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  • pakarang
    started a topic This is Trondheim

    This is Trondheim

    This is Trondheim.

    Before we continue this thread, there are 9 pages in the same category at our old board with more tales and images for you all to enjoy.

    http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/viewtopic.php?t=491

    Go on, have a look, then come back and continue here.

  • DS Lyngen
    commented on 's reply
    Name of the place is Skyås utsiktspunkt.

  • pakarang
    replied
    Here is me - longing so very much for warm and long summer nights:

    2018_08_28 MAVIC-The World-DJI_0595 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    And in the last one, I let you try to tell me the name of the exact place:

    2017_10_03 MAVIC Trondheim - DJI_0554 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    I also have two from the broadcasting tower at Tyholt, hence the name "Tyholttårnet":

    2017_10_03 MAVIC Trondheim - DJI_0544 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    2017_10_03 MAVIC Trondheim - DJI_0547 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    These images were not taken today or last week, but during a slightly warmer time of the year (October). The first two were taken at Risvollan.

    2017_10_02 MAVIC Risvollan-DJI_0539 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    2017_10_02 MAVIC Risvollan-DJI_0541 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    Three winter images from Trondheim, as I eagerly waiting for the spring (and summer) to arrive:

    2019_01_22 G7XM2-WinterDay-IMG_3535 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    2019_01_22 G7XM2-WinterDay-IMG_3538 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    2019_01_26 G7XM2-Winterday walk-IMG_3545 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    Thank you so much for dropping by and for commenting.

    Than you Lady C for that in-depth and truly interesting research. You were actually able to find a whole lot more story than I was. Shopping trolleys are certainly a sign of our times, as well as the size of these. I frequently see them at the bottom of Nidelva river, around bus stations at Leangen (the IKEA trolleys) and many other places. About a month ago, I even saw an "elderly" lady pushing one along the street whilst I was on the bus.

    Leave a comment:


  • yvneac
    replied
    No doubt it's an artwork. Even a Land art installation. Thanks for sharing .Also Thanks to Cécilia for her comment.

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied
    Oh yes I think it is art, and yes I like it!
    I can't report on a gradual realisation of what is depicted in this series of images as Sterkoder experienced them though. That's because I remembered I'd already seen just the final view, probably somewhere on pakarang's Instagram.
    But I do also remember dismissing any assumption that the shopping trolley must have been photoshopped into the picture because of the clearly related circular arc on the right. I'd also decided this was art that could be viewed from that riverside arc and steps, but might only be interpreted 'as seen from above' - and that had made me think of some old civilisations, the Nasca lines in Peru, for example.

    In our present day''civilisation', shopping trolleys and trash of all kinds frequently gets dumped, and canals and rivers seem to be especially likely locations.

    Given the scale of the problem suggested in reports like this, it is not surprising that the more environmentally-conscious individuals are expressing their concern not only in getting involved in local community clear-ups, or lobbying the supermarkets, but also raising awareness through art.

    A water company in the east of England, Anglian Water, noted back in 2006 that "Among the most common items of litter removed by RiverCare groups are shopping trolleys, so we commissioned a series of unique sculptures to promote the RiverCare project". One of the artists was Ptolemy Elrington who makes sculptures of riverside wild life from discarded shopping trolleys. (Worth googling if you want to see these ...he makes animal sculptures from scrapped car hubcaps too!)

    An example of less-transformed trolleys as art is currently on display in Newcastle-on-Tyne:-
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/tyne/hi/...00/8295356.stm

    The artist, Abigail Fallis, interprets them as a symbol of consumerism in modern society, which she sees as if linked to our genetics. Her sculpture depicts the double-helix strands of DNA made of trolleys!

    Those are merely two examples that distracted me while trying to find out the artist of the Trondheim sculpture. Try googling for art, sculpture, supermarket trolleys and be amazed how much you get!

    The Trondheim sculpture is a collaboration of Marius Dahl and Jan Christensen and is described here in English:-
    https://www.trondheim.com/art-at-vikelvdalen-ranheim

    I was rather pleased to see mention of the two aspects of interpretation that had first occurred to me, and there is a lot more to think about, not only regarding this sculpture but also the overall project of which it is a part.

    I mustn't forget to add that pakarang's photos in this thread are the first I have seen of this art work from ground level. And I admit to a momentary thought about the first view as a squashed model of the Oslo opera house ...perhaps also suggested by the auditorium-like semicircle looking across to a theatre stage set. Maybe a stop on a walking tour where an actor makes an appropriate recitation - now that's an idea for a future summer festiva event!


    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    commented on 's reply
    Belive it or not, but I got it in the second picture and in the third, it was like YES! :-) But why a shopping cart? (Yes, it's art, that's my opinion anyway).

    And: Ranheim church is a beautiful church, opened in 1933 ;-)

  • pakarang
    replied
    hahahaha.... so true Sterkoder, so true.

    I went to the optician yesterday to have my eyes checked, they said I had to make an appointment.... I replied that it was the second problem I have, not only is my vision failing, but my memory probably won't be good enough to remember an appointment sometime in the future. LOL.

    Here are some images of modern "art"... and I would be interested in hearing if you consider this art or not.

    From the ground, you won't understand what it is.

    2017_04_14 MAVIC RAW - DJI_0045 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    Do you see it now?

    2017_04_14 MAVIC RAW - DJI_0046 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    If not, when you take to the skies, you will easily understand what it's supposed to be:

    2017_04_14 MAVIC RAW - DJI_0040 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    2017_04_14 MAVIC RAW - DJI_0039 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    commented on 's reply
    Can't help you on what vessel went north. We're all getting older, you know ;-)

  • pakarang
    replied
    Aha. OK, thanks for the update. Perhaps the sale northwards didn't happen after all.

    Or, maybe it's my memory that pranks me, and it was another vessel being sold to northern Norway.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Originally posted by pakarang View Post

    Awesome collection of images taken during almost picture perfect winter weather.

    I thought Ørnfløy had been sold to somewhere north of here(?). She used to be tied up at Dora in anticipation to her departure, and when she was no longer there, I thought she had already sailed.

    Or.... was that another vessel I was thinking of maybe?
    The skipsregister at Sjøfartsdirektoratet say that LMJZ ØRNFLØY is currently owned by Fartøyvernforeningen Ørnfløy, 7083 Leinstrand :-)

    Leave a comment:

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