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    Re: This is Norway - all places without their own thread.

    As weather does in all mountain areas (so please be aware if you ever visit a mountain area), weather changed in the blink of an eye.
    It went from near unlimited view to not seeing anything beyond 30 meters in 10 seconds.
    Unlike East Anglia, where if you are in the countryside you can see it steadily approaching from miles away.
    Ivy

    "To thine own self be true.......
    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

    Comment


      Re: This is Norway - all places without their own thread.

      Oh YES! The conquest of Reinsfjellet (third time lucky!) . Laughter aside, I really am impressed by your fitness these days . The thunderstorm must indeed have been both frightening and awe-inspiring at the same time. Wise words about the rapidity of changing weather. Folk get into difficulty on Scotland’s mountains every year, setting out on a nice day in shorts and fashionable type of trainers totally ill-equipped for rocky sections of the route, changes in temperature and sudden storms, and so easily becoming disorientated in cloud and fog.

      Very impressive photography of the landscape and changing skies. I liked the feeling of walking the uphill track in #173/6 (perhaps wondering what will be revealed around the corner!). The radio amateurs’ hut is a delight in every way. Also so interesting to see the masts up close and the old and new contrasts.

      I very much like the images where there is that low cloud swirling around the base of the masts.

      As if all this wasn’t pleasure enough, you go on to show me a hydro-electric scheme! Very impressive –both the subject matter and the skilful way you photographed it. Here’s a new word for you – such a pipe bringing water down to the power station is called a penstock.
      The view from under the road, is cleverly composed with that greenish colour of the underside concrete. The first b&w is undoubtedly my favourite, (actually of the whole collection not just those two), but I do like the second in a different way – more as an abstract composition rather than for what it depicts.

      Comment


        Re: This is Norway - all places without their own thread.

        Anybody here who have heard of "The Panorama Road" in Nordfjord??
        It stretches from Stryn to Eid, along the north side of the fjord: http://kortreist.smp.no/turer/nordve...ticle19951.ece
        Looking at the pictures it must be quite a sight, at least on a day like this photographer had.

        Comment


          Just wanted to share a timelapse from Ørlandet: at the mouth of the Trondheimsfjord.... you can find it at vimeo.com:

          https://vimeo.com/74333030
          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

          Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
          Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

          Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

          Comment


            Originally posted by pakarang View Post
            Just wanted to share a timelapse from Ørlandet: at the mouth of the Trondheimsfjord.... you can find it at vimeo.com:

            https://vimeo.com/74333030
            PS: Something for you as well in this one, MR. JOAKIM!
            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

            Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

            Comment


              The fishfarm food producer Skretting has a large factory at Averøy, and from a bus stop uphill from Bruhagen, we see over to the new 150 meters high funnel with Freikollen (629) mountain at Frei in Kristiansund on the other side of the fjord


              Reinsfjell (994) as seen from Kvaernes stavechurch
              "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

              Comment


                Had nothing better to do last Saturday than to go (drive) out together with my Pentax to try and find some motifs at Aspøy island in Straumsnes south-east of Kristiansund (a short 40 minutes drive).
                I struggeled to get into photography mood..., and came home with only 26 pictures. I'll give you 13 of them for you to enjoy.

                First, from Bergsøy island to the Aspøy island runs Bergsøysundet floating bridge with combined roads RV-70 and E-39 on top. This is a 931 meters long construction anchored only at each end. opened in 1992 when Kristiansund became connected to the mainland Norway :-)




                From there I drove to the old ferry quay, subsequently closed as the bridge opened in 1992. This ferry quay, called Kvisvik, was the main connection to and from Kristiansund before 1992 and the other side is called Kvalvåg.
                This view is a famous one for all who frequently travelled here...., a look west towards Freifjorden, Gjemnes and Eide far back


                Could have held my Pentax a bit higher to make some air between those rusty things and that small island back there, but hey...., who cares...?


                A detail from under where the ferry driveway was mounted


                A collection of old tires to in a way cushion the ferry when docking
                "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                Comment


                  Had to make a b/w detail shot of those ferry docking tires...


                  Then I drove to the narrow channel deviding Aspøy island from Straumsnes..., the Nålsund channel
                  There I found an old rusty mooring ring


                  On the east side (Straumsnes side) of that channel is a beach made of rolling stones (nope, no satisfaction there ;-) )




                  In between some stones there was a crab that has seen the better days of life...


                  Before leaving for home, I stopped above Aspøya Fjordsenter to picture a coastal cargo vessel, the HALSVIK III

                  "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                  Comment


                    One last image from this trip, the shoreline beneath Bergsøysundet floating bridge, a red boathouse and Reinsfjellet (994) with all its communications and tv antennaes
                    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                    Comment


                      A very interesting snapshot of your short trip, Svein. Tell me about that floating bridge at Bergsøysundet, why floating and how does it move?
                      I like the tyre photos, and as for the one at 187.4 with the rusty chains, I like it very much as you have taken it. The chains really dominate the image and the fact that they "overlap" the island emphasises them even more. To have left space between the top of the chains and the island would have been an obvious thing that everyone would do, but you have a stronger image there.
                      Ivy

                      "To thine own self be true.......
                      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                      Comment


                        Thanks for commenting, much appreciated!

                        Can't tell you much about that floating bridge though, other than when it was placed there..., it was the worlds first bridge of this size only anchored on each end and not by any side anchoring.
                        The bridge rest on a series of concrete pontoons, and has two enormous bolts on each side on which she moves in length (from side to side). But just by a few centimeters then.
                        "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                        Comment


                        • ombugge
                          ombugge commented
                          Editing a comment
                          If it is floating there have to be some compensation for tidal range of up to 2.6 m. and possible storm surge of at least another 0.5 m.on top of that: http://vannstand.no/index.php/index....a-kristiansund
                          How is access from shore to the bridge arranged and the anchoring adjusted???

                        You have to take my word for it 'ombugge'..., the bridge is floating.
                        I'm not an engineer, so I don't know the technique and mathematics behind this. All I know is that (as it seem for a leighman in a car) the road does not change in hight/elevation.
                        The engineers calculated the straight for almost two years before the bridge were built and placed there, and they also travelled around the world to check out other floating road bridges.
                        The seven pontoons were made in Kristiansund and tugged in place in a calm place of the Tingvoll fjord so that the steel elements of the bridge could be mounted on top.
                        I'll try to find out more :-)

                        "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                        Comment


                          To 'ombugge' (and others reading Norwegian): This does not tell us why the road does not move vertically due to tide, but how the anchors in each end work and why the bridge is shaped the way it is and how the force of tide, current and winds are transported towards those land anchoring tubes in each end. Sorry folks, you have to translate the best you can by yourselves.

                          ~~Oppdragsgiver : Statens vegvesen Region midt
                          Entreprenør : NC, Aker Verdal Bergsøysundet flytebro ligger i Møre og Romsdal fylke. Brua ble åpnet for trafikk i juni 1992 etter knapt 3 års byggetid. Bruoverbygningen består av et stålfagverk med rørknutepunkter og brubane som orthotrop stålplate. Brua flyter på 7 pongtonger med innbyrdes avstand på ca 105 m. Pongtongene er bygget i høyfast lettbetong LC55. Brukonstruksjonen er formet som en bue i horisontalplanet. Sidelaster fra bølger, vind og strøm føres som aksialkrefter i buen mot landfestene, hvor flytebrua er forankret. Forankringen består av et tykkvegget 18 m langt rør i smidd stål som er stivt forbundet med stålfagverket og landfestet. Vinkelendringen horisontalt- og vertikalt tas opp ved bøyning i røret. Brua er utstyrt med permanent instrumentering; bl.a. for registrering av lekkasje i pongtongene, bølgetilstand, tidevann og bruas bevegelser. Målingene overføres kontinuerlig til en overvåkningssentral.

                          Together with Nordhordalandsbrua (near Bergen) these two bridges are the only ones in the world of this type.
                          Last edited by Sterkoder; April 14th, 2014, 16:01.
                          "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                          Comment


                          • Tommi
                            Tommi commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Think about a spring: it will hold a very long time as long as you don't extend the spring a longer distance as it is designed for.

                          • ombugge
                            ombugge commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Yes I agree, but a movement and bending of up to 1.76 m. (in worst case) over a length of 18 m. is a lot of arch for a spring.
                            Even a tidal range of 2,86 m. will result in bending of 1.43 m. (1 year return) repeated twice a day.

                            For the Storfjord crossing concept the problem of tide and storm surge was taken care of by the tether tension and varying buoyancy of the pontoons, but always enough to keep the bridge in place and at the same vertical position relative to land. The horizontal forces were taken care of by a "lazy S" configuration.
                            This is also a known technology from the Oil and Gas industry, known as Tension Leg Platforms, of which there are at least two in Norwegian waters.

                            I drove over this bridge in December. I'm not worried that they haven't done their "homework" and look after the maintenance properly.
                            The anchoring system is interesting from an engineering standpoint, however. Purely idle curiosity on my part, these days.

                          • ombugge
                            ombugge commented
                            Editing a comment
                            This article appeared on smp.no today: http://www.smp.no/nyheter/indre/article9516153.ece
                            Maybe I should dust off the old plans, one for a floating bridge and one for a submerged floating tunnel for the Storfjord crossing???

                          Well...., I take it that this construction is calculated and scale pretested in every possible way, so I look upon it as terra firma when I drive over it and consider it safe and sound :-)
                          "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                          Comment


                            More bridges means less sveler! A pity!

                            (For the uninitiated: Svele is a piece of food that can only be enjoyed on the ferries in Møre & Romsdal (You can of course have sveler on ferries in Sogn & Fjordane as well, but that's not the same thing. Far from it!)).
                            Regards; Sigve.
                            ---
                            IF I WIN IN LOTTO, I COULD GO EVERYWHERE. WITH FRAM....

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