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  • Norwegian Coffee

    I was just thinking as I returned from the Tennille Post Office (yes, yes, yes Captain...let's see how long 6-10 business days is THIS time.....)

    The Captain, Big S and others have conveyed the sad state of the usual cup of Norwegian coffee. Knowing that Norwegians drink more coffee per capita than any other country on Earth, I wonder why Norwegian coffee is universally proclaimed as "bad".

    If any one has any thoughts on this subject...or ideas how to go about improving the ordinary Cup o' Joe, please feel free to chime in...

    (I wonder how hard it would be to roast coffee beans at home? Heck, it worked for Starbucks........can't you see a franchise of "Captains Coffee" throughout the Hurtigrute route????? mwahahahahahaha)

  • #2
    Originally posted by ehp View Post
    ....If any one has any thoughts on this subject...or ideas how to go about improving the ordinary Cup o' Joe, please feel free to chime in....
    My first thought on seeing this post was "perhaps the Norwegians can buy SWEDISH coffee at IKEA" !!!!!!!!!!!!
    (I used to return from trips to Sweden with luggage packed to bursting with my favourite blends, but then we eventually got an IKEA with a food section in Edinburgh.)

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    • #3
      There's nothing wrong with "norwegian" coffee.
      As there are no growth of coffee beans in Norway, we also get our beans from Colombia, Brazil and those places and the blend is nothing different from the rest of the world.
      If norwegian coffee taste bad, it has to do with the machinery or barista, or both.
      I've tasted really, and I mean really, good coffee in Norway and I've tasted bad...., as I've done in all the other countries I've visited.
      Best coffee I've ever tasted was in the restaurant at the top of the tv/radio mast in Hamburg....
      "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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      • #4
        I was about to say the same as Sterkoder. I`m a bit of a coffee addict and drink about 15 to 20 cups per day. My favourite bean is Colombian.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
          ....If norwegian coffee taste bad, it has to do with the machinery or barista, or both....
          Yes, and an additional factor is in situations where the coffee is just standing around for ages after it was made.

          Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
          .... the blend is nothing different from the rest of the world....
          Well I don't know about Norway, but in the case of Sweden this is not entirely true. There are actually many specific blends which are made there with the Swedish market in mind. One well known one is Zoega’s Skånerost. I have heard it said by Skåne people that it was specially suited to the water in Skåne (but it tastes good when I make it in Edinburgh too!). I also very much like their Mollbergs blend. More recently other Swedish coffee blenders such as Löfbergs Lila have started to market a Skånerost, but I prefer the original.

          Moving north from Skåne, an interesting aspect of visiting the Swedish town of Gävle is the history of importing and blending coffee there and the major Gevalia brand is named after the town. (I believe they actually export some blended coffee to America but am not sure under what name.)

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          • #6
            I have heard it said by Skåne people that it was specially suited to the water in Skåne (but it tastes good when I make it in Edinburgh too!
            Yes, and by telling the public that this is a specially designed coffee for that special area...., kabom...., they can add a krone or something to the price!!
            "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
              Yes, and by telling the public that this is a specially designed coffee for that special area...., kabom...., they can add a krone or something to the price!!
              You old cynic you!!!! Actually I don’t remember seeing that about the water on any advertising stuff; it was just something a Swedish colleague told me. That brand used to seem part of the Skåne identity, and I never saw it in supermarkets further north in Sweden. It was only in later years that it appeared to be marketed more widely in other areas of the country, and I suppose it might have been after that when other brands started to call some of their dark roasts Skånerost in competition with Zoega.

              The original packaging design was also something of a classic. Ah, I’ve posted it before here - no not the Starbucks - just scroll down a bit .

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              • #8
                You old cynic you!!!!
                Mohahahahaha......, nope, not cynic (or maybe so after all), but I've worked in the grocery business for many, many years.
                Mostly as the part of the link which delivered the groceries to the stores, like KØFF (Hakon), Gartnerhallen and BAMA.
                And I've red just about what I need about 'branding'

                Seriously:
                The worst I know when it comes to coffe, are 'fineschmeckers' (or how it's written) who can't drink coffee AT ALL if it's not this-and-that coffee.
                Last edited by Sterkoder; August 19th, 2010, 12:58.
                "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
                  Mohahahahaha......, nope, not cynic (or maybe so after all), but I've worked in the grocery business for many, many years.
                  Mostly as the part of the link which delivered the groceries to the stores, like KØFF (Hakon), Gartnerhallen and BAMA.
                  And I've red just about what I need about 'branding'

                  Seriously:
                  The worst I know when it comes to coffe, are 'fineschmeckers' (or how it's written) who can't drink coffee AT ALL if it's not this-and-that coffee.
                  Such as the Kopi Luwak coffe that had a big role in the movie Ten things to do before you die with Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman.

                  More about the Kopi Luwak
                  Øistein

                  If at first you don’t succeed, skydiving is not for you...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Seagull View Post
                    Yes, and an additional factor is in situations where the coffee is just standing around for ages after it was made.
                    I think THIS is the major problem.

                    I tried Gevalia, and I didn't like it----it tasted...I don't know how to express it...HEAVY?.... to me........

                    My favorite coffee is still my cold-water process Toddy. It produces a strong concentrate that stays in the refrigerator (or I guess could sit on the counter) and I mix it with hot water to heat it and dilute the concentrate. Easy peasy.

                    I agree with you, Big S, about the "fineschmeckers"....lol and BOY, do I know some in America..........

                    Out of curiosity, how expensive is ground coffee in Europe? I know when I lived in Germany, we had ration stamps for coffee, alcohol and gas...because the price was subsidized by the Army, I guess.

                    Here, it's usually packaged in 12 ounce bags (340 grams)...which will cost between USD 3.00 for generic "grocery store" brands like Folgers or Maxwell House, to USD 5.00 for good quality arabica beans to USD 7.00 for ground supermarket Starbucks....

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                    • #11
                      Re: Norwegian Coffee

                      I stumbled into this campaign run by Swedish brand Gevalia where they take on the giant task to introduce the very Swedish term "fika" in the USA.
                      http://www.gevalia.com/Fika/fika-lan...-fika-_-010313

                      I would say that the term "fika" is almost unknown in both Denmark and Norway, and definitely completely unknown in Finland.
                      So what's "fika" anyway? Well it's a break with your friends and colleagues where you enjoy something to drink (mostly coffee, could also be tea/water/juice or even a soda) and preferably together with a small pastry. It's something that you do togehether with people, more a social thing.

                      Now I'm off to get some Löfbergs Lila from my kitchen, so speaking in terms, that would just be a plain coffee.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Norwegian Coffee

                        Who said that Norwegian coffee was the worst in the world????

                        Here is proof of the opposite: http://www.smp.no/nyheter/article7821245.ece

                        Who needs Starbucks???
                        Last edited by ombugge; June 26th, 2013, 17:05.

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