the aircraft tail. Making it difficult to follow? Google is also a good place to start, my friend)
                    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                    Comment


                    • Tommi
                      Tommi commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Thank you very much for explaining, some day I actually also will remember this.
                      And great pictures too, you surely had a great day up there!

                  • #73
                    Awesome fly-along and "tutorial" on the lights... I never thought about it and I infact learnt something new!

                    Must have been an awesome day and trip for you: to be up in the skies again!
                    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                    Comment


                    • #74
                      Thank you guys. Anything you wonder about in aviation, in air or on ground, just ask. I'll try to answer, as answering questions also keeps me up to date..., in a way
                      "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                      Comment


                      • #75
                        Stunning images from a bird's eye view, Svein
                        Thanks for a good explanation regarding landing lights on the landing strip and technical operation of the airplane.
                        Best wishes from
                        Bengt Domben

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X