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  • Surabaya-Singapore Airbus 320-200 missing.

    Another plane tragedy: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-30614627
    Ivy

    "To thine own self be true.......
    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

  • #2
    This is a new unfathomable disaster adding to the lists of plane troubles in history.

    I can't even begin to imagine the sorrow, pain and distress the people left behind must feel.

    I won't comment on the disaster itself, as I feel we must wait to find out what happened before coming with our own opinions.
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

    Comment


    • nari
      nari commented
      Editing a comment
      It seems astounding that this is now the third likely disaster this year involving an Asian airline. How unlucky can that be?

  • #3
    The one surprising thing is how quickly the aviation industry is moving to address the issue. Aviation normally moves at a glacial pace but both Boeing and Airbus have really been working to develop various technologies and systems. I hope regulators will move with haste to approve at least some interim measures.

    One of Boeing's upgrades can be retrofitted to many existing aircraft with just a software upgrade. It's easily added but since it uses existing systems that can be turned off by the crew it's not 100%. It automatically transmits the aircraft's position to satellites at regular intervals. Further refinements would be to transmit the aircraft's heading, altitude and airspeed so it's final resting place can be more accurately determined from the last transmission.

    Airbus touts adding another pinger that operates at a lower frequency making it detectable at greater range under water. Boing thinks it's not needed if you know the aircraft's position accurately before it hits the water. The low frequency pinger does have the benefit that it can't be turned off by the crew and will function if the other technology fails (aircraft avionics, satellite uplink...) somehow. Both manufacturers have higher capacity batteries that can be retrofitted to existing pingers extending their operating time from a minimum of 30 days to 90. There is even the possibility of an aircraft pinger. This pinger is not attached to a data recorder but would be used to simply locate the aircraft.

    Ejectable data recorders are also a option. Even though they are currently used by military aircraft they do occasionally eject their transmitters when they should not. Even at extremely high reliability rates the large number of commercial flights could mean over two pingers per month being accidentally deployed. And, they don't always deploy when they should in an accident. How would you like to have your flight cancelled because the plane accidentally pooped it's pinger?

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    • #4
      There are speculations of an "explosive decompression" mid air or explosion on board.... have anyone heard if there have been found traces of explosives, or are there natural causes by for example the weather?

      http://www.dagbladet.no/2015/01/12/n...sjon/37136936/
      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
      Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
      Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

      Comment


      • #5
        The involvement of the Singapore navy has ended and the last ship has returned to Singapore after finding the major part of the fuselage: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...s/1597976.html

        Here is a live blog and video from CNA: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...t/1583898.html

        Comment


        • #6
          The result of the enquiry has just been released. Irritating alarms and pilot error is blamed: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...h/2309218.html

          Comment


          • #7
            A bit more details here: http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se-...igation-report

            Yes, pilot error was the ultimate cause of the crash, as has been concentrated on in the media, but the underlying fault and chain of event is better explained here.
            Why the entire RTL unit was not changed when it had malfunctioned 23 times in a year is a question that need to be asked. (I don't know enough about the subject to answer that though)

            Comment


            • pakarang
              pakarang commented
              Editing a comment
              Thanks for sharing that link. That is a better explenation of the chain of events than I have come across before!
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