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Aurora Borealis in Norway (the Northern Lights)

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    Aurora Borealis in Norway (the Northern Lights)

    We have had some talk about this phenomenon in the LOFOTEN-thread, so here are links to pictures and info:

    http://alomar.rocketrange.no/allcams.html (live webcams from Alomar observatory on mountaintop by Andenes)
    http://geo.phys.uit.no/articl/nord_eng.html (“all-you-need-to-know” about Aurora, by the University of Tromsø)
    http://www.nordlysfoto.no/a/?id=17&vn=736 (Aurora pics from Andøya by a local professional photographer)
    http://www.photosight.org/photo.php?photoid=90128 (the best Aurora pic from Andenes that I’ve seen so far)
    http://turliv.no/troms4/08nordlys.html (Aurora pics from North-Norway, click “Neste bilde” to view more pages)
    http://www.riesto.no/english/arctic.htm (Aurora pics from Finnmark – English text, good finds on left side menu)
    http://www.spacew.com/gallery/image005197-1.html (Aurora and other things of the sky, mainly from Alaska)
    http://www.windmedia.net/auror.htm (Aurora pics from Bodø – with scientific explanation in Norwegian only)
    http://www.spacecentre.no/?module=Ar...cShow;ID=51155 (educational text in English)
    http://kennethsfotoblogg.blogspot.co...&max-results=3 (Aurora pics Andenes – check links on right side)
    http://kennethsfotoblogg.blogspot.co...&max-results=3 (Aurora pic taken from satellite)
    http://www.spaceweather.com/ (extensive info on “goodies in the sky”)
    http://www.naturfagsenteret.no/wenche/nordlys.pdf (about Aurora – in Norwegian)

    All these should keep even the most curious mind busy on a rainy day...

    #2
    ...and naturally, if any members have a special story or their own special images to share of this phenomenon, please feel welcome to join in!

    My best "Nordlys" experience happened twice....

    The first real time I remember seeing this on a large scale, was during a new year cruise from Rorvik to Kirkenes and back to Rorvik in the late 80's... it was somewhere on the Finnmark-coast, clear and biting cold, dark as in a sack, and the ship was Harald Jarl.... it was absolutely awesome... I remember a Japanese lady out on deck with me, she thought the gods had come to see her.

    The second time, I don't remember the location, but it was on the starboard bridge wing of Crystal Symphony: the sky was fully light in this green dancing light and it was also there, biting cold.
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

    Comment


      #3
      Pea green with envy, Jan-Olav......

      One of these days!!!!! One of these days!!

      I've just seen a wonderful photo taken in the past few days from Tromso by the couple of the blog "My Little Norway"--I'm waiting for permission to post it here...

      Here's a link until then...

      http://mylittlenorway.com/2009/10/fi...of-the-season/


      (and, YES, Jan-Olav, I invited them to join us here at CV...... )

      Comment


        #4
        The Northern Light seen from abord the MS Lofoten in March 2008:



        Doris

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Aurora Borealis in Norway (the Northern Lights)

          Apparently, there is a LOT more Aurora Borealis coming... a GIANT explosion on the very active sun is coming our way:

          http://www.dagbladet.no/2012/03/10/n...dlys/20627682/

          The sun spot on the sun in this article is 7 TIMES LARGER than the EARTH!

          This could end with a huge bang.... according to Google Translate.

          The sun is fierce at the moment. Two eruptions on the sun in the X-class, the most powerful Tuesday night was fortunately not as extensive impact on technology and infrastructure as first feared. Some flights had to be rerouted and some radio communications were disrupted.

          The reason that it generally went well, is that the direction of the magnetic field of the gas cloud that hit was favorable compared to the Earth. But new dangers threaten.

          The huge sunspot AR1429 is pointing straight at us. It is a total of seven times wider than Earth, and forecasts of space weather at the U.S. National
          sea ​​and atmosphere management NOAA estimates that there are 40 percent probability that it leads to a new X-eruptions during the weekend.

          - There was an explosion the night before at five o'clock and a little late last night, but it was very weak. The coughs and splutters a bit all the time, says Brekke.

          Snaps like a rubber band
          Sunspots are areas on the sun's surface with a relatively lower temperature. Those due to magnetic loops that wind their way up to the surface, where they twist around like a rubber band. And, just as in daily life, the elastic snap if twisted too hard.

          - When all the energy is released at once, and the elastic hazards in space, says Brekke.

          The first thing that happens is when a so-called flare emitting excessive amounts of UV and X-ray radiation in the speed of light. It uses eight minutes to reach Earth, where it can cause extensive problems and the collapse in radio communications and navigation.

          So is it, and a coronal mass outlet, a cloud of gas that typically arrive with us several days later. It is this that leads to the spectacular northern lights, when the particles collide with atoms and molecules in the atmosphere. They can also knock out power grids and GPS satellites.

          The radiation from the eruptions are not dangerous to humans on Earth, but can be a very serious threat to astronauts in space.

          Island show
          The outbreaks before the weekend led to the beautiful aurora far south, as in Norway, unfortunately, was destroyed by dense cloud cover over large parts of the country on Thursday. On the east coast of Iceland was seen, however, visible in all its glory, says Jónína Guðrún Óskarsdóttir to Dagbladet.

          - I have experienced this before, but I must say that this was the best I have seen, says Óskarsdóttir.

          The vision will become increasingly common as we proceed towards the so-called solmaksimum in 2013.

          - The next four years will be fantastic, for the time required for a solmaksimum gives typical large auroral activity, says Pål Brekke told Dagbladet.

          - It will be good years for tourists to travel to Norway, he said.

          In this instance it will be visible for six days before it rotates around and no longer point to the earth.

          - But the more it moves around, the more points it out to the side and away from Earth. Earth will not get the same effect, but the particles will still be able to hit the ground and do damage, says Brekke.
          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

          Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
          Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

          Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Aurora Borealis in Norway (the Northern Lights)

            Many weeks ago, actually months by now:

            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

            Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

            Comment

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