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Extreme Flying.. or Landing?

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    #46
    Anyone else spotted this footage on the news recently? A Russian TU-154 having a rather large control problem. I think the pilot done an incredible job of getting the plane back down again in one piece.

    http://uk.news.yahoo.com/amazing-foo...rol-plane.html
    Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

    Comment


      #47
      I am very interested to hear the cause. Mechanical problem or the pilot over correcting at the controls.

      Comment


        #48
        The report said it was due to mechanical failure of somesort, seems that the plane had been standing for some years and it was being flown to somewhere for major servicing. Amazing, in most countries the plane would not be allowed off the ground until it was fully serviceable, and had passed all it's airworthiness tests. The news report makes it sound like it was being flown somewhere to be given those tests! But we all know to take with a pinch of salt what is written in the papers. Who knows, for all we know the pilot could have been on the Vodka!
        Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

        Comment


          #49
          Who knows, for all we know the pilot could have been on the Vodka!
          I don't know why we (myself included) have such thoughts as soon as we're talking about russian aviation...., because there are no less drunk pilots in British Airways, Air France, Delta, KLM, Qantas and I don't know what other companies.
          The difference is that the russian pilots are in a good and happy mood and not so cautious about covering up their drinking.
          Whereas western "straight-and-serious" pilots close their armoured c ockpit door and fall asleep (at least one of them, because we all understand an airplane need a minimum of one pilot to function for take-off).
          I'm not trying to put an 'equal' sign between drinking and pilots, because there are just a tiny prosentage doing so...., I'm just telling what different documentaries in different tv-channels have come up with going under cover....
          In most of the cases when a pilot is falling asleep, it has NOTHING to do whatsoever with alcohol...., rather fatigue due to a tight schedule. But here we are, far out on the ocean of 'off topic'
          "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

          Comment


            #50
            This is quoted from the article that acompanied the video:
            "During a test flight, the steering system broke down on the TU-154B-2 plane belonging to the Defence Ministry's 800th air base,'' the spokesman said.
            "Thanks to the great professionalism and supreme skill of the pilots, the crew managed to land on the second attempt at Chkalovsk aerodrome, avoiding casualties among the airforce and the local population.''
            And here is a comment posted below that same article:
            Peter Bethge
            Having been a pilot for many years I know how difficult this must have been - Although it looked outrageous from the ground, this was very skilled and amazing Piloting to get the TU-154 on the ground without any casualties - Well done to the Pilots.
            Landing a plane without "steering" is not something that is done by a drunken Pilot in my opinion, regardless of which nationality he/she may be.

            I assume he would have to steer using the throttles???

            Comment


              #51
              Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
              Anyone else spotted this footage on the news recently? A Russian TU-154 having a rather large control problem. I think the pilot done an incredible job of getting the plane back down again in one piece.

              http://uk.news.yahoo.com/amazing-foo...rol-plane.html
              You will see from my original post that i had nothing but praise for the pilot concerned, an amazing job of bringing the plane down. My comment regarding the vodka was meant to be a humorous one whilst mentioning you cannot always believe what is reported in the news.

              And i do agree with what Sterkoder mentioned -

              I don't know why we (myself included) have such thoughts as soon as we're talking about russian aviation....
              I guess it comes from the way Russians were portrayed in many films etc, whilst they were behind the iron curtain.

              But again, i certainly did not seriously think that the pilot involved was drunk, and have nothing but admiration for the way the pilot managed to land a plane that had suffered total loss of steering.
              Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

              Comment


                #52
                Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
                ...Amazing, in most countries the plane would not be allowed off the ground until it was fully serviceable, and had passed all it's airworthiness tests...
                I don't know about the rest of the word but waivers are often given for ferrying aircraft in need of service and for test flights. Certainly they are not permitted to carry passengers. Usually the ferry permit is there for the asking. It's primarily up to the owner & maintenance personnel to determine if the plane is good enough to make the trip. It is a permit to fly an aircraft that has known problems and otherwise does not meet the regulations for safe flight.

                Lets face it, aircraft are very large and complex. Not all repairs can be made in the field. Often, proper repairs can only be made inside a maintenance hangar sometimes located hundreds of miles/kilometers away. So, you file the paperwork for a ferry permit. Only the minimum required crew are aboard and it's a calculated risk. Luckily airplanes are very expensive so arriving at the destination is usually in everyone's best interest.

                Comment


                  #53
                  Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
                  It's primarily up to the owner & maintenance personnel to determine if the plane is good enough to make the trip. It is a permit to fly an aircraft that has known problems and otherwise does not meet the regulations for safe flight.
                  Thank you for the insider knowledge on that one Dane, I must admit to being rather surprised by the information. But i quite agree, aircraft are very expensive things, plus of course the lives onboard are at stake, so it really makes no sense for any company or person to risk flying a plane somewhere without them feeling certain that it was capable of doing so. But even so, it's still surprising that official inspectors are not involved with inspecting the plane before it's allowed to fly anywhere. Maybe i am being very naive about the whole issue. I know from my time in the marine industry in this country, that if for example we wanted to tow a small commercial barge from point A, to point B, we could not do so until an official inspector from the MCA had been down and issued the barge with the appropriate paperwork. Without it we are not allowed to make the journey. And that applies to a simple flat top barge. And the paperwork would always stipulate that no persons at all were allowed to stay aboard the barge whilst under tow. I and a team of engineers could spend a week going all over the barge checking it for seaworthiness, but without that official paperwork from the official inspection, that barge would not be allowed to make the trip. Even if the barge was going into dry dock for some work to be done, we could not undertake that journey without an exemption ticket being issued.

                  Does the aviation authority conduct an in depth inspection of a plane before it issues a ferry permit?, or is it's airworthiness decided solely by the planes own engineers? - which would basically be a sort of self certification. That is the bit that surprises me.
                  Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                  Comment


                    #54
                    There are two very different categories of flight and safety. First is carrying passengers which demands a higher level of safety and regulation and the commercial airlines accident record shows that they have done a very good job insuring passenger safety. Huge fines have been weighed against airlines for failing to perform or properly document inspections or repairs. Passenger safety is taken very seriously. Ferry flights for maintenance are a totally different matter. The government, aircraft owner and pilots all know that they are flying a damaged aircraft. It's something that just has to be done and it's a calculated risk. Usually the plane is flown very light and under good weather conditions to insure that things go right. If a passenger carrying flight is 99.9999999% safe a maintenance flight may be only 99% safe. The officials do not want innocent people on the ground hurt, the pilots do not want to die, the aircraft owner does not want to loose a very expensive airplane and the airline does not want their name on the news with a accident.

                    The inspection of commercial aircraft is performed by the airlines/owners technicians or the sub contractors that they hire. There is usually no government official that actually inspects the aircraft. The government inspects the inspection procedure and insures that some mechanic signed the form saying that the work was performed and that it was OK. Honestly the government does not know the A380 or 787 as well as the manufacturer. They work with the manufacturer to establish guidelines and tests but much of is cutting edge, never been done before stuff so it's a bunch of engineers thinking what could go wrong and pointing at another group and saying prevent it or come up with a way to handle it if it ever happens.

                    When I built and test flew my airplane it all had to be done over sparsely populated area with no passengers. I had a series of tests to perform to insure that the aircraft was safe but no official ever touched or even looked at the aircraft. It was up to me to make sure I did not kill myself. Once all the tests were performed and passed then the aircraft was approved and allowed to fly free wherever and carry passengers but it was all done based on my signature (as the builder and owner).
                    Last edited by pilotdane; May 13th, 2011, 03:30.

                    Comment


                      #55
                      This is all sounds like good common sense to me, you are quite right, nobody would know a certain type of plane better than the engineers that have been specifically trained and certified for that particular type of aircraft. After reading your explanations i can clearly understand the rigid procedures that are already in place further down the line. The engineers and crew that check these planes before the flight are clearly the best people to make that call. Thank you for explaining it all in such detail.
                      Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                      Comment


                        #56
                        Re: Extreme Flying.. or Landing?

                        Proof that Mother Russia is still at the forefront of aviation, who knows?
                        I'd say Mother Russia is slowly waking up from it's deep sleep!

                        Sukhoi Su-37 ready to play!
                        Infamy, Infamy.... They've got it in for me! Said The Laughing Assassin.

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                          #57
                          Re: Extreme Flying.. or Landing?

                          If you love fast jets and music..... kick back and enjoy!
                          Take it away boy's!

                          Infamy, Infamy.... They've got it in for me! Said The Laughing Assassin.

                          Comment


                            #58
                            Re: Extreme Flying.. or Landing?

                            And now.... the ultimate RAF fighter, the English Electric Lightning!!
                            Ma' baby!!!!!

                            Infamy, Infamy.... They've got it in for me! Said The Laughing Assassin.

                            Comment


                              #59
                              Re: Extreme Flying.. or Landing?

                              Now, this clip really shows a flight of extreme: both during flight and landing:

                              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                              Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                              Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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                                #60
                                Re: Extreme Flying.. or Landing?

                                Father and son sent an iPHONE up into space, from a home made balloon: see it in the video of this article:

                                http://www.storm.no/nyheter/far-og-s...n-3318721.html
                                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                                Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                                Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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