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    #16
    Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
    Here is my hops garden. In front is our vegetable garden and in the background is the hops garden. We have a big problem with animals so everything is fenced very well.
    What kind of animals...?

    At my step-fathers home in Norway, we have a problem with wild deers eating the tulips and the rose bushes...
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
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      #17
      Originally posted by pakarang View Post
      What kind of animals...?

      At my step-fathers home in Norway, we have a problem with wild deers eating the tulips and the rose bushes...
      Wildebeests, Jan..................

      (what do you think??????? same the world over... Deer and bunnies.... Solution to your step-father's problem is VENISON.....)

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        #18
        I only cover the lemon tree. I have a portable greenhouse with light bulbs that turn on when it gets below 40f and there is an automatic opener the opens the roof if it gets above 60f. You have to love North Carolina winters. It may be 10f at night and get up to 50f and sunny during the day.

        The herb areas are surrounded by large rock areas and lots of concrete which helps provide heat through the night. They are also at the top of the hill so on still nights the colder air settles down and away from them.

        We have problems with: white tail deer, rabbit, groundhog, opossum and if we have a drought skunks and muskrat.

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          #19
          A recipe? What's that? It has been a long time since I have brewed to someone elses recipe or to a specific style. Much of my brewing is based on ingredients at hand. What can I do with these hops? I suppose some of the brews I've made lately have been a style but I'm too lazy to do the research to find the name.

          I had a period with 3 or 4 not great batches. I was experimenting with crystal malts and had a couple brews with too much carbonation and too much head retention. I jokingly referred to a couple as my magic volcano beers. You could open a bottle and everything was fine but let it sit for a couple minutes and warm and the eruption begins. I had to be attentivley drinking during the critical warming otherwise there was foam everywhere. Interesting at first but I was glad when I finished drinking those.

          I also missed with a big raspberry wheat. Too much wheat and ABV which overwhelmed the raspberry flavor and I went a little too heavy on the hops. Not really a bad beer but not to any style. I just goes to show that more is not always better. I've still got about 15 bottles and they continue to get better with age.

          Last night I started drinking two good custom ales. Both are hoppy ales, slightly low in alcohol for American IPA and darker. One is about lovibond 20 while the other is about 12 or 13 but everything came together very well.

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            #20
            I'm not a big hop head--that would be Alan...he's into IPAs and such (think Sierra Nevada--or have you ever heard of "Alimony Ale"??? ).. English style ales and softer porters for winter are more my "thing"--if I'm improvising, I shy away from anything high in Alpha Acid %-- I like to stick to Kent Goldings and Cascade...Northern Brewer occasionally and the Germans..... I like to use a lot of low-lovibond crystal to color it, rather than the higher..I don't know why- maybe a body thing? Since we use kegs, the carbonation is easier to control, but I built a "beer engine" about 10 years ago from an idea either from Zymurgy or BYOB magazine... Really keeps the carbonation low, with a great creamy head that dissipates fairly quickly. No G-mix for me.....

            Gosh I haven't had a good beer- much less made any- in so long. And right now it's so hot, you get drenched in sweat running from the car to the house. Maybe when I get back from the trip, having spent 4 days in Berlin, I'll be inspired again....

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              #21
              What, 95 degrees with 90% humidity and you do not want to stand next to a big burner and huge pot of steaming water and grain for a couple hours? I'm cheating, doing extracts in the kitchen on the stove with air conditioning.

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                #22
                Haha! I was once brewing inside with extract, and went to transfer from the brewpot to fermenter and missed the funnel...half of it landed on the kitchen floor...what was left was tasty, but was named "lin-ale-eum".....let's just say I like to brew in a place I can easily hose down...

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                  #23
                  I have two bines growing behind my office. Here is nugget. No burrs yet but I expect it will produce a little something this season.

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                    #24
                    It was hot and sticky yesterday so I decided to do a mini batch (to fit a Mr. Beer fermenter) in the kitchen with air conditioning. I don't think I will do that again. It took forever. The stove just does not have the power to bring 3 gallons (11 liter) of water to a boil in a resonable time, and cooling the wort by placing the pot in a sink of ice water also took forever. To keep things simple I did a single infusion with no sparge and my efficiency was lower than I would like but it was about what I expected it would be (My lovely wife took one of my pots to fry a turkey and I am still trying to get the oil out of it. What a P.I.T.A. I wash and scrub, wash and scrub but I still keep seeing a film of oil when I try a test boil.)

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                      #25
                      Dane, dear--Just use the pot to fry turkey from now on. Go to Ace or Walmart and get a canning pot. works wonders... or try vinegar. White vinegar usually works.

                      And fried turkey is SOOOOO good, and if this is the worst thing she has done, give her a HUG!!!!!!!!!

                      I take it you have an electric stove? I do, and oh, how I miss a gas stove... and it's been..15 years since I had a gas cooktop?? LOL

                      If you feel creative, I will look up the instructions for making a wort chiller out of flexible copper tubing and a garden hose... the idea is to have the copper tubing inside the hose (coiled around to make it compact) basically you have the hot wort flowing through the copper tubing, surrounded by cold water running through the hose...and at the end, the wort is pitching temperature ready to go. I think the directions were in Zymurgy years ago...or might be in Papazian's..... it works like a DREAM......and no ice water baths.......

                      I didn't know the mountains of North Carolina got hot and sticky ...
                      (just teasing...I went to college in Virginia, so I know how hot and sticky it can get....)

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
                        I have two bines growing behind my office. Here is nugget. No burrs yet but I expect it will produce a little something this season.

                        Beautiful, Dane!! yes you will get some hops this year!

                        And ever the one for advice...train that vine over along the side of the porch for support!! It will be LOVELY!!!

                        (and gee, now that Alan has built a pergola for the out-of-control wisteria.. wouldn't one with hop vines trained up it be splendid??? hmmmm...)

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                          #27
                          Last night I knew my mash would be less efficient so I threw in some extra grain but today crunching the numbers I only got 63%. I have to go back to sparging outside in the heat so I took some time this afternoon and reclaimed my pot. I scrubbed & washed it about 10 times and I think it is ready to use again. The inside was easy but I spent most of my time getting the burned on oil off the exterior. My wife kept saying "it's on the outside, it does not matter", but I just cannot have a dirty looking pot.

                          I have a gas stove so boiling happened but not at the rate to which I am accustomed. I should have covered the pot while I was heating to speed things up a bit and then uncover for the boil.

                          The bines are coming along nicely. Out of sight to the right of the photograph is another bine growing in the opposite direction. One is magnum and one is nugget so I don't want them to meet in the middle. I have burrs or cones on 2/3 of my bines so I am just happy that I will have something to harvest this first season. One of the cascade is going crazy. I think it's production will equal all the others combined.

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
                            One of the cascade is going crazy. I think it's production will equal all the others combined.
                            Yum!! Probably my favorite hops................ Especially for dry hopping. Love the aroma!

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                              #29
                              Dane- -Oh, I wished for you to be with me yesterday! We stoppped in a restaurant near the entrance to Tivoli in Copenhagen yesterday, to realize it was a working brewpub. All copper, shiny and bright..a big mash tun and brewpot.. right in the middle of the restaurant, open to everything. I washshowing my austic niece the set-up--she is interested in anything shiny- and-behold- up came the brewer. He's a trained chef, but now manages the restaurant and brews three times a week--1000 liter batches. He's very interested in creating specialty brews and was delighted to find a "girl" brewer and came to talk to us. He brought out all sorts of samples...a sloe berry infusion he's going to use as a flavoring...an almost fermented through ale using some eucalyptus added - which gives a wonderful fresh hoppy astringency without the bitterness, and the most lovely infusion of elderberry flowers and orange peel in a sugar syrup that he used in a very lightly hopped pale ale for a wedding reception. The color was exquisite- the color of sunshine- with just a hint of flowery orange--very bridal! He also brought out some dried dandelion root he's thinking of using...and we talked and talked. Quite fun! For fermentation he has a clean room completely lined in tile, and 4 stainless steel OPEN VAT fermenters..... I took pics and will post later....Oh, you would have enjoyed talking with him!!!!!

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                                #30
                                Girl brewers get all the attention.

                                I am so jealous! In Copenhagen, then raise the bar with Tivoli (it has always been closed when I've been there) and rub salt in the wound with a brew pub and private tour with tastings.

                                Did the brewmaster say why they used open fermentors?

                                ---

                                This weekend I will be brewing a generic red ale as a house beer for guests. Nothing fancy. Just something "normal" that most guests will enjoy. I'm not sure what I think of adding pelletized cascade from a factory far, far away to the boil as I look at the TONS of fresh cascade cones on my bines 50 feet away.

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