Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Nasa TV

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Nasa TV

    In the old forum we had a thread for spaceflight stuff with particular reference to NASA TV
    http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/...?p=39402#39402

    So I thought I’d put this across onto new forum as I know others are as addicted as I am.
    OK, having been teasing ehp on a Crystal thread this afternoon I admit to coming oh soooo close to going OT there big time – but now here I’ll get serious and say:
    As well as the NASA TV being my background listening over the last few days, I have just (well, 15 minutes ago now after realising we didn’t have a thread here) seen the space station pass from my location here in Edinburgh (where we are enjoying great weather and clear skies) – brighter than Venus.
    Last edited by Seagull; March 21st, 2009, 22:18.

    #2
    Love it too....

    http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/live_tv.html
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Seagull View Post
      I have just (well, 15 minutes ago now after realising we didn’t have a thread here) seen the space station pass from my location here in Edinburgh (where we are enjoying great weather and clear skies) – brighter than Venus.
      PEA GREEN WITH ENVY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      When we still had satellite TV, NASA was a regular channel, and I would have it on all the time. I forget now to turn it on the computer and keep it in the background. I feel so out of touch. I love watching EVAs--I know some people think it's like watching paint dry, but I find it fascinating.....

      Comment


        #4
        They have the red light... the red warning light, just now....
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
        Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
        Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

        Comment


          #5
          I know some people think it's like watching paint dry,
          Well, if watching NASA TV is like looking at paint dry...., I could watch all the different colours in the palet dry for days...

          We could also see the space shuttle from Kristiansund/Trondheim on thursday at 20:24:45 local time in the south-southwest..., but since I didn't knew what to look for..., I missed it even though we had clear skies and I had a binocular....

          Well, I imagine it would just be a white spot anyway..., or what do you say 'Seagull'....??
          "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

          Comment


            #6
            Forget the binoculars. Just look in the predicted direction for a star-like object which is moving.
            (I’m sure anything moving should immediately attract the attention of a plane spotter like you, Sterkoder ! )

            The space station is visible because of reflected sunlight, so viewing opportunities soon after sunset or just before sunrise are most favourable as it will appear brighter. As it is seen moving (west to east) it will also become brighter at its greatest elevation.
            As viewed from my location last night, at its maximum elevation of 28° it attained the same brightness as the planet Venus. It then became dimmer before entering the earth’s shadow at an elevation of 13° (i.e. no longer seen even though still above the horizon). I actually watched it moving across the sky for about 5 minutes (theoretically the visible pass was 6 minutes 57 seconds, but initially it would be too low on the horizon).
            As you are further north the max. elevation will be lower.

            (Although sometimes binoculars can reveal some shape and structure, it can be tricky to track a moving object, and there may be too much glare. Something to try perhaps once you are more experienced at quickly locating it.)

            Comment


              #7
              Anybody know what time???????

              CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Shuttle Discovery's astronauts have one last spacewalk ahead of them. Late Monday morning, two former schoolteachers — Joseph Acaba and Richard Arnold II — will venture outside the international space station and take another crack at deploying a jammed equipment storage platform.

              On Saturday, spacewalkers accidentally inserted a pin upside down on the platform. The catch for the mechanism also proved to be unusually stiff.

              This time, Acaba and Arnold will use all their strength to get the platform deployed properly. They will have pry bars and hammers with them, just in case. If all else fails, they will tie the platform down with sturdy tethers to keep it from banging around.


              PRY BARS and HAMMERS?? I guess men will be men, whether on earth or in space. "If it doesn't fit, force it....if it breaks, it needed replacing anyway..." and "if in doubt, use the hammer"

              Comment


                #8
                Space Shuttle Launch As Seen From The International Space Station

                Here is the wide angle view:


                Photo courtesy of NASA

                Now for a closer look:


                Photo courtesy of NASA

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by PeaSea8ch View Post
                  [FONT=Palatino Linotype][SIZE=3][COLOR=Blue]Here is the wide angle view:
                  "Oh, look, there comes the mail man with our letters from home".
                  With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                  Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                  Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                  Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                  Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                  Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    That's the first time i have seen that view of a shuttle launch - FANTASTIC!
                    Looks like a very tall upside down twister from space.
                    Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      now THAT is an amazing shot!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                      waaayyyyy cool.................... even for me with no coffee yet!!!!!!!!

                      (the mailman comment is hilarious...)

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Amazing photos!

                        And what I'm amazed about is that the crew of the ISS are not that far away from home.
                        It seems like with a strong binocular, they're able to see cars moving in Florida.
                        I guess they are about 240 km up...?
                        "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
                          I guess they are about 240 km up...?
                          The Space Station flies closer to 350 km (190 nautical miles) in altitude at 27.700 km (17,210 miles) per hour. Another Space Station factoid is the orbital decay (decrease in altitude) is 2 km (1.3 miles) per month. So, in about 4 years and 7 months time, you will be correct!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Ok...., but do the ISS have any kind of boost to increase altitude again...?
                            I mean, they can't keep loosing altitude "forever"...., we all know what happens then
                            "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                            Comment


                              #15
                              To the best of my knowledge, there are no thrusters installed to boost the ISS to higher orbits. There are small thrusters designed for small attitude changes when the unmanned supply vehicle arrives.

                              The US and international partners have all signed up to man and support ISS until the end of 2015. The ISS was designed to simply loose altitude over time and then burn up during reentry into the earth's atmosphere at the end of her design life.
                              Obviously, towards the end NASA will have to watch this very carefully to ensure when ISS reenters any debris that survives will hit the earth in a sparsely populated area (e.g. the Pacific Ocean).

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X