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Malaysian Airlines flight MH370

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    #46
    Interesting to read about your opinion on transponders vs. locator beacons.

    Still today, just passed 4 weeks after the plane went missing, we are no closer to a solid evidence on what happened.

    I find it really strange that we can trace any iphone when we loose it, almost down to exact location, but when a billion dollar aircraft goes missing, we have no way of finding it.

    It also makes me ask why we were not able to track any of the iphones on board?

    Here is some other theories, though a bit on the "wilder side" of things:

    The real reason why MH370 disappeared: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzgQwDeP7eM

    The plane was hijacked: http://www.secretsofthefed.com/break...-diego-garcia/


    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

    Comment


      #47
      Though a leader of technology the aviation industry is amazingly slow to change. For an industry with very narrow profit margins government regulators and the news media are always watching. They are very resistant to anything that is not proven. New technology that improves engine efficiency can increase profit. A transponder or data recorder does nothing in the short term for profit so they only do what is required.

      A bigger question is should the most current technology be required? Should classic cars be illegal because they do not have modern air bags and stability control? What if the car you bought last year required $10'0000 of upgrades to meet this year's new regulations? But, if you have ever looked out the window of an airplane for hours and seen nothing but water or ice how much is your life worth...

      ---
      Cell phones use ground based antennas which are optimized for ground reception. Their high gain antennas are tuned to a very narrow beam at ground level. Receiving signals from phones miles in the air was not designed into the system. Then the aluminum tube of an aircraft further restricts the signal. Without technology aboard the aircraft to relay the signal the current cell phone network is not much use while in the air.

      Comment


        #48
        Originally posted by pilotdane View Post

        A bigger question is should the most current technology be required? Should classic cars be illegal because they do not have modern air bags and stability control? What if the car you bought last year required $10'0000 of upgrades to meet this year's new regulations? But, if you have ever looked out the window of an airplane for hours and seen nothing but water or ice how much is your life worth...
        .
        I think it's very difficult, if not impossible to compare a private vehicle that carries 5 people around on the ground, to a commercial aircraft that carries hundreds people. Sea going passenger ships often have to meet upgraded sets of rules, even if that does cost the operator money.

        And of course, airlines themselves are not immune to changes that result from instances other than faults with the actual aircraft. 9/11 highlighted the need to make the c0ckpit more secure. Result, airlines had to replace the original doors with newer ones.

        But, in many ways the black boxes are critical for the safety of each and every other plane of the same type. It's information can hopefully help in identifying the cause of any incident that may occur. Is there a design flaw built into a certain make and model of aircraft that could lead to loss of the plane? Is there a weakness not yet recognised in a particular wiring loom? etc, etc. Obviously any such faults are normally found and corrected without major incident, and if the fault is deemed to be down to some design error, or a component not meeting specified parameters, then a safety bulletin can be issued. Or in extreme cases whole fleets could be grounded by law until certain modifications are made. Again, nearly always these faults are found and dealt with without the loss of a plane. But, in the event of a disaster, the information contained within those black boxes could prove critical in understanding what happened to that plane. And more importantly, it may even save any other plane from suffering the same plight.

        If a ship that may only be carrying a small handful of crew is obliged by law to use the latest AIS technology, then i see no excuse for airlines that carry millions of passengers a year to be exempted for making certain upgrades.

        Is it unreasonable to fit all commercial aircraft with a transponder that cannot be disabled by the crew? Is it unreasonable to want to know where a plane carrying up to 400+ pax is at any given time? And why on earth does a c0ckpit voice recorded still only record the last half hour of conversation before it records over itself again? Why? because when these boxes were designed a few decades ago, that was all that was available. Nowadays we have very reliable solid state storage that could record a months worth of voice recordings if needed. (I would like to think that newer planes are indeed carrying voice recorders that record more than half hours worth of tape???)

        And if fitting transponders to black boxes is proven to be much better than the normal pinger locators, they simply should be fitted, if not to existing aircraft, then to all new aircraft. Otherwise 20 years from now we will be no further forward.


        Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

        Comment


          #49
          That they managed to catch the signals from the pinger after only a few days must be "the luck of the Irish". Whit half the Indian Ocean as search area it is nothing short of amazing.
          Unfortunately it appears that the batteries have now expired, so an accurate position fix is no longer possible using towed hydrophones. But since they heard the signal several times and for different duration, it is possible to narrow down the search area to something manageable for sonar search, whether by the drone, or by surface equipment.

          The HMS Echo has very powerful sonar equipment on board, which should be able to detect large pieces of wreckage even at 4500 m. WD. The other ships involved is more attuned to detect submarines in much shallower waters.

          I repeat, bring in the Long liners working in the Southern Ocean, They can detect fish at that depth and cover a large area fairly quickly. There are also civilian vessels in the region with ROVs able to work in this kind of water depth. But they would need to have the search area narrowed down to a few sq. n. miles, as does the drone now in use.

          It was also interesting to hear BBC ask the question about why this plane could fly unidentified and undetected (in real time) across the most densely populated part of Peninsular Malaysia.
          They didn't get much in way of an answer. Not surprising to those who have some experience from the region, but it will eventually have to be addressed.

          Comment


            #50
            Originally posted by ombugge View Post
            That they managed to catch the signals from the pinger after only a few days must be "the luck of the Irish". Whit half the Indian Ocean as search area it is nothing short of amazing.
            I have never entertained all the conspiracy theories that have been chucked around, but after them catching the signals from the pinger after such a short time looking, maybe i will think twice about dismissing all the conspiracy theories in future.

            Like you say, amazing they managed it, given the very limited information to hand (or that we know of). That's one hell of a big ocean to find something that can only be heard from 5 - 6 km's away on a good day.

            Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

            Comment


              #51
              I must admit that i have doubts about the 'pings' that were detected. Only a handful of ping's heard, some were 300km apart, some were at 33khz, not the 37.5khz expected from a black box. And why so few ping's detected? If you are towing a detector you will know the exact position in which a ping was heard. So in theory you are within the range of the pinger. So why no constant contact when listening from that position again?

              Plus, still no wreckage found - nothing at all. They would have been able to work out a rough idea of where debris would have tracked to, but nothing found. From what i have seen from other accidents where commercial aircraft have hit the ocean, there have always been plenty of flotsam. I guess that if it made a perfect unpowered landing on the ocean, and if the ocean was calm enough, then there might be a chance the plane may have stayed more or less intact. But, what are the realistic chances of that happening with nobody in control? Near zero i would have thought.

              Maybe i am just being sceptical, but i still feel that they would have stood nearly zero chance of finding the pinger's before the batteries gave in. The ocean is too large, and i do not believe that anyone can be that sure about the exact location to search anyway.
              Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

              Comment


                #52
                The drone is not able to get down to the bottom in the most likely search area due to working depth limitation, so they just moved the search to somewhere with less depth.
                To hire civilian vessels with ROVs able to go deep enough to search in more than 4500 m. WD appears to be the logical solution. But who is going to pay the bill?

                Comment


                  #53
                  I found this Strait Times compilation of events re: MH 370, which is very detailed and does not appear to have too many factual or technical faults, or any unrealistic speculations: http://www.straitstimes.com/STI/STIM...html#Chapter-2
                  It is not fully up to date, but worth while reading.

                  With the initial search area now covered by sonar and without any debris found, the area will now be expanded according to PM Tony Abbott.
                  At the same time the search for floating debris will be trapped down as the chances of finding any is greatly diminished after 52 days:
                  http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...e/1085862.html

                  If anything is still floating, or washed up on a beach somewhere it will not help in identifying the crash site. It is also not likely to be anything that could cast light of the cause of the crash.
                  That is unless something is found in an area that indicate that the plane is NOT in the Southern Indian Ocean, but somewhere else all together.

                  Remember, the plane was plotted first heading towards Penang and later reported seen flying low over the southern Maldives, in which case it COULD be somewhere NE of the Seychelles at equivalent distance as the present search area. Another area with little or no shipping or fishing activity.
                  But then, what about the "pings" heard by the Ocean Shield and the calculations made by Inmarsat?

                  Comment


                  #54
                  This is one gigantic mystery - saw a great documentary on Discovery last night (or the night before), which also looked on all aspects known so far, and which also asked a series of critical questions to many different parties.

                  I still can't fathom how they can simply "loose" a triple-7 aircraft, while there are systems out there which basically can find my iPhone if I ever misplace it (used it last week).

                  Conspiracy theories are abundant as well: as always:

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfTDqa45ZG4

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2eQ3XGqMWA

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2RMqViKohg

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQYud1RDTKs

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzgQwDeP7eM

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMl88L1y-Jg
                  With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                  Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                  Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                  Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                  Comment


                    #55
                    How about the news which stated that the co-pilots phone tried placing a phone call?

                    His mobile phone was confirmed picked up by a land-station at Penang, but was disconnected before the call got picked up/placed.

                    Sounds to me he tried alerting someone ---- do they also know who he tried calling?
                    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                    Comment


                      #56
                      Even the BAY OF BENGAL is now being searched..... after making some interesting images:

                      http://www.vg.no/nyheter/utenriks/fl...et/a/10131069/

                      What strikes me when I saw this is that THEY REALLY HAVE NO IDEA where the aircraft went/is.
                      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                      Comment


                        #57
                        Additionally, the final words from the ****pit we heard about earlier apparently is a FAKE radio recording, according the professionals investigating the sound-tapes.

                        http://www.vg.no/nyheter/utenriks/fl...ar/a/10131141/

                        The background sounds doesn't sound right at all, there is noise in some parts and dead quiet in other parts... in addition to clearly different voices and environments during the different parts.

                        Will we ever know what happened to this aircraft?
                        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                        Comment


                          #58
                          Originally posted by pakarang View Post
                          Will we ever know what happened to this aircraft?
                          I'm beginning to doubt it.
                          It has dropped right out of the news here.
                          Ivy

                          "To thine own self be true.......
                          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                          Comment


                            #59
                            Youtube is full of conspiracy theories though:

                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pp8ZiK23nLc

                            Interesting in this video is that ISRAEL has an (identical) B777 in "storage" which they bought from Malaysia Airlines at the end of 2013 -taken over in France and flown to Israel for storage.
                            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                            Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                            Comment


                              #60
                              And before the aircraft is found, the first book is ready to be published and the first film about the disaster is in the making:

                              http://www.dagbladet.no/2014/05/18/n...h370/33359939/
                              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                              Comment

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